DIY Plant Markers From Broken Pots

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turn broken pots into plant markers

I don’t know about you, but I have amassed a pretty large terra cotta pot collection over the years.  I love them.  They  naturally regulate water to the plant, and as long as you take care of them, they will last for years.  The only downside is that they do occasionally break–after all, they are clay and exposed to the elements year after year.  It kind of kills me to throw them away, so when I decided to make a few of them into plant markers.

terra cotta flower pots

You’ll Need:

Terra Cotta Pots
Black Sharpie
Hammer

broken terra cotta pots

Directions:

Break off portions of the mouth of the pot.  You will want to use the top portion of the pot so that you have nice smooth edges, rather than jagged broken ones stick up waiting to attack you in your garden.  I broke the pots into desired pieces with a hammer.  I just lightly tapped where I wanted to break the pot to even it out a bit.  Write the name of your plant with a sharpie and then bury the base of the broken portion of the pot in the dirt along side the plant.

DIY Plant Markers From Broken Pots

Waaaay better than throwing out the broken pots, don’t you think?  {If you totally love the idea, but don’t have any terra cotta pots, the little ones are cheap, so you can still make the markers.} ;)

~Mavis

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DIY How to Make Redneck Wine Glasses

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DIY Redneck wine glasses

The summer entertaining season is right around the corner and now is a great time to get a few of those arts and crafts projects out of the way. This morning I made a set of DIY Redneck Wine glasses for one of my friends. She had mentioned having seen some redneck wine glasses on Amazon a while back and thought they were cool

Well guess what? Her birthday is coming up and so I made her a set.

Hot Diggety Dog!

DIY redneck wine glasses craft

How to Make Redneck Wine Glasses

Supplies 

6 Canning Jars
6 Glass Candlesticks {I found mine at the Dollar Store}
Epoxy Quick Set Glue {Home Depot or Amazon sells it}
Sandpaper {I used medium grit}

redneck wine glasses tutorial

Directions

Use a piece of sandpaper to scratch up the rim of the glass candlesticks {this will help the epoxy adhere the canning jars and the candlesticks together}. Wash, then dry the candlesticks to remove any dust.

diy how to make redneck wine glasses

Set the mason jar, bottom side up, on your work surface. Carefully place a generous amount of Epoxy glue on the bottom of the mason jar.

how to make redneck wine glasses DIY

Place the candlestick on top of the canning jar and press the glass pieces together. Let your new redneck wine glass sit undisturbed for 24 hours before using or gifting.

Yee- Haw!  How easy was that?

~Mavis

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Dye Eggs With Natural Ingredients

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how to dye easter eggs naturally

Easter is right around the corner so I thought I would re-post this easy How to dye eggs naturally post.

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Did you know you can dye eggs with natural ingredients?

Since my chickens lay brown & green eggs, last year I decided to splurge and buy 2 dozen white eggs at the store and give it a try.  I was worried if I used the brown eggs the dye would not be as vibrant, and in the end, I’m glad I went the white eggs {even if they were not as fresh as homegrown laid eggs}.

vinegar

The process is surprisingly easy. Here are the simple directions:

Blue Eggs: Combine 2-3 cups chopped red cabbage, 3 tablespoons of vinegar and 4 cups of water and simmer for 3o minutes.  Drain colored water in a large bowl and steep the desired number of hard-boiled eggs in the colored water for 3 hours {less time if you don’t want dark blue eggs}.

Yellow Eggs: Combine 2 teaspoons turmeric, 3 tablespoons of vinegar and 4 cups of water and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Remove from heat and steep the desired number of hard-boiled eggs in the colored water for 2 hours {less time if you don’t want dark yellow eggs}.

Red Eggs: Combine 1 cup shredded beets {2-3 beets} , 3 tablespoons of vinegar and 4 cups of water and simmer for 3o minutes.  Drain colored water in a large bowl and steep the desired number of hard-boiled eggs in the colored water for 3 hours {less time if you don’t want dark pink eggs}.

blue eggs

*Keep in mind that the longer you keep your eggs in the colored water, the deeper your eggs shells will turn out.

naturally dyed easter eggs

Dry your eggs on a cooling rack.  Once the eggs have completely dried, use a paint brush to brush away any extra bits. See, I told you it was easy.

how to dye easter eggs naturally

Have you done this before?  What did you think?  Pretty easy huh?

Looking for the ceramic egg rack featured in this photo? Amazon has it HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Make Polka Dot Easter Eggs

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How to Make Polka Dot Easter EggsYou know all of those stickers that come with Easter Egg Dye Kits?  They seem like they are going to look super cute, but they always leave you wanting?  Here’s a new way to put them to use:  polka dot Easter eggs.

How to Make Polka Dot Easter EggsYou’ll need:

Round stickers
Hard-boiled eggs
Easter Egg Dye
Cups

How to Make Polka Dot Easter EggsDirections:

Place round stickers on the eggs, in whatever pattern you choose.  Make sure to push them down completely, so that no dye can find it’s way underneath the stickers.  Dip the egg into whichever color you choose and allow it to marinate until desired color.  Pull out egg and allow it to dry completely on a paper towel.  When egg is dry, carefully peel off stickers to reveal your polka dotted egg.  If you want the polka dots to be a color other than white, give the whole egg a dip in a different color.

How to Make Polka Dot Easter EggsEasy pleasy, right?

Happy Easter,

Mavis

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How to Recycle Old Crayons into New Rainbow Crayons

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How to Recycle Old Crayons

So, every year, for years and years, when the kids brought their backpacks home on the last day of school, I would dump their crayon stubs into a rubbermaid shoe box.  Then, when we went on road trips or whatever, I’d throw it in, the kids could painstakingly unwrap the nubs and continue to color with them.  No matter how many road trips we went on, the crayons only seemed to multiply.

Now, after all of these years, I still have the box of crayons, and no chubby little hands to hold them.  So, what’s a girl to do?  Make ‘em new again, that’s what.   Then, when friends bring their kids over, I will pull them out and stun and amaze them with my cool crayons.  Ah, it’s good to be Mavis.  Ha!

broken crayons

You’ll Need:

Crayons
Silicone mold {or muffin tin would work, but it might be harder to get the crayons out, so I would line it with foil cups}

recycled Rainbow Crayons

Directions:

Peel all of the remaining paper off of the crayons {I’m not going to lie, this part isn’t fun, so if you want to solicit the help of the kiddos, I highly suggest it}.  Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.  Chop all of the crayons into small pieces.  Fill the mold, with about 1″ of crayons.  Bake for 15-20 minutes {time really varies, so check them and remove them when wax is melted}.  Allow the mold to cool completely, then pop them out of the mold.

Rainbow Crayons, Recycled Crafts, How to Recycle Old Crayons into New Rainbow Crayons

Super easy, right?

~Mavis

How to Recycle Old Crayons into New Rainbow Crayons

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Jelly Bean Mason Jar – Upcycling a Chick Feeder

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Jelly Bean Mason Jar

There is something so poetic about a chick feeder becoming an Easter jelly bean dispenser.  Poetic and easy.  What could be better?

Supplies You’ll Need:

  • A chick feeder base {Farm stores carry these}
  • Clean mason jar
  • Jelly beans
  • Funnel

Jelly Bean Mason Jar chicke feeder

Wash the chick feeder in hot soapy water.  Dry completely.

Jelly Bean Mason Jar

Funnel jelly beans into the mason jar, leaving enough head space to easily screw on the base of the chick feeder.

Jelly Bean Mason Jar

Screw on the base, while the jar is still upright.

Jelly Bean Mason Jar chick feeder

Flip it over and proceed to eat all of the purple and pink jelly beans out of the feeder before the kids have a chance to get at it. Now how easy was that?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Kids Easter Crafts – Dying Eggs with Rubber Bands

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Kids Easter Crafts - Dying Eggs with Rubber BandsWhen I saw these cute dyed Easter Eggs my friend Jenn made, I knew I had to make some.  After you fit on the rubberbands, little hands still get to do all of the dipping and dying.  The result is ridiculously cute eggs with minimal effort–AND kids who got to be involved the whole time.

Kids Easter Crafts - Dying Eggs with Rubber BandsYou’ll Need:

Hard-boiled eggs
Egg dying tablets
Cups
Rubberbands

Kids Easter Crafts - Dying Eggs with Rubber BandsDirections:

Start by wrapping the rubberbands around the eggs.  You can do it in any pattern that suits your fancy.  Dip the egg in your chosen color of dye until it is as dark as you want it.  Lay it on a paper towel to dry.  When the egg is dry, you can dip it in a new color if you want to dye the stripes that the rubberband left, or you can add more rubberbands and continue to layer color until your eggs is exactly the way you want it.

Kids Easter Crafts - Dying Eggs with Rubber Bands

When you are finished, lay all of the eggs out to dry and sit back and wait for your mother-in-law to awe at how clever and crafty you are with your kids.  Ha!

Happy Easter,

Mavis

 

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Easter Crafts For Kids – Marshmallow Peeps

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easy easter crafts for kids peeps

~Happy Easter to one of my favorite PEEPS~

I posted this easy peasy Easter Craft last year and thought I would share it again for those of you who might have missed it.

All you need are a few “snack size” ziplock baggies, a few boxes of brightly colored marshmallow peeps, and this free printable peeps topper.

Simply place 1 row of peeps in a snack size ziplock bag and close it tight.  Then staple {or glue} the printable peeps topper and you are good to go.

Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Garden Projects For Kids – How to Make a Seed Tape

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how to make a seed tape

These simple seed tapes are so much fun for little kids to make. I wanted to share the tutorial again for those of you with young ones who might have missed it the first time around. 

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If you’re looking for a fun rainy day garden project to do with your kids, or if you are a new gardener and are concerned about planting tiny seeds like carrots and lettuce in the garden, I have the perfect project for you.

A seed tape. You can typically find seed tapes in the gardening section of your local store this time of year, but they usually run about $3 to $5 and half the seeds a a normal seed packet would.

make your own glue

How to Make a Seed Tape

Supplies

  • Toilet Paper
  • Flour
  • Water
  • Seeds
  • Bamboo Skewer or Toothpick

First figure out how long you want to make your seed tape.  My garden boxes are 8 feet long so I used 8 feet of toilet paper.  The great thing about seed tape is you can make it as long {or as short} as you need to accommodate your garden space.

Seed tapes can be made with any type of small seeds. Peas and beans are easy for children to plant with their tiny fingers, but seeds like carrots, lettuce and radishes are quite a bit harder for them to grasp.

how to make a seed tapeDirections

Make a simple paste out of flour and water.  You want the “paste” to be the consistency of glue. Next use a chopstick or a bamboo skewer and carefully dab a little paste onto the toilet paper.

Add 2 seeds to the dab of paste {I like to use 2 seeds just in case one does not germinate}. If you are unsure as to how far apart to paste your seeds, simply look at the back of the seed packet for instructions.  Most carrot seeds need to be planted 3″ apart.

Once the paste has dried, roll up your seed tape and head out to the garden.

how to make a seed tape kids projects

Lay the seed tape down and cover with dirt {refer to your seed packet to find out how deep}. For carrots cover with 1/8″ of soil. Water and care for your newly planted seeds just as you would had they been sowed directly in the garden. The toilet paper should dissolve in about a week.

Yee-Haw! Gardening is cool, even for kids!

~Mavis

gardening projects for kids

For more simple garden ideas to do with kids, check out Gardening Projects for Kids.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

10 Serger Tips for Beginners

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10 Serger Tips for Beginners

For my birthday, I splurged and bought myself a serger.  I’ve always wanted one, but never really wanted to spend the money.  They are pretty much awesome for getting a professional, store-bought finish though, so I decided it was time.  Sergers sew, cut, and finish seams all in one step–it also wraps the thread around the front and the back of the fabric, which allows to to hold up much better through repeated washes.  It kind of takes the human error out of sewing.

serger handbook

If you’ve never used one before, here are a couple of tips and a great video to get you started:

  1. Read the manual and watch the video {if it came with one}.  I know, I know, it’s not a profound tip, but seriously, when is the last time you read the manual of something you bought from front to back?  This is one of those things you really need to read the manual on.  Get to know your serger.  Take it to dinner and movie if you have to–just really get to know it individually.
  2. Thread the machine over and over.  Unless you have a “self-threading” model, practice threading your machine over and over.  Threading a serger can take forever at first, getting proficient at it will help you actually get to the sewing a lot faster.
  3. You cannot sew on pins.  Because a serger sews and cuts, you will need to either learn to pin much, much higher than where you were actually sewing or sew without them.brother serger lock 1034D
  4. Go slow.  This is hard at first, if you are used to zipping through something with a sewing machine, but if you get going too fast, remember a serger cuts too, so you can’t just go back and rip out the seam and start over.  You have to be slow and calculated.
  5. Clean the lint out of the serger frequently.  Keep your investment {both the serger and the fabric  you’re sewing} in great shape by making sure the serger runs tip top.
  6. Practice on scrap fabric.  Pay attention how you line up your scrap fabric, how fast you are moving, how to accurately you’re sewing.  If you make a mistake with scrap fabric during the learning process, you won’t be out anything.toldi-lock serger thread
  7. Buy good quality thread.  It will sew soooo much better if you just suck it up and buy the higher quality thread.  No catching, no breaking–just happy, happy serging.
  8. Watch the blade, and not the needle as you sew.  The blade is doing the most permanent damage, so guide your fabric based on that.
  9. If you are in the market for a serger, make sure to choose one that is easy to thread.  Historically, people have dreaded getting a serger for that reason.  Technology has come a long way, though, and they are much, much easier now {especially if you do a little research}.  Once you have found a serger, make sure to do step #2.
  10. Sergers don’t backstitch, so remember to knot off your thread when you finish.

There’s been a learning curve for sure, but now that I am getting the hang of the different types of stitches, I think this serger thing is going to rock.

~Mavis

serger

Brother 1034D 3 or 4 Thread Serger with Easy Lay In Threading with Differential Feed

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