Tacoma Urban Chicken Coop Tour 2012

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

If you are in the Seattle/Tacoma area and own chickens or have been thinking about raising chickens in your backyard, you’ll want to cough up $5 to take a tour of local chicken abodes this weekend.  I went on the Urban Coop Tour last year and came home with a bunch of ideas for the garden so I’ll be buying a ticket again this year. Since the tour changes every year you are bound to get inspired and see new things. Who knows, maybe we will run into each other.

Go HERE to find out more about the Tacoma 2012 Urban Coop Tour.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Mavis Goes to The Mother Earth News Fair 2012

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Yesterday, The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I took a field trip to the Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Washington.  Admission was $30 a head or FREE if you donated an old cell phone.  So guess who asked around and found 2 old cell phones so they could get in to the fair for free?

There was a ton of stuff to see, including live demonstrations from the Fort Nisqually History Museum. Oy! I wonder if wearing a hoop skirt hurts.

They had yurts.  I’m not sure how much they cost, but they are actually pretty roomy inside.  This one even had a little wood stove/heater and a bed.  Pretty neat-o if you ask me.

Once inside the pavilion, there were a ton of farm animals to see. Cows, goats, alpacas, lambs, and pretty little piggies too.

They even had a few chickens on display.  This little girl was telling me a story about roosters. It was very exciting.  It was great to see so many families with young children at the fair.  In my opinion, although there were fewer farm animals than the Big Puyallup Fair in the fall, this fair was much better.  Very low key, no rides or carnival games, but loads and loads of workshops, demonstrations and it just had a really wholesome feel about it.  This was my first time at a Mother Earth News Fair, and I loved it.

Oh, and guess what?  Some man was giving away FREE bantam chickens.  Who could say no to FREE chickens?  Not us!  Wahoo!  I’m excited to see how tiny their eggs are.  We’ll keep you posted.

Peace Out Girl Scouts,

Mavis

*If you would like to attend the Mother Earth News Fair, go HERE to find out more info.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Raising Backyard Chickens: How to Get Rid of Nuisance Chickens

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Yesterday, I received a phone call from Chino the Handyman letting me know he had finally finished building his backyard chicken coop. OH. HAPPY.DAY. Before he could finish talking I cut him off and told him to come on over and The Girl and I would give him four of our older chickens for his coop.

Originally we were only going to give Chino two chickens, Buff and Peter.  Our two trouble makers.  But Lucy and Goosey had been acting up lately so we decided to give them the boot   give them to Chino as well.

Chino and his four little monkeys could not have been happier.  Of course there are two sides to every story, and the chickens may not be so thrilled about the relocation.  But I sure am.

The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I sent Chino home with a bag of straw and a small supply of chicken feed and are hoping for the best.  We’ll go over to Chino’s house in a few days to check on the hens to see how they are adjusting.

But for now, we are just thrilled beyond our wildest dreams to have gotten rid of found Buff the Wayward Chicken a new home.

See you later Buff!

Have you been thinking about getting a few chickens for your backyard?  Check out the book A Chicken in Every Yard: The Urban Farm Store’s Guide to Chicken Keeping By Robert Litt.  Amazon currently has the book on sale for $12.03

*Amazon prices can change at anytime.

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Raising Backyard Chickens: Chino The Handyman Builds a Coop

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

My neighbor Chino the Handyman has been working on a backyard chicken coop, for what seems like forever.  My neighbor Girly Girl, {Chino’s wife} heard backyard chickens are all the rage, and had to have some. The Girl and I have been patiently waiting for him to complete the coop {we have our motives}.  He’s been at it for 5 weekends in a row now.

When Girly Girl first started talking to me about chickens it was around mid-February.  We had just brought home our first batch of baby chicks.  And although Girly Girl thought the chicks were cute, she was definitely not interested in raising chicks.  She wanted full grow chickens when it came time to fill her coop.

So when she half jokingly asked me if I had any “extra chickens” she could buy from me, I quickly offered her two.  For FREE.

Buff the Wayward Chicken and Peter the Trouble Maker.

“Oh sure, I said.  They are great egg layers.  Green and brown eggs.  You’ll love them!”

“Really?  Sweet.  I’ll tell the kids.”

So every Saturday since Chino has been working on the coop, The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I call him for a status update. Hoping, praying, that he finally has the coop completed.

This was last Saturdays conversation

“I just installed the insulation and the roof.”

“Huh?  You had a roof the last time we were up there.”

“Roofing, I installed the roofing, you know, shingles.”

“Ah.  Chino, maybe you could get it finished if you would just stop adding vending machines and manicure stations for the chickens.  They’re CHICKENS… Not tween girls.”  C’mon Chino, get  er done!”

“Geez, your starting to sound like my wife.”

“It has been 5 weeks Chino.  I could have walked to Texas and back by now.  Do you think you might possibly have it done this weekend?”

“I hope so.  Call me on Saturday and I’ll let you know if it’s time to bring up the chickens.”

“Okay, talk to you then.”

_____________

So what do you think?

Do chicken coops need insulation, tiled floors and weather vanes?  Or am I just being impatient?

Thinking about building a chicken coop?  I bet if you tried real hard you could have one built in a weekend.  Check out Backyard Chickens’ Guide to Coops and Tractors.  Amazon currently has it on sale for $14.20.

*Amazon prices can change at anytime.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Unusual Chicken Coop Designs

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Will you be getting chickens this year?
Looking for a few housing options? Is money burning a hole in your pocket?  Here are a few coops I think are pretty neat-o.
Photo Credit

Nogg: House your chickens in style for only £1,950 or $3,249.

I love my chickens, but not that much.

Photo Credit

This unusual chicken coop was photographed at the Hampton Court Flower Show in England in 2008.

Photo Credit

If Ina Garten had chickens, this would be her coop.

Photo Credit

Maurice Chicken Coop Car:  This old 1970 Morris Traveler was headed for the junkyard when Brit Michael Thompson turned upcycled it into a classy coop for his hens.

And last but not least…

Photo Credit

Reclaimed Cedar Chicken Coop $895.  Wowza!  I think I should find me some old cedar boards and set up shop!

If you have a garden and are thinking about getting some chickens, you might want to read Free-Range Chicken Gardens: How to Create a Beautiful, Chicken-Friendly YardBy Jessi Bloom.  Amazon currently has it on sale for $12.22 and the book is full of chicken-keeping basics, simple garden plans, tips on attractive fencing options, the best plants and plants to avoid, and step-by-step instructions for getting your chicken garden up and running.

Yee-Haw!

*Amazon prices are subject to change at anytime.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Introduce New Chickens into Your Existing Flock

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

This morning after I put the tomato incident behind me, The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I introduced all of baby chicks to the older chickens.  Introducing new chickens into your existing flock can be kind of tricky. So I thought I would tell you how we have handled it each spring.

When the chicks are a few weeks old we take them out one by one for introduce them to the older chickens for a minute or two so they can get a good look at them.  When the chicks have reached 8-10 weeks we then set up a sort of “chicken meet and greet.”  This year we attached a 4 foot by 10 chicken run right up against the older chickens yard.  We let the younger chickens play next to the older ones for a few hours each day.

By introducing the younger chicks sort of half-way, it helps to alleviate the older chickens from pecking the younger ones.  By the time we place the younger ones in with the older hens {at about 12 weeks old} the novelty of them has pretty much worn off and they don’t get pecked at nearly as much.  I think going nice and slow is the way to do it if you have the space.

Do you have chickens?  What has your experience with introducing new chickens into you existing flock been?


If you are thinking about raising chickens, Amazon currently has The Joy of Keeping Chickens on sale for $10.17 and it is packed with all sorts of great information.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Keep Chickens Out of Your Garden: Part 2

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Over the weekend I was able to work on Chicken Fort Knox, and I must say I am rather pleased with the results so far.  Not one chicken has escaped.  Not one. Nada.  At this point it’s still looking a bit ghetto with the downed logs at the base of chicken run, but I’m making progress.

Not only did I relocate the chickens away from the house, but I added BIRD NETTING to the top of the chicken run. Holy canolies Batman, why didn’t I think of this before?  It was pure genius I tell you.

Now the only possible way out is via underground tunnel.  Buff the Wayward chicken is beside herself.

On Sunday, my neighbor Mrs. Hillbilly came over to check it out.  She was impressed.  Mrs. Hillbilly even gave me a few unsolicited suggestions on how to make the chicken Shangri-La a little more appealing.  In the end we decided I needed to add some sort of hedge {viburnum perhaps} to the base of the run and a flowering tree or bush to one particular corner.

I love Mrs. Hillbilly, she’s a little bit country, and a little bit rock n’ roll all in one. Plus she likes to barter.  Which is a major plus.

See those eggs?  Mrs. Hillbilly took them home, and left me with a sack of peppermint patties.

She loves me.

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Raising Backyard Chickens As Pets

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

It’s been over a month since I have posted photos of the baby chicks we brought home around mid- Februaury so I thought I would give you an update.

My Oh My have they grown!

Big Martha {Barred Plymouth Rock}

2 week assessment: Big Martha is amazingly calm. Nothing seems to bother Big Martha. I think she might be the highest in the pecking order of this bunch. I love her, she’s so friendly and sweet.

7 week assessment:  Big Martha loves The Girl Who Thinks She’s A Bird and helps with her homework everyday. She has quickly become our “favorite” bird this spring.

Buffy {Buff Orpington}

2 week assessment: Buffy is a total fruitcake. This one is going to be trouble.

7 week assessment: Ditto

Squeakers {Sex-Link}

2 week assessment: Always wants to be held. Until you hold her. Then she wants to be put down. But as soon as you put her down she comes up to your hand and wants to be picked up. Another fruitcake.

7 week assessment: She pecks at anything and everything.  I think she would peck me to death if given the chance.

Peanut {Easter Egger}

2 week assessment: Peanut is a fun bird. Very curious, likes to be held and friendly.

7 week assessment: This is the #2 bird of the bunch.  When she is not dive bombing the other chickens she is rolling around in the dirt.  Goofy, but loveable.

Here is a picture of our second batch of spring chickens at just 1 week old.  They two have grown past the “ugly duckling” stage and are starting to feather out.

Brown Fatty {Partridge Cochin}

2 week assessment: Very shy.

6 week assessment: Still very shy and withdrawn. Until you pick her up, then she wiggles and tries to get away.  The jury is still out on this one.

White Fatty {Cochin}

2 week assessment: Very quite and shy.  She likes to hide in the corner.

6 week assessment:  White Fatty has settled in and now likes to jump around like a crazy and tries to fly.  She has a lot of spunk and she’s a little goofy too.

Baby Fat {Australorp}

2 week assessment:  Just about the most curious bird on the planet.  She is always poking her head out to see what is going on.

6 week assessment:  Baby Fat is still rather curious, but unlike Black Fatty {our older Australorp} she doesn’t like to be held.

I was hoping my neighbor Girly Girl would have her new chicken coop built by now and I’d be able to ship off Buff the Wayward Chicken and Peter the escape artist. However she is still waiting for her husband Chino the Handyman to build her a coop.

Let’s hope it’s soon.

I think I’ll wait about another month or so until the baby chicks have grown a bit before I put them in with the Big Girls.  Keeping chickens as pets is a blast, they all have such different personalities and are {for the most part} very easy going.

Plus you can steal their eggs.

If you’d like to learn more about keeping chickens as backyard pets, Amazon has The Joy of Keeping Chickens on sale for $10.17.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food: Mavis Plants Onions In The Garden, Again

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Yesterday it rained, and then it hailed, and then it rained some more. So I stayed inside, read emails* and baked all day instead of working in the garden like I had planned. If Mother Nature does not deliver a roasting hot summer this year to make up for our chilly, rainy, and unpredictable late winter weather, I think Mr. H and I will have to break out the sling shots and start launching rocks towards her home in the sky very, very soon.

I want to get this show on the road. I want to grow food. But first we need some heat.  I am so incredibly ready to get this garden going and to try to grow 2,000 lbs of fruits and vegetables in my backyard.  I’m ready to start waking up at 4am to drink a few cups of tea before heading out to water the garden before the sun rises. I want to hear the birds chirping, and frogs croaking and to get a little dirt under my nails. I want to turn my phone off and just breath. I see a lot of work ahead of me and I’m excited.  Excited to be back doing what I love. Planting a seed and seeing a result. Fruition = Bliss.

But first, I have to secure the homestead.  Buff the Wayward Chicken and friends escaped their chicken run a few days ago and ate all my onion starts.  Luckily they didn’t find the leeks. To say I wasn’t very happy about shelling out $10 for 500 new onion starts would be an understatement.

Not to mention the whole process of replanting 500 onions {I bought a little extra this time to be on the safe side}.  If you have never had to replant anything before because you don’t have chickens, then consider yourself lucky.

Peace Out Girl Scouts,

I’m off to play in the dirt today.

Mavis

*If you left a comment on another site for me and it was deleted, I’m sorry.  I have no control over it and I cannot leave a comment myself as I have been blocked. But thank you for your kind words, even if I did not get a chance to read them myself.

Buy One Get One FREE Crush (Up to $1.59)Go HERE to print a Buy 1 Get 1 Free Coupon for Orange Crush Soda.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Keep Chickens Out of Your Garden: Part 1

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Yesterday, as I opened the garden gate, I could not believe what I saw.

Buff the Wayward Chicken and her band of merry makers  hooligans had escaped.  Not only had they busted out of the more than adequately sized chicken run, they had dug, scratched, and pulled up nearly everything in sight in the lower garden.  Plus, they ate all of the onion starts I had planted a few weeks ago at the base of my raspberries.  All 300 of them.

How nice.

Luckily, I was able to shoo them away before too much damage was done.  Had they of made their way to the upper garden and destroyed by newly planted garden beds, it might have been curtains for all of them.

So what is a suburban backyard farmer to do?

Move the coop.  As far away from the garden as possible.

And that is exactly what The Girl Who Thinks She’s A Bird and I did as soon as the chickens went to bed.

Last night, after the chickens had made their way into the coop, The Girl locked the door on the Eglu.  Then, in a calculated and stealth like fashion, we jacked the thing up and rolled it {uphill} to its new location.

Siberia.

When the chickens woke up this morning and sauntered out of the coop, they were a wee bit confused. Sure the door to the coop was open, but the pen doors were locked.

Today’s project: Create an escape proof chicken run. 

When I am done securing the new Chicken Fort Knox headquarters, Buff will not be able to escape, and the vegetables will be safe.

All.Summer.Long.

To be continued…

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Recipes Garden Frugal Canning Chickens Travel