San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers – Butterfly Garden

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monarch butterfly on pine tree

Over the weekend I had the opportunity to go to the San Francisco San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers and check out their butterfly garden. It. Was.Amazing. It almost makes me want to move to the tropics and build my own butterfly house.

orange butterfly on flower

I don’t know the names of the butterflies we saw, but isn’t nature amazing?

butterfly house

Inside this little butterfly house were all sorts of chrysalis in various stages.

black butterfly on flower

The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I always think it’s amazing to see just one butterfly in our garden at a time, but hundreds? But to be able to walk through hundreds of butterflies at one time?

orange butterfly

I can see now why people actually collect dead butterflies and keep them behind glass. They are an absolute work of art.

black and yellow butterfly

The butterfly exhibit will be on display at the San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers through October 20th, 2013 if you want to stop by an take a look. If not, no worries, it’s highly likely your local science center or flower garden will have have a similar exhibit going on as well.

Butterflies are cool!

~Mavis

Insect Lore Live Butterfly Garden

If you’d like to hatch some butterflies of your own, Amazon sells the Insect Lore Live Butterfly Garden. My kids had this when they were young and LOVED it.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Greenhouse and Garden Pictures from Glazov, Russia

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marigolds in garden

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

old brick house

Check out these garden photos Anastasia sent in of her parents garden in Russia.

Here’s what’s she had to say:

“My family and I share the same passion for gardening. I have just started to develop my garden here, but my parents back in Russia have had theirs since I was a kid.

greenhouse cucumbers

They need to work almost twice as hard as people here in Washington since the summer is a lot shorter and the ground freezes over for about 8 months. But all of the hard labor pays off.

tomatoes growing in a greenhouse

They never buy any vegetables, rarely any fruit of berries. They live in Glazov, Russia.(Try finding it on a map!) I am enclosing some pictures of their garden and house that my parents built themselves.

greenhouse photos

I am really proud of their garden. Every time I visit my family in Russia I bring my two little kids with me. They dig in the ground next to my mom and I learn something new about growing my own fruit and vegetables.”

onions and strawberries

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Mail – Heather Sends in Her Backyard Garden Photos

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2liter bottles for gardening

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

Check out these garden photos Heather sent in. I love the hanging herbs she has hanging from the white lattice and the tomato plants in the 5 gallon buckets.

corn field

Here is what Heather had to say about her garden:

This is only our second year gardening at this house and our fourth year gardening ever, with one of those years at another house being very unsuccessful. We have a family of 6 with me, my husband, 2 boys (8 & 6) and 2 girls (5 & 3) and are fortunate to have a little less than an acre just outside of city limits where there are no restrictions on animals or gardens.

chickens and ducks

We currently have 25 young chickens and 4 white pekin ducks, plus our coop in progress. The chickens are staying in a temporary enclosure under the coop at night.

We had chickens years ago but had to sell them when we moved to a rental. Now we are starting over with the hopes of having eggs by the fall. We have a few more birds than we need because we have several friends and neighbors already lined up to buy from us. Our mini-farm, as we like to think of it, is a work in progress and is growing every year.

Next year we are planning to add a couple of small dairy goats, as well. I also have a greenhouse already planned out when we have the money to build it.

green beans

Our large garden has corn (4 weeks between plantings), tomatoes, okra, peppers, green beans, sugar snap peas that have died due to heat, squash, cucumbers, an open row or two for late veggies, more peppers, and potatoes that didn’t do as well.

large garden plot

The smaller garden has sunflowers, watermelon, cantaloupe, and honeydew.

borage

Raised bed with bricks has thriving strawberries, borage, and an elephant ear coming up in the middle.

squash

Also not pictured, we have a mini orchard with 3 apple trees, 2 plum trees, and a cherry tree; beds bordering the house with very young blueberries and raspberries; 2 grape vines; 2 cherry bushes along the driveway; a pecan tree in the backyard; a Meyer lemon tree; and herbs in various planters around the yard and house. All fruit trees and plants are young and were only put in this year and last.

Wow Heather! Everything looks great. I wish I could grow oddles of corn in my backyard. Your garden is awesome!

~Mavis

cinder block garden cute chicken coop design

Lindsey from Texas Sends in Cinder Block Garden Photos

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Mail – Lindsey from Texas Sends in Cinder Block Garden Photos

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cinder block garden cute chicken coop design

Wow! Check out this uber cute cinder block garden Lindsey from Texas sent in.

tomatoes growing in cinder blocks

This is Cindy’s second year using cinder blocks for her raised beds and she absolutely loves them.

Here is what she had to say about her garden:

Our cinder block raised beds hold potatoes, green beans, strawberries, tomatoes, cilantro, hot and sweet peppers, onions, carrots, lettuce, marigolds, ranunculus, sweet peas, sage and mint. We also have a plot of land dedicated to watermelons, cucumbers, cantaloupe, honeydew and corn, and a second plot that I’m about to plant our pumpkins in.

cinderblock garden

We have a three year old and a one year old that love to help out in the garden – they love looking for strawberries to eat while I’m out there weeding and watering. In addition to the all of the veggies that I’ve planted, we also have dewberry vines that grow wild on our land, so we now have our freezer full of berries – at least the ones the girls didn’t gobble down. We have also canned two batches of dewberry jelly and one batch of salsa this year already.

toddlers and chickens

Last September we got our mixed flock of six chickens – Nugget, Cuckoo, Weezy, Doodlebug, Pepper and Ginger.My husband, father, and father-in-law built an amazing coop for them which I still need to paint! Our plans are to eventually move our raised beds within the chicken run (fenced in from the chickens of course) so the chickens can keep a bug patrol around the perimeter of the vegetable garden.

backyard chickens

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

~Mavis

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Mail – Garden Photos from Fairfax, Virginia

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wood pallet garden pictures

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

~Mavis

wood pallets

Check out this story and the wood pallet garden photos from urban hipsters Dietrich and Carlie from Fairfax, VA.  The pictures you see start in March and then end with how their garden looks today.

Pretty cool if you ask me! 

how to build a wood pallet garden

Carlie writes:

Garden experience: None really. Both of our moms had very small backyard vegetable gardens growing up but neither of us paid much attention to the process. We are literal first timers and had no clue what we were doing.

landscape fabric

A little about us: We love eating and being healthy – I home-make much of our food and Dietrich is always running marathons. We moved to NOVA (since that’s where the jobs are in VA) after we graduated from Virginia Tech and got married. Northern Virginia is not known its gardens, but is very well known for being super expensive.

how to plant a wood pallet garden

Our life mission right now is to pay off our students loans – over $155,000 – in 5 years from when we graduated (we are on target so far!). So, living in the most expensive area in VA and trying to be as cheap as possible don’t quite mix usually. We started our blog Fat Soul Slim Kitchen in March to get information out there about how to live cheaply, healthily, and faithfully. Most of our friends are in a similar boat as us with lots of debt and low paying jobs, and we’ve been able to live fairly frugally, even in NOVA, so we wanted to get our life out there to show people how we did it – but also bring other’s ideas of how they are living life cheaply and healthily and faithfully so as to mutually encourage each other!

wood pallet edible garden

We currently live in someone’s basement and have our own back entrance and finally a “backyard”! Unfortunately, the “backyard” is a big slab of cement. So, we built our own little structure using free pallets we got from a nursery down the street and planted our garden in that. Since we share the “backyard” with our landlords, we couldn’t really take over too much, so right now we only have one little 3 X 4 foot bed. It’s producing like crazy though and we can’t believe it. We have eaten spinach that grew in our backyard! Mind blown.

wood pallet garden

Our plants are: Zucchini (taking over), tomato, carrots (harvested most), onion, asparagus, spinach (done harvesting), honey dew, watermelon, cucumber, broccoli (just popping out!), squash, strawberries (flowered but no berries), red peppers, and green peppers.

Blessings,
Carlie

backyard-garden-photos

Bob and Sherle From California Share Their Vegetable Garden Photos

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

JBLM Community Gardens and Planting Peas with Preschoolers

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children's garden tacoma

Yesterday was Ryan’s last day here in the lovely Pacific Northwest so we headed out early and checked out a few more local gardens.

We ended up making a bean teepee and planting pumpkin seeds with some local preschoolers in their children’s garden. Oh my word I had forgotten how funny little kids can be.

ryan botanical interests

Ryan did a great job talking to the group of 30 kids and when he asked what the children’s favorite vegetables to eat were they surprised us with their answers. Cabbage, broccoli, beans, carrots {of course} and bean sprouts.

How many 4 year old kids do you know that eat bean sprouts? I thought it was awesome.

JBFL Community Garden Mavis butterfield Ryan

Then after planting beans and pumpkins with preschoolers,  Ryan and I took a trip out to the Joint Base Lewis McCord Community Gardens to donate some seeds and to plant a few raised beds for the troops. Karinna from Coupon Connoisseurs of JBLM invited us to stop by and take a tour so we did.

JBLM Community Garden  mavis ryan miriam holly

The garden has been there since the 1970′s but Miriam {with the baby strapped to her} has been in charge of the gardens for the past few years. The garden beds run $25 a year for an existing bed or $15 for the first year is you just rent a patch of dirt and build your own.

Ryan and I each planted a bed {I planted beans, beets, onions and squash} and Karinna is going to keep them watered and donate the vegetables for us. Pretty cool if you ask me.

JBLM community gardens mavis

Gardeners Holly and Jessica selecting seeds.

bee hive boxes

One of the soldiers over there even has bees! How cool is that? It was a great day and I had a blast showing Ryan around town and checking out the various gardens.

Gardens are cool no matter what size they are, big, small, or in containers. As long as you are having fun and enjoying what you are growing, that’s what it’s all about.

Peace Out Girl Scouts, have a great day. I’m off to go dig in my own dirt.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Japanese Tea Garden – Seattle

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Japanese Tea Garden - Seattle pictures

My buddies Amberlina and Lola are in town this weekend and one of the things on our to do list was to check out the Japanese Tea Garden in Seattle. Have you been?

Japanese Tea Garden  Seattle

If you live in the Seattle area, you really need to stop over at the Japanese Gardens.  It was one of the most serene, beautiful places I’ve ever visited.  It was designed by a Japanese garden designer, Juki Iida in 1960–which means it has had 53 years to mature.  And seriously, it is exactly what you would imagine a Japanese garden to be like.

Japanese maple tree

Apparently this year, they are piloting a new program where you can schedule weddings.  But don’t get your hopes up because you have to go through an application process and they are only accepting a handful of couples. I totally would want to get married here.  You wouldn’t have to do anything but buy a dress–the flowers and ambiance are already provided.

The park is only 3 1/2 acres, but it packs a lot in.  There are walking paths that twist through immaculately landscaped gardens.

Japanese Tea Garden - Seattle

I think my favorite spot was the little bridge over the pond though. I’m not sure what the tall tiny purple flowers were, but I need a few for my wooded backyard. Oh and the moss. It was amazing. How weird is that? Who on earth gets excited about moss?

If you get the chance, Go! You’ll love it.

~Mavis

Seattle Japanese Tea Garden
1075 Lake Washington Blvd E
Seattle WA 98112

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

The Johnson Farm on Anderson Island

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anderson island

Today Ryan and I took a ferry to The Johnson Farm on Anderson Island.  My neighbor Mrs. Hillbilly and I went to the farm last weekend and had so much fun that I had to take Ryan back and show him around. Sue Huseby {who is totally awesome!} is the current community garden coordinator and she gave us a private tour of the gardens.

anderson island community garden

The whole farm is awesome.  While it is no longer a functioning as farm, it is  a community garden, which is split up into 30 individual gardening plots that are leased out for $40 a year. Back in the day it was primarily a chicken farm–with eggs being it’s primary source of revenue.  It’s seriously an amazing insight into more simple chicken farming practices used in the past.  Man-oh-man, sometimes I think I was born in the wrong time.

old brooder house

The Brooder House is where the baby chicks were incubated and then cared for until they were ready to be placed into the larger coops.  The heated incubators were along the sides of the walls, and once the chicks hatched, they were moved to the floor under the brooder.  The center of the floor had a heater to keep the chicks warm.

egg room old barn

The Egg Room was considered the heart of the farm.  It was where the eggs were cleaned, sorted and packaged {all by hand, until 1964, when they bought an egg washing machine}.

old barn building

The Barn was built in 1917.  It was called a pole barn, because it is made of poles rather than traditional lumber.  It housed 12-15 cows, which were mostly used for milking and breeding.  For awhile, there was a barn owl who took up residence in the barn, which is worth mentioning because he actually provided the farm with income.  They sold the owl’s regurgitated pellets to the schools for their science labs.  I guess it’s true, in farming, EVERYBODY has to pull their load.

anderson island homestead

The Tower is kind of the icon of the Johnson Farm.  It was used as the milk room.  A pump from the nearby pond filled an old wooden tank in the tower, providing water.  Inside, there was a huge concrete vault that kept the milk cool once it had been bottled. It sits just behind the old Johnson home which is currently set up as a museum and looks very much like it did back in the day.

apple orchard

The farm also has an orchard, which still produces apples for juice and apple cider.  It is a later addition to the farm, planted in 1993.  Each October, there is an annual apple squeeze.

nature path

There is also a nature trail that crosses the southern part of the farm.  It passes by ponds, marshy lands, and forested areas–pretty much giving you an overview of the geography of the whole island.

If you every get the chance to go to Anderson Island, be sure and stop by the Johnson Farm.

Thanks Sue and Bill for the tour!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis and Ryan Visit St. John Bosco’s Church and The Family Renewal Shelter

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mavis butterfield ryan botanical interests

Over the next few days you’ll be seeing a lot of photo’s of Ryan and I traveling around town visiting local gardens to give away boatloads of Botanical Interest Seeds to charity’s and organizations we think are pretty cool.

square foot gardening

Ryan arrived in Seattle around 10 am this morning for the Mother Earth News Fair this coming weekend and by noon we were on the road.

rhubarb plants white picket fence

Our first stop was St. John Bosco’s Church in Lakewood, Washington. I had learned about St. John Bosco’s last fall when reader Michelle told me about their food bank garden.

square foot gardening

The church garden started 16 years ago and in the beginning only grew flowers for church services. A few years later, seeing the need in their community they decided to turn it in to vegetable garden.

square foot gardening grid

Last year they harvested {and donated} over 5,600 pounds of vegetables to their local food bank.

square foot gardening photos

The St. John Bosco’s Church garden is maintained by it’s members who come together one day a week for about 3 hours starting around mid February. Rain or shine they are out there every week working in their 20+ square foot garden beds.

john Bosco's Food Bank Garden Lakewood

Today we were able to donate over 500 seed packets to the St. John Bosco’s garden crew so they can continue on their mission of feeding their community. How cool is that?

family renewal shelter tacoma

We also stopped by the Family Renewal Center in Tacoma, Washington. The Family Renewal Center is a wonderful organization dedicated to bringing healing, hope and new life to victims of domestic violence. Not only does the Family Renewal Center provide transitional housing for victims for up to 18 months, they also have an incredible garden where the residents grow organic fruits and vegetables for their families.

Giving back is cool, now matter how you do it.

THANK YOU to the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company for donating all these seeds!

~Mavis

botanical interests

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Mail – Vasi From Romania Sends in Her Garden Photos

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start seeds in egg shellsHow to Start Seeds in Eggshells

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

Check out these beautiful pictures reader Vasi sent in from Romania!!!

sqaure foot garden

Vasi is an amateur gardener but has become addicted to growing. She likes to start her crops from the seed and she advocates everyday for organic gardening through her blog Vasi-Gioni.

Here is what Vasi had to say:

garden plants

This year I have grown 15 varieties of tomatoes, 5 varieties of capsicum and, in addition to the last years, Kiwano, american cucumbers, pak choi, red giant mustard and white  cucumbers.

dandilions

I discovered your blog last year and I learned a lot of things from you, everyday I take an impulse for organizing my garden as good as possible.

man holding pepper plants

The photos represent the beginning of the 2013 gardening season.

cucumber seedlings

~Mavis

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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