Easter Roundup: Easy Crafts & Recipes For Easter

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Here is a quick little recap of all sorts of Easter egg dying methods, crafts and recipes to make your holiday totally awesome. I hope you have a wonderful Easter, and don’t hit the peeps to hard or you’ll be paying for it later. Peep hangovers are nothing to mess with!

glow sticks glow in the dark easter eggs

Egg Dying Methods:

How to Make Polka Dot Easter Eggs

How to Dye Eggs With Natural Ingredients

How to Dye Eggs with Rubber Bands

Glow in the Dark Easter Eggs

Jelly Bean Mason JarSimple Craft Ideas:

Marshmallow Peeps Gift Idea

How to Color Shredded Coconut

Easter Treats in Glass Jars

Jelly Bean Mason Jar

How to Make a Fresh Flower Easter Centerpiece

baked pineapple recipeYummy Easter Recipes:

Baked Pineapple

Sweet Potato Casserole

Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots

The Best Carrot Cake I’ve Ever Made

How to Make Pickled Eggs

Rustic Split Pea Soup w/ Ham

Pineapple Buttermilk Pie

easter trivia

Plus check out some fun Easter Trivia to make your Easter dinner conversation much more lively and a fun Easter Scavenger Hunt for your after dinner festivities!

Have a hoppy Easter.

Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Glow in the Dark Easter Eggs with Glow Sticks

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glow sticks glow in the dark easter eggs These glow in the dark Easter Eggs were such a hit with my kids last year I wanted to share the tutorial again for those of you with kids who are growing a little tired of the same of Easter Egg hunt. 

**************************

This year instead of a traditional Easter Egg hunt on Sunday morning, I’ll be hiding Monkey Boy and The Girl’s Easter eggs after the sun goes down. They are teenagers, and getting them to go outside and hunt for candy filled eggs at the crack of dawn just isn’t as fun as it use to be. So in an effort to bring back some of that fun, I’ve decided to make egg hunting a little more exciting this year by making my kids hunt for their Easter eggs in the DARK! glow in the dark easter eggs glow sitcks How to Make Glow In the Dark Easter Eggs Supplies 12 plastic Easter Eggs 12 Glow Stick Bracelets a wee bit of candy Directions Open plastic eggs, snap bracelets to activate and stuff the bracelets in to the Easter Eggs along with a treat. glow sticks glow in the dark easter eggsHappy Hunting! ~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Make Newspaper Seedling Pots

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How to Make Newspaper Seedling Pots

{This post was first published in 2012 but I thought I’d post it again for those of you who missed it}

Have you ever made your own newspaper pots before? If you haven’t, they are are super easy to make. Some people use tin cans, but I prefer to use the Pot MakerI’ve found I can whip out a batch of 50 pots for my seedlings in about 20 minutes or less.

pot makerHere is a quick tutorial on how to use the Pot Maker.

newspaper

Cut newspaper strips 4″ by 9″ each. {20 pots = 20 strips of newspaper}how to make a paper pot

Cover pot maker with newspaper and roll.
make your own paper pot

Make sure your paper is wrapped tight around the pot maker.how to make a paper pot

Fold the bottom of the paper inward.how to make a paper pot

Place the newspaper wrapped pot maker in the stand that’s included with the kit and give it a little twist.how to make a paper pot

And a jiggle.how to make a paper pot seedlings

Then slowly remove the newspaper from the wooden pot maker. how to make a seedling paper pot

It’s that easy.
paper pot for seedlings

Add potting soil, seeds and a little bit of water and you’re good to go. DIY-paper-pot-seedlings

These pots are not only easy to make, but pretty thrifty too. Free newspaper √ Free labor √ {have your kids make them} Life is good! Bontanical Interests has the Pot Maker on sale right now for $12.98.

Do you make your own pots or just buy them at the store instead?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Primitive Rug Hooking – How to Dye Wool Using Cushing’s Dyes

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how to to dye wool using cushing dyes

Last week I shared my list of basic supplies and how I draw out patterns for my hooked rugs. This week I thought I’d share how I dye 100% wool fabric using Cushing’s Perfection Dyes. Next week I’ll show you how I hook my rugs.

the wool studio Rebecca erb swatches

When you are searching for wool fabric for your hooked rugs, you want to look for 100% wool. Sometimes I’ll get lucky and find 100% wool at the fabric store, but often times it’s either really expensive {even with a coupon} or not what I’m looking for texture or pattern wise. When I first started rug hooking I would buy wool and wool blend skirts from the thrift stores and take them apart before dying them. But my results were always a bit mixed and more often than not the colors didn’t turn out the way I had hoped they would. So I stopped buying “used” wool.

These days I prefer to buy wool from Rebecca Erb’s Wool StudioShe offers such an amazing assortment of colors and textures {the selection is always changing} that it has become my one shop for buying wool. The quality of her wool is amazing, and I have never once been disappointed with the wool I have purchased from her.

New customers can order a 30 swatch New Customer Mailer for $5.00. If you become an active customer by ordering 2 yards {or $42.00}, you will be added to her quarterly swatch mailing list.

Every once in a while I will place a big order from The Dorr Mill Store {their oatmeal wool is one of my favorites} but only when I know I’ll be ordering quite a few yards because the cost to ship a package from the East coast to the West coast add up quick. Buying from 1 supplier has really helped me save on shipping.

wool fabric for rug hooking

Once you have your wool fabric, you’ll want to cut it into 1/4 or 1/8 yard pieces. This will make it easier to cut into strips later {I’ll cover that next week}. When I dye wool I like to use an assortment of textures and colors. I find it makes the rugs a little more interesting if all the colors are not so matchy matchy.

ivory liquid

Next, you’ll want to get your wool wet. Pre-soak your wool in warm water with a wetting agent such as Ivory liquid.

wool for rug hooking

You will only need a couple of drops of soap. Then, allow your wool to soak for about 1 hour.cushing perfection dyes

While you are waiting on your wool to soak. gather up your Cushing’s Perfection DyesSome of my favorite recipes come from Wendy Miller’s Recipes from the kitchen of The Red Saltbox, but you can find all sorts of dye recipes books online. Note: You do not want to breath the dyes in. It is recommend that you wear a dust mask or measure dyes outside so you do not breath them in.

cushings rug hooking dyes

You’ll need Cushing’s dyes to dye your own wool. Rit dye {although I love it} is just not going to cut it because you want to be able to blend several different colors together so you are not working with primary colors. Cushing’s dyes cost around $2.85 each and it typically takes tiny amounts of several different colors to create the warm, primitive colors I love to use in my rugs. I use  Mini Stainless Steel Measuring Spoons to measure out my dyes instead of shelling out big bucks for the fancy dye spoons most rug hooking supply sites sell.

rug hooking dye pot

Next, fill an old enamelware or stainless steel pot about 3/4rd full of water and bring it to a boil. {You need to do this in a well ventilated area with a pot specifically used for dyeing wool. You DO NOT want to use one of your everyday pots for dying wool and then use it for cooking because you are using chemicals}.

When the water starts to boil, stir in your dye mix until it is all dissolved. Reduce heat to a simmer.

wool for rug hooking

After your wool has soaked for an hour our so, pull the plug and ring {most} of the water out of your fabric.

dyeing wool rug hooking

Slowly add the wool fabric to the dye pot. Stir the wool around in the dye bath for a minute or two until the color has started to absorb. Let the fabric simmer in the dye bath for 30- 60 minutes. {Some people let their wool soak overnight believing they’ll get a richer, deeper color. I don’t do this.}dyeing wool fabric fro rug hooking

After the wool has absorbed nearly most of the dye, turn off the heat and stir in about 1/4 cup distilled white vinegar to stop the dyeing process and set the color. {Make sure your windows open because this part will stink up the house} Let the wool sit in the vinegar water for an hour or so to cool.

dyeing rug hooking wool
Once the water has cooled, rinse your wool fabric under warm water. Ring dry and then toss the wool into the dryer with an old towel and a dryer sheet {to prevent static cling}. Tumble dry.

how to to dye wool using cushing dyes

Easy peasy, right?

Okay, so that’s it for this week. Let me know if you have any questions.

Next week I will post a tutorial on how I hook my rugs.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Primitive Rug Hooking – Basic Supplies and How I Draw Patterns

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primitive hooked star rug

Last year I rekindled my love for rug hooking and as a result of posting pictures of the primitive style rugs I have been making, a few of you have asked for a tutorial on the subject. But the thing is, rug hooking is a little complicated. Well, actually it’s not, rug hooking is pretty easy once you get the hang of it, but finding the supplies, the inspiration, and all the little tips and tricks, that’s the hard part for a newbie.

primitive hooked rugs

So I’ve decided to break down the ins and outs of rug hooking a bit and do 3 or 4 posts over the next few weeks. This week I am going to focus on the basics. Mainly where to find the supplies you’ll need to get started and once you have those supplies, how to draw out your patterns.

Rug hooking is sort of a unique hobby in that most of what you need to get started, cannot be found in your local craft store. {I LOVE THAT!!!} You want to know why? Because it ‘s one of those hobbies like woodworking, or leather-craft that is not for the faint of heart. Rug hooking is one of those hobbies you have to invest a lot of time into if you want good results. It takes time to find you’re groove, learn from your mistakes, and to realize the absolute beauty of a finished piece is it’s uniqueness and imperfection.

Oh, and it’s expensive too.

Have I scared you off yet? ;)

Scottish rug hooking linen

Okay, let’s get started. 

I prefer to use ivory linen backing for my hooked rugs. For the last 10 years I’ve bought my linen from mmrugwool on Ebay. She’s a great seller and ships quick, and well, you can’t beat the quality. Some people use monk’s cloth because it costs less, but I prefer to use linen because it is nice and sturdy and doesn’t stretch. When I was first starting out I tried using burlap {it’s crap, and it breaks, don’t try it} and then monk’s cloth because it was cheap{er}. I quickly learned starting with a quality product made all the difference ant it was worth every penny.

maggie bonanomi books

Rug Hooking Patterns.

My favorite primitive patterns come from Lori at Notforgotten Farm. She is a total artist. She lives in Virginia with her husband Peter in an old farmhouse and I am in awe of not only her lifestyle, but her dedication to her work. She sells booklets of her drawings {which you can then enlarge to suit your needs} as well as single patterns on her Etsy page. You can also find inspiration from the several rug hooking books available for sale online. You can find the Primitive Rug Hooking Books I am currently selling on Amazon HERE if you are interested.

drawing rug hooking patterns

Drawing Rug Hooking Patterns

A lot of the time I’ll see a design online I like, but that I want to adapt to suit my taste. Buying the pattern doesn’t make sense because I’ll only be incorporating a few of the original elements into my rug design. So when that happens, I draw the pattern free hand or use things from around the house {like bottles and cookie cutters} for the shapes I need.
tracing rug hooking pattern

When I buy paper patterns I will typically enlarge the pattern to the size I need then copy it onto a piece of Tru-Grid interfacing before then transferring the pattern to my rug hooking linen. rug hooking bunny pattern

Buying Ready Made Kits

If this all seems like too much work, Spruce Ridge Studios {the site is slow to load so be patient} is a great source for rug hooking patterns that come hand drawn on your choice of linen or monks cloth. They even sell kits {with hand dyed wool} as well. Buying a kit is probably the most expensive way to get started, but if you are only wanting to hook one rug, it may be the cheapest in the long run because you won’t have to invest in things like books, linen, wool and dyes.

That being said, I personally LOVE hand dying my own wool. It’s cheaper {about $20 a yard vs $45 a yard} and you get to create the colors you really want instead of having to buy what someone else is selling.

primitive hooked rug design

Size Matters

Before I started blogging full time, I sold my primitive hooked rugs on Ebay. Back then I could whip out 2 mini hooked rugs a day {5″ by 8″} and maybe one or two larger ones a month. It was a nice side income and I enjoyed staying up late hooking rugs at night and watching movies by myself when the kids were younger. In all that time, I NEVER made a rug for myself. Although I LOVED the creative process, the rugs never really fit with the Pottery Barn type look of the inside of my home.

In the olden days people would make rugs out of necessity {to use or to sell}, not for pleasure. And it was only last year that I finally made a rug for myself {the one in the top photo}. Finally, after all these years of living/breathing in high maintenance suburbia, my dream home on the East Coast is in sight. As a result of that, I’ve started making larger rugs. Rugs I plan to use at my front and back doors, in the kitchen and in the bedrooms.

primitive turkey rug

I’m getting old, and I’m finally realizing that it’s okay to make something {and keep} it for myself. And that anyone can order something from Pottery Barn, but not everyone is going to invest 200 hours into making a one of a kind rug.

brother serger

Use a Serger to Prevent the Ends of Your Rug Hooking Fabric from Unraveling.

Before I had my serger, I ran over the ends of my rug hooking fabric with the zig zag stitch on my sewing machine to prevent the ends of the fabric from unraveling while I worked on my rugs.

rug hooking frame

Rug Hooking Frames

I’m fairly certain if you were to take a poll of rug hookers, 95% of them use a rug hooking frame. After 10+ years of rug hooking without a frame, last summer I bought Lori Brechlin’s Rug Hooking frame and quickly decided using a frame just wasn’t for me. Her husband makes a great frame, and if I was just learning to rug hook, I would want to learn how to use one. But old habits die hard, LOL and I just can’t get into it.

rug hooking linen on frame

The basic idea behind using a rug hooking frame is that the grips {or teeth} hold your fabric in place while you hook. Lori has a great video HERE of how to use hers.primitive rug hook

Rug Hooking Tool

When I first started rug hooking, I learned how to using a Cushing HookThe Dorr Mill Store currently sells them for around $7. You can spend upwards of $50 for a handmade one, but even after all these years, I’m still use the basic one.

rug hooking wool stash

Where to Buy Wool

All you need to do is google “Rug Hooking Wool” to find a boatload of sites selling both regular, and hand dyed wool.
the wool studio Rebecca erb swatches

But I have a favorite. :)

For the last 10 years or so I’ve been ordering my wool from Rebecca Erb’s Wool Studio. She offers such an amazing assortment of colors and textures {the selection is always changing} that it has become my one shop for buying wool.

New customers can order a 30 swatch New Customer Mailer for $5.00. If you become an active customer by ordering 2 yards {or $42.00}, you will be added to her quarterly swatch mailing list.

The Dorr Mill Store  is also a great source for solid wool. {Their oatmeal wool is one of my favorites}.
hand dyed rug hooking wool

Hand Dyed Wool 

I LOVE hand dying wool. And it deserves a post of its own so I will save that tutorial for next time.

cushing perfection dyes

Cushing’s Perfection Dyes

You’ll need these to dye your own wool. They cost around $2.85 each and it typically takes tiny amounts of several different colors to create the warm, primitive colors I like to use in my rugs. By themselves, most of the colors are too bright for dying in my opinion.

dye spoons for rug hooking
Mini Stainless Steel Measuring Spoons Set 
I use the set above instead of shelling out big bucks for fancy dye spoons.

dying wool with black walnutsOkay, so that’s it for this week. I hope I have not overwhelmed you with too much information.

Next week, I will post a tutorial on how to dye wool and after that, I’ll show you how to use everything mentioned above to hook your own rug.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

22 Things For Kids to Do on a Rainy Day So They’ll Stop Driving You Crazy

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rainy day activities

It’s pouring down rain. You are trapped inside and you are starting to get a little stir crazy. Before you lose your mind, check out this handy dandy list of things that can keep you busy indoors for days on end. There might not be any sunshine, but this list will help you see some light at the end of the tunnel!

1. Build a fort: everything looks cooler from the confines of a fort!

2. Have an Indoor Treasure Hunt. Have fun making up clues, and don’t forget to hide a fun “treasure” at the end.Easy Crafts For Kids - Potato Stamp Wrapping Paper

3.  Make some Homemade Wrapping Paper.

4. Take a bubble bath in your bathing suit.

5. Read a book. {Might I suggest any of these 10 Children’s Series or any one of these 55 Must-Read Books!}Easy Crafts for Kids wooden gnomes

6. Make some Cute Wooden Gnomes.

7. Write in your journal or make “dream/vision” boards.

8. Make a Homemade Pinwheel.Flower Pot Candy Bouquet

9. Get your sugar on with this fun DIY Candy Bouquet.

10. Make a Duct Tape Wallet. Or a Duct tape hair bow or a Duct tape prom dress or you get the picture.Homemade Butter in a Jar - Easy Kids Projects

11. Whip up some butter with this Homemade Butter in a Jar Recipe. Your kids will have a blast shaking away.

12. Make a Party Hat.pattern how to make sweater mittens

13. Sew a Pair of Mittens Out of an Old Sweater.

14. Create a family recipe book. Everyone records their favorite family recipes on note cards and then you decorate those cards and place them in a decorated box or holder.

15. Write and perform a play. You’ll spend all afternoon designing sets and costumes and rehearsing to get it just right.

16. Host a “Fancy Tea Party.” Whip out the fine china and maybe even bake up some of these Chocolate Pistachio Cookies to go with your “tea.”How-to-Recycle-Old-Crayons-

17. Recycle Old Crayons into New Crayons.

18. Have a dance party in your living room. Blast the music and dance your pants off. Limbo anyone?

19. Make some ooey, gooey Caramel Apples.

20. Write letters to friends and family. Actually snail mail letters.How to Make a Kool Aid  Tie Dyed T-Shirt

21. Tie Dye T-Shirts.

22. Take a nap. I saved the best for last!!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure – Old Chair

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old chair with seat cushion

I stopped by the Goodwill on my way home from running errands the other day and spotted this rather nice dinning room chair for $3.99 + tax. The fabric seat was a bit stained and the chair really was not my style, but it was in good shape, so I snatched it up.

removing seat cushion from chair

I had been on the lookout for a good, sturdy chair for my daughter’s desk {which I bartered with Girly Girl for earlier this summer} and I knew with a little paint and fabric, I could make this thrift store find work. After all the chair was in great shape and about 10 times better than the folding chair she had in her room. ;)

rust-oleum ultra cover

I knew we had a can of black spray paint in the garage, so after I removed the seat cushion from the chair,  I sprayed 2 coats of paint on to the chair and left it outside to dry.
removing old fabric from seat cushion

The bedding and drapes in my daughter’s room are grey and white, so when I popped into the Joann’s fabric store I was hoping to find something on sale that would work so this $3.99 chair didn’t turn into some huge and crazy expensive project. ;)  Luckily their home decor was on sale for 60% off and I was able to snag the 5/8 of a yard that I needed for $9.99 + tax.

reupholstered chair grey white black

When all was said and done I spent about an hour working on this project and $15.33 for the fabric and chair. I think it fits perfectly in her room, don’t you? Finding good furniture at thrift stores can be a bit of a challenge sometimes, but if you hang in there, eventually you’ll find what you’re looking for.

~Mavis

thrift store prom dresses goodwill

Do you have an eye for trash or treasure? Send a picture of your awesome find and the story behind how you came upon it and if we post them, you’ll earn a $20 gift card to Amazon.com. The greatest store in the world. Go HERE for complete details.

See More Trash to Treasure Posts:

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Easy Kids Crafts – Homemade Play Dough Recipe

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Homemade Play Dough Recipe

Need a Saturday afternoon activity for the kids?  How about whipping up some homemade play dough?  The way I see it, it’s like two activities in one.  They can help you make it, then they can play with it.

Homemade Play Dough Recipe

You’ll need:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 1/3 cup salt
  • 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • Food coloring

Homemade Play Dough Recipe

Directions:

  1. In a 2 quart saucepan, add flour, cream of tartar and salt.  Add the water and vegetable oil.
  2. Turn the burner on medium low and stir.  It will look like lumpy waffle mix.
  3. It will start to firm up a bit as you stir it.  This will take anywhere from 30 seconds to a couple of minutes, depending on your stove.Homemade Play Dough Recipe
  4. As soon as it starts to firm, add the food coloring.  The dough will start to really get thick and lumpy at this point.  Just keep stirring.Homemade Play Dough Recipe
  5. It will turn to a dough-like consistency and stick to the spoon in one big lump when it’s done.
  6. After the kids are done making homemade memories that will surely last into their adult years, store it in an airtight container just like you would store-bought play dough.Homemade Play Dough Recipe

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Easy Directions for a Handmade Christmas Swag

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simple-directions-for-a-free-and-easy-diy-christmas-swag

Is your husband freaking out because you don’t have a wreath on your front door yet? Well, this is just one of the mini drama’s I had to endure this week… So if you’re in the same boat, you’ll want to check out my latest article for eHow Simple Directions for a Free and Easy DIY Christmas Swag.

I was at my local wholesale club the other day with my husband when we spotted a bunch of Christmas swags for $16.95, and he immediately turned to me and said, “Hey, let’s get one. We don’t have anything on our front door yet.”

“Wait. What? You want to spend $16.95 for a bunch of dead tree branches and a little bit of ribbon? Are you freakin’ nuts? I can make that. For free! Silly husband.”

cutting-holly-sprigs

Pop on over to eHow and read the whole article HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Easy Christmas Craft – DIY Wine Cork Reindeer Ornament

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Wine Cork Reindeer Ornament

Do you have some wine corks lying around {don’t worry, no judgement if you have enough to make enough ornaments for the entire neighborhood} just waiting to be upcycled into these cute {and EASY} reindeer ornaments?  These cute little ornaments take all of about 2 minutes to throw together, and would be adorable hanging around the neck of a bottle of wine {or sparkling cider} as a Christmas gift.

wine-corks

You’ll Need:

Wine cork
Twine, ribbon, yard {whatever you have on hand}
Googly eyes
Tiny red pom-pom
Brown pipe cleaner
Glue gun

Wine Cork Reindeer Ornament

Directions:

Start by attaching a looped piece of twine, ribbon, etc. onto the top of the cork using the glue gun.  Next, wrap the pipe cleaner around the top of the cork and twist it {like a twist tie on a loaf of bread} to get it to stay in place.  Bend the excess to make them look more like antlers.  Next, glue the googly eyes onto the top of the cork, just below the antlers.  Finally, on the end of the cork, glue the small red pom pom for the nose.

Now go pour yourself a Gatorade and recoup from a whole 5 minutes of crafting.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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