Chicken Coop Photos from Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

vicky and her chickenVicky and Buttercup

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples home and garden pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rockin’ backyard this summer. Keep them coming!

Check out these cool chicken coop photos and the stories behind them Vicky from Winston-Salem, North Carolina sent in:

chicken coop picturesHi there, Mavis!

In February of last year, after months of online research, I purchased four 6-week-old Buff Orpington pullets.  Until October, they lived in a Tractor Supply chicken coop and run.  I let them out a couple of times a day, but they were getting a little “cooped up” (nyuk nyuk) in there.  So we bought a Wichita-style chicken coop and everyone is happy.
wooden chicken coop
I live in the city and am allowed a maximum of 5 hens (no roosters) with very strict rules about their living situation (3 square feet/chicken for the coop; 10 square feet/chicken for the run, which must be enclosed).
buff orpington chickens
My girls are Buttercup (I’m holding her in the photo), Marigold, Sunflower, and Daisy.  They are all Buff Orpingtons.  Our winters are generally mild, but even after our recent frigid temperatures (it dropped to 5 degrees!), they have continued to lay regularly.  Such good girls!

chicken coop interior

Check out all the fine art! Who wouldn’t feel inspired to lay a few eggs in here? ;) ~ Vicky
old licence plate frames

Wow Vicky, I would have never thought to hang photographs of eggs in my coop to inspire my hens. I think you might be on to something.  With all this cold weather we’ve been having, I’m willing to try anything to get my girls to lay a few more eggs.

Thanks for sending in your story,

~Mavis

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Chicken Coop Pictures from Sandpoint, Idaho

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

chicken coop and chickensA big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

Check out these chicken coop photos an story Holly from Sandpoint, Idaho sent in:

insulated chicken coopHi Mavis!

I’ve been enjoying all the photos of chicken coops that are being sent to you. Wow and amazing. What fun to see how everyone takes care of their girls!

chicken coop in winterI’ve been a reader of your blog for a year and live near Sandpoint, Idaho………yeah, snow country…….and when we decided to get chickens last Spring we thought we knew everything…..haha….but soon found out we didn’t. We have two Rhode Island Reds, two Barred Rocks, two Golden Sex Links and one Araucana {yay for blue-green eggs!}

We ordered a pre-made coop and run on the internet. Found out later it was made in China and totally uninsulated. Yep. Pretty darn cute……but all looks and no substance. It was fine until the weather turned cold in the Fall and our seven girls got bigger.

rhode island red chickenThe temps in the coop got pretty darn cold at night……and the girls were cramped. Don’t ever take as gospel what the coop manufacturers say as far as how many chickens a coop will handle.

My HH decided around October that this cutesy coop would not work through our winters here. We quickly came up with a simple shed roof coop plan of our own with windows (hey, happy hens gotta look out!) so it would look cute on the edge of my garden. He built it in record time before the first snowfall. We have a friend who now calls it the Ritz. Funny.

The new insulated coop is just 6 x 8. But it’s warm and keeps them happy. We have plans to build an enclosed run when the snow and ice melt. For now the girls seem to be content…..except I’m not when they hop their fence into my garden! Even with the snow they love to peck at my growing garlic. We need to put up a wire on the fence so they can’t jump over……it seems like there are always more to-dos with chickens!!!!!

backyard garden with snowThis long-term Arizona girl {me} is having an interesting time with snow and cold and chickens……….but it’s all so do-able. Not always fun but do-able. They’re happy…..and if they’re happy then I’m happy.

chickens in gardenI started a blog last year …..www.dirtanddenim.com ……..to chronicle our garden and chicken adventures here in snow country.

I totally enjoy your blog and humor and pics and Lucy. Keep up the good work!

Holly

roosting chickensIf you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Chicken Coop Photos from Tacoma, Washington

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

chicken coop photosCheck out this email Sydney from Tacoma sent in about her chicken coop. My favorite is the hand washing station they included. I’m totally going to have to steal that idea. Here’s what she had to say:

Hi Mavis! I stumbled across your blog right before Christmas (shamelessly did a Google search for what to give your chickens for Christmas). We are still weathering our first year as chicken newbies (other adjectives would be obsessed, hoarders, chick mama, etc.) and I was looking to see what others did, and admittedly to see if I was crazy. I giggled when I saw that you were also from the Puget Sound area, and did have treat ideas!

white chicken

I had only wanted 3 [chickens], and my husband told me he wanted nothing to do with them, but loved me so he helped me out anyway. Our 3 girls quickly grew from just Brahmas and an Orpington, to Silkies, an EE and a Bantam something or other, and we reached our allowed limit. Needless to say, we love them. They are crazy and silly and give me the stink eye when I haven’t talked to them at least a dozen times during the day!

chicken coop pictures

We built our coop this year using cedar siding.  We made the mistake, however, of not having real plans and just winging it, so there may have been an easier way to do things. But the girls are happy and safe now, and that’s all that matters.

cool chicken coop ideas
Without a huge sprawling yard, we wanted something that would be appealing right off the patio, and also attractive for our beloved neighbors to see from their yard well.  Still learning and changing things up to address the good ol muddy clay we get over here in winter.
outdoor garden sink
And yes, we made an outdoor hand washing station to drain into a bucket, and that white thing on the coop run door is a hand sanitizer station like they use in hospitals. Can you tell I used to work in a hospital?
Cheers,
Sydney
chicken

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Homemade Flock Blocks For Chickens

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

My friend Heather from Massachusetts recently whipped up a batch of homemade flock blocks for her chickens. Today she is sharing her recipe. Thanks Heather!!

homemade flock blocks for chickensThis is so easy you won’t even believe it!

Baby it is ccccold outside!  Last night we got our first storm here in New England. So yesterday I cleaned the coop, filled up their food, cleaned their water out, and made a batch of homemade flock blocks!

The great thing about flock blocks is they are made of good stuff for the birds, easier than making cookies, they make your house smell great, and I get a sense of job-well-done because I made it myself.

The only bags of seed mixes my local feed store had were big enough to last me three winters worth of flock blocks, but that’s ok because each bag was $5-7 which is almost half the price of one flock block from the store. The other ingredients you probably have laying around.
homemade flock blockIngredients:
4 cups scratch grains {usually cracked corn, oats, barley, etc – or whatever mix they have at your feed store}
2 cups layer feed
2 cups oats {regular oatmeal oats}
1 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup whole wheat flour {whatever you have in your cupboard is fine}
1/2 cup wheat germ {I had wheat bran so I used that instead}
1/2 cup crushed egg shells or oyster grit
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp cayenne pepper {good for their immune system}
6 eggs {weird I know, but think of it like a gelling unit}
1 cup molasses
1 cup solid-at-room-temperature oil {shortening or coconut}

DIY Homemade Flock Blocks For Chickens
Directions
Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Mix the dry ingredients in one bowl and the wet in another bowl. The next step is kinda messy so lay out whatever pans you will be using. The pan size doesn’t really matter but it will affect your cook time so take that into account. I chose a small size so I can give them treats more often and… I have a whopping flock of four! Ha!

Now take off your rings and mix together with your hands – trust me, this is the only easy way to do this. :) When you’re done mixing you should be able to squeeze the mixture and it stays in a form.

homemade flock blocks for chickensNext, load up your pans. And press the mixture down tight and flatten so it’s smooth on top to make your type-A self happy. :) If you want to hang your flock blocks {you can also just lay it on a plate} poke a hole in it with a chopstick so you can thread it with twine later.

Bake at 325 degrees for 30 mins. It will turn a dark brown and the hole will look like it’s disappeared – it hasn’t, just poke it again. This part is really important – let it cool for HOURS. If you try to remove them from the pans while it’s hot, the flock blocks will fall apart and you may cry a little {ask me how I know}.

Run a knife around the edges because the molasses makes a little crust. Once it’s cooled – I let mine cool overnight {overnight is probably not necessary but I was traumatized from the previous attempt}, thread some garden twin through the hole and you’re done.

homemade flock blocks for chickens

Roadrunner was a big fan of the flock block – Agnus and Mr. {really a misses} Bubblesworth where too busy checking out the camera {Goldfinger is camera shy}.

Tip: don’t leave your flock block in the rain – it will dissolve.

cinder block garden cute chicken coop design

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Backyard Chickens – Thinning the Flock

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

amazon prime box

Yesterday, The Girl and I finally got around to packing up a few of our chickens. We were suppose to bring the hens over to Girly Girl’s House a few weeks ago, but it was so cold outside I didn’t want to traumatize the chickens so we waited until yesterday to move them.

chickens in a box

Luckily Girly Girl only lives a few houses away so we were able to put all 6 of the chickens in a box and drive them over to her house. buff orpington pullet

Buffy, the sweetest Buff Orpington ever, didn’t want to go. In fact she clung to The Girl until Girly Girl’s daughter came over and pried her away.

buff orpington pullets

I think she’ll be okay.

backyard chickensAnd the other chickens? Well, I don’t think they cared one way or another.

Blue Laced Red Wyandottes

When we brought our baby chicks home in early September we were planning on only giving 4 of them to Girly Girl once they were old enough. But she wanted more and we gave in. But to tell you the truth, after having 20 {YES 20!} chickens in my backyard for the past few months, it was kind of nice to be able to finally get the flock thinned out a little. Now all we need to do is find a home for the 2 roosters we ended up with before they start crowing. Eeek!

Do you have chickens? Are they laying right now?

Mavis wants to know.

And if you are looking for a great chicken book, check out Homemade Living: Keeping Chickens with Ashley English I think it’s pretty awesome.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Cool Chicken Coop Designs and Chicken Stories of 2013

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

I’ve not only had a lot of fun in 2013 raising my crazy chickens, but I’ve loved seeing all your Mavis Mail chicken coop submissions. I have some of the most creative readers on the planet! Check out a recap of the very best chicken related posts of 2013:

My Chickens:

black australorp chickenHow to Maintain a Chicken Coop:

A reader asked so I answered. I talk all about how I maintain a large chicken coop. I give some tips and tricks and then answer even more coop questions in the comments of the post.

sick chickenRIP Matilda:

Sadly my daughter’s sweet chicken Matilda died in March because we discovered too late that she was egg bound. It was a tough loss because she was such a great pet chicken.  At least she got to die at home with us near her side.

blue cochin chick chicken 2 weeksRaising Backyard Chickens – Mean Girls Club:

Fluffy little Blueberry was the runt of our Blue Cochin babies and was almost bullied to death by the other new chicks. But she’s tougher than she looks and she survived!

puggle puppy blue cochin chickensUnlikely Friendships – Lucy and the Blue Cochin Chickens:

Blueberry, Bluebell and Blue Cheese came to live with us in March. Lucy immediately fell in love with them and treated them like her own babies!

Your Chickens:

DIY Chicken coop designs recycled wood pallets
Heather’s Chicken Coop Made from Recycled Wood Pallets

how to build a chicken tractorLaurie’s Chicken Coop Tractor and Garden Beds

DIY Chicken Coop PlansDIY Chicken Coop Made From an Old Play Set

chicken coop ideasLisa’s Chicken Coop Made From an Old Dog House

Looking for more info on chickens and pictures of coops? Check out my Chickens Board on Pinterest!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Little Boy with Autism Fights for His Right to Keep Chickens

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

chicken chickens

Thanks to One Hundred Dollars a Month reader, Karen, for sending me this article featured on the Huffington Post earlier this month.  The article describes the plight of one family to keep their backyard chickens, which they originally acquired when their autistic son’s pediatrician recommended they get a pet to help with social skills.

How to Collect, Clean and Store Chicken Eggs

The boy, J.J. didn’t respond to their family dog, so the family turned to chickens.  J.J. responded well to the chickens, and the family enjoyed teaching him about the animals, eggs, etc.  Then, the DeBary, Florida city council voted that they would not extend the backyard chicken permits, and J.J. and his family faced losing their pets.

The family fought to get the city council to reconsider the proposal, but the decision stood, and they were told they would need to get rid of their chickens by December 31st, 2013.  The family continued to fight–this time with a lawyer, media, and facebook.  I wanted to know how the whole debacle turned out, so I clicked over the family’s facebook page.  Turns out, they were granted a special permit allowing J.J. to keep his chickens.

Don’t you just love it when stories have happy endings?  How about you, do you have chickens?  Would you fight to be able to keep them, if your city decided not to allow them anymore?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Help! My Chicken Has a Sprained Ankle

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

mottled java

First of all, do chickens have ankles?

Friday night when The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird was locking the chickens up in the coop, she noticed Java the Hut’s leg was caught in one of the nesting grates inside our coop. Not only she flopped over on her side but her leg swollen and sticking straight out and she was unable to stand. Her head was a little bloodied and swollen from being pecked at as well. POOR JAVA!!

{Chickens will peck at another bird that is in it’s way or hurt {kind of like kicking someone when they are down}, yes it’s cruel, but that’s what they do.}

chicken head feathers pecked mottled java

So The Girl brought Java inside and cleaned her up the best she could with some warm water. Can you see her missing head feathers? :(

mottled java chicken pullet

We placed some pine shavings in a bin and added some food and water in case she was hungry and then kept her overnight in our bathroom with the light on {it’s the warmest spot in the house, plus it made the HH totally crazy}. These pictures were taken on Saturday afternoon after Java had perked up quite a bit.

broken chicken leg sprained ankle

When The Girl first found her, her right leg was about twice the size as it is in the above photo. She could not straighten her leg nor stand and we didn’t think she was going to make it.

But yesterday, the swelling went down but she is still unable to walk yet.

I don’t think her leg is broken, just swollen and sprained.

Do you have chickens? Has this ever happened? How long does it take for a chicken’s leg to heal?

And most importantly, the Handsome Husband wants to know when the chicken will be able to move out of our bathroom.

Anyone know?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Adding Chickens into Your Existing Flock

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

Adding Chickens into Your Existing Flock

Our baby chicks turned 8 weeks old recently and since the weather is starting to get a little cooler and the daylight hours shorter, we decided it was time to introduce the new chickens into our existing flock.

Adding New Chickens into Your Existing Flock

I’ve had people tell me introducing new chickens into your existing flock can be a difficult task, but in the four years that we’ve been raising chickens I’ve never really had any problems beyond the occasional chicken getting a little roughed up to establish the pecking order. And by roughed up I mean getting chased around the chicken yard or getting pecked a few times by an older bird.

In years past we have placed the younger chickens {anywhere from 8-12 weeks} in a fenced off area alongside the chicken run for a few days so the birds could get acquainted. But this time around, keeping the 8 week old chicks separated only last about an hour. We had decided to set the chicks outside in the late afternoon once the older birds had been fed and were pretty much worn out from walking around the chicken run all day.

Adding Chickens into Your Existing Flock

Well, before we knew it, Black Fatty had flown into the baby chicks fenced area and made herself at home.

You can tell by Mario’s expression he was thrilled. ;)

Adding New Chickens into Your Existing Flock

Once Black Fatty was in there for awhile, the chicks starting flying out of the fenced area one by one to explore their surroundings.

feeding chickens chicken scratch

And before we knew it, they were all walking around pretty peacefully together.

Yes, there was the occasional older bird chasing the younger bird, but that’s normal. I think as long as there isn’t any serious damage going on, the pecking order usually works itself out pretty quick.

omlet eglu cube chicken coop

When dusk came and all the older chickens were settled in the coop for the night, we picked up the baby chicks in groups of two and placed them in the warm nesting boxes inside the coop.

Once they were all in, Black Fatty nestled in right next to them and when we opened the doors the next morning, she was still there with them. :)

Now that’s what I call an easy transition.

Do you have chickens?

What has your experience with introducing new chickens into your existing flock been?

~Mavis


And if you are looking for a great chicken book, check out Homemade Living: Keeping Chickens with Ashley English I think it’s pretty awesome.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Raising Chickens – Is My Chicken a Rooster?

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

cuckoo maran chicken rooster

Okay, so we know Mario, our Cuckoo Maran chicken is totally a roo. He’s a chunky little monkey, has big feet and a bright red wattle and comb. And he’s feisty! ;)

Blue Laced Red Wyandottes

But now I am beginning to doubt my suspicions about one of our  Blue Laced Red Wyandottes. At first I thought the grey one was a roo, but now I’m not so sure.

Blue Laced Red Wyandottes

Yes the comb and wattle are larger and the feather colors are different, BUT the grey one is not at all feisty and has the same sized legs as Snow White {our other Blue Laced Red Wyandotte}. Maybe it’s just the thought of having to get rid of two roos that is making me question this chickens gender,  but I really, really don’t want to have to get rid of Prime Charming. He/she is such a sweet bird.

Araucana chicks

Luckily we know our Araucana chicks, Anne Hathaway and Chippy, are girls for sure. They are both so quite and love to be held. Did I mention they’re a little on the shy side too?

mottled java

Our Mottled Java’s are another story. One of them {Espresso} is a handful. She bolts every time I let her roam free. She’ll be going to Girly Girls house. ;) And Jabba the Hut, our other mottled java chick, has turned out to be a total love bug.

mottle java chick

As soon as she sees me or The Girl, she runs to the side of the chicken run and patiently waits to be picked up. She’s also quite fond of sitting on my shoulder.
buff orpington chick

And then last but not least, there is Buffy the Vampire Slayer, our Buff Orpington. Another total love bug. We will be keeping her too.

dogs and chickens puggle

Raising backyard chickens as pets {so you can steal their eggs} is cool, but when it comes time to give away to roos, it’s hard. Especially if they are nice ones. ;(

What do you think? Is our grey blue laced red wyandotte is a roo, or a hen?

~Mavis

how-to-care-for-baby-chicks1

If you are thinking about getting chicks next spring be sure and check out my How to Care for Baby Chicks tutorial for some helpful tips.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Recipes Garden Frugal Canning Chickens Travel