Seattle Tilth Spring Plant Sale and Educational Classes

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unnamedI’m such a big supporter of the Seattle Tilth because their mission is simple and one I can totally get behind: to inspire and educate people to safeguard our natural resources while building an equitable and sustainable local food system. I’ve been to their plant sales, their chicken coop tour and their educational classes and I’ve been blown away by every event.

They have some great things up their sleeves this year. Here are just a few things I’m excited about:

March Edible Plant Sale

Stock-up on organic and locally grown edible plant starts perfect for spring planting, and find a huge selection of edible flowers, fruit shrubs, fruit trees, seeds, supplies and knowledge galore at their March Edible Plant Sale. It’s on Saturday, March 15th, 2014 from 9am-3pm. at the Pacific Market Center garage. Admission is FREE!

Their Classes

Make 2014 your best gardening year ever, by getting educated! Whether you plan on starting your own seeds indoors, adding chickens, bees and other livestock to your urban {or suburban} farm or supercharging your soil with homemade compost, they’ve got a class for you.

Check out their new offerings like Intro to Permaculture and Grow Fruit in Small Spaces classes, or choose from these other awesome options:

Urban Livestock Classes
Backyard Beekeeping 101 Thu., Jan. 23; 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Backyard Beekeeping 101 Sat., Feb. 1; 10 a.m.-noon (Wallingford)
Backyard Beekeeping 101 Thu., Feb. 13; 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Beekeeping 201: Start Your Hive Sat., Feb. 22; 10 a.m.-noon (Wallingford)
City Chickens 101 Sat., Jan. 11; 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
City Chickens 101 Sat., Feb. 8; 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Raise Baby Chicks Sat., Jan. 25; 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Raise Baby Chicks Sat., Feb. 22; 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Wallingford)

Veggie Gardening
Start Seeds Indoors Sat., Feb. 1; 2-4 p.m. (Mt. Baker)
Start Seeds Indoors Wed., Feb. 19; 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Smart Garden Planning Sat., Feb. 8; 10 a.m.-noon (Mt. Baker)
Smart Garden Planning Wed., Feb. 26; 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Wallingford)
Organic Gardening 101 Sat., Feb. 15; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (Wallingford)

Permaculture & Sustainable Landscapes
Prune Fruit Trees Sat., Feb 8; 1-5 p.m. (Wallingford)
Intro to Permaculture Sat., Feb. 8; 2-5 p.m. (Mt. Baker)
Composting 101 Sat., Feb. 22; 2-4 p.m. (Wallingford)
Grow Fruit in Small Spaces Thu., Feb. 27; 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Wallingford)

View their calendar of classes or see the full list.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Friday Night at the Movies – Euphoria

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Tonight The Girl and I are going to watch Euphoria.  It’s a documentary that popped up on my suggestions list on Amazon Prime.  It’s about our pursuit of happiness–and whether or not it’s working, or even possible.  It’s kind of an interesting premise, so I thought it wouldn’t hurt to check it out.  Plus, it’s FREE on Prime, so I am really not out anything.

euphoria

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Fresh Dirt

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greenhouse garden winter

I don’t know what it is about filling garden containers with fresh dirt that makes my heart sing, but it does. Maybe it’s knowing spring is right around the corner and pretty soon my backyard garden will be up and running at full speed again.

glass greenhouse garden

Some days I walk around the garden and shake my head at all that needs to be done.
dirt in pots greenhouse

Other days I just walk outside not knowing what the heck I’m going to do then somehow get a ton of garden chores done. I know I should make a list, but it seem less daunting {and more fun} to just head outside with Lucy the Puggle Dog in tow and pick up a shovel and start looking around for something to do.

lasagna garden

Yesterday I spent a couple hours in the garden digging up 2 old garden beds and moving the dirt to the new lasagna gardenraised garden beds kale

Originally I was planning on replacing all 16 of my garden beds this winter, but after a lot of thought the HH and I decided instead of expanding we would reduce the size of our garden instead.

Yep, over the next few weeks we will remove 6 of our raised garden beds. This will give us a total of 10 4×8 raised garden beds, 1 lasagna garden, 1 greenhouse garden and a few containers to work with this year.
painted steel drumsIt will be our smallest garden we’ve had to work with since moving here 8 years ago but with everything going on this year I think it’s time to pull back a little.

Now, what do you think I should do with these steel drums?

I was kind of thinking they’d make a cool fire pit. What do you think?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Monthly Garden Chores for January – East Coast Edition

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This is a guest post written by my buddy Heather from Massachusetts.  I thought it would be fun this year to post Monthly Garden Chores from both the West Coast and East Coast. You can see my January garden plans for my Seattle, Washington garden HERE.

january garden choresHi everyone,

Our friend Mavis and I have often wished we were neighbors. We both have teenagers {and their busy sports schedules}, chickens, gardens in suburbia backyards, and we love DIY projects! The main difference is we live on opposite coasts and that means drastically different garden zones and garden season rhythms, plus it makes popping over for some tea, coffee and muffins a bit more difficult.

So she asked me to put together a garden update from the east coast. Here is southeast Massachusetts I’m in zone 5b, which means, for now, we have to be a little more patient for spring. But come spring and summer, absolutely everything blooms. The flowers, the bushes and the trees – the memory of spring in New England keeps me here all.year.long!

seed packetsSeeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month:

In years past I’ve started seeds in a windowsill only to have them grow spindly and pathetic in the weak New England pre-spring sunshine. I would usually struggle along with seedlings until Mother’s Day and then hit a local greenhouse like the sunshine-starved, cabin-fevered, pasty looking new englanders we are.

The last frost date is around the third week in May, but gardeners don’t dare plant until May 20th. This year Santa brought me grow lights and I am BEYOND excited, I’ve been stalking the UPS tracking website, *hopping up and down*, it should be here any day!!

ammending soild with horse manureWhat I Plan to Transplant Outside this Month:

Does snow count? Earlier in the fall I enriched my soil with horse manure, leaves and chicken poo. So for now, I gaze upon my snowy heaps and dream of the lush soil I’ll have come May! And of course, begin sketching out my garden plan.

eggs in handWhat I plan to Harvest This Month:

Eggs. My four girls are still pumpin’ out 2-3 eggs a day. We have four cold-hardy, good laying hens that we got last April. Two are Rhode Island Reds (Agnus and RoadRunner) and two are Black Sexlinks (Mr. Bubblesworth and Goldfinger). In the summer four eggs a day is enough for a dozen eggs for us and we sell the other dozen to a family in town.

potted meyer lemon treeTrees and Shrubs:

Our Meyer Lemon was brought inside in the fall and promptly produced 9 lemons! For some reason one little green lemon has gone into hybernation mode – it may or may not have something to do with the 68* house temp ;) . I’ll be ordering citrus fertilizer this month to help it prepare for spring.

Weed and Pest Control:

Last year we had a substantial problem with CHIPMUNKS. And not the cute adorable kind. The vengeful, tomato scarfing kind. One of the good things about a long cold winter is that is arrests the insects and gives us gardeners time to study up on a solution!

snow in bostonLawn Care:

The HH is really great about snow blowing paths all over the yard for me. One to the chicken coop :) , one to the shed, and one whole track around the house so our two greyhounds can get a lap or two in on those cold, snowy days.

**These garden chores are based on my Zone 5b Southeast/Boston MA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Patagonia’s Worn Wear Campaign

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A big thanks to One Hundred Dollars a Month reader Jen who let me know about Patagonia’s Worn Wear Campaign. When I was a teenager, I owned a purple Patagonia zip up jacket and let me tell you Bob, it was the coolest jacket ever. And I kept it for about 10 years before donating it to a local thrift shop so someone else could enjoy it.

After seeing this video though, I wish I would have kept it. {I think my favorite story is the guy with the board shorts}.

How about you? Do you have a favorite article of clothing that you just can’t seem to part with?

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Grow Your Own Sprouts – The Health Benefits

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how to grow your own sprouts (2)
I’ve told you all about how to grow sprouts and the awesome Botanical Interest Seed Sprouter I use to do just that, but let’s talk about why you should be eating those sprouts! There are SO MANY health benefits from sprouts and with all our healthy eating New Year’s resolutions, it’s the perfect time to start sprouting. Here are just a few of the health benefits of sprouting:

1. The vitamin and mineral content is out of this world. If your body is lacking calcium, potassium, iron, Vitamin A, B, B Complex, E, or K, get to sprouting already. It is estimated that the vitamin content increases by up to 20 times the original value within only a few days of sprouting and that there can be up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than normal raw fruits and veggies. Getting more vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and essential fatty acids from the foods you eat will, simply put, make you a healthier person.

2. The sprouting process also makes these minerals more usable in your body when the mineral binds to the protein in the bean seed or nut.

3. Sprouting increases the fiber content in the food you sprout. If you’re looking for a great addition to your weight loss routine, increasing your fiber is where it’s at.

4. Sprouting also increases the quality of protein in the beans, nuts or seeds you sprout. Proteins change during the soaking and sprouting process, increasing the nutritional value of your food. Who needs protein powder when you have sprouts?

5. Sprouts help reduce the acidity levels in your body. Too much acidity can be detrimental to your health and in some cases, even increase your risk of cancer. Sprouts help alkalize your body to prevent this.

6. I’m always looking for ways to get more of the essential fatty acids into my diet. Well guess what? The sprouting process increases the essential fats. Problem solved with just a few sprouts.

7. You control what you sprout. There’s no danger in consuming harmful chemicals, pesticides or additives because you’re doing all the growing! As a gardener, this is probably my favorite health benefit of sprouting.234

And there you have some of the many health benefits of sprouting. I sprout all sorts of things and love incorporating my sprouts into recipes or throwing them on a sandwich. Not only are they delicious, but sprouts are so stinkin easy to grow. Even if you kill every plant you try to grow, I promise you can grow sprouts!seed sprouter botanical interests If you haven’t ever sprouted anything or are nervous about trying it, I highly recommend trying the Botanical Interest Seed Sprouter. It’s perfect for beginners and completely awesome for advanced sprouters too who want to stack a ton of trays on top of each other and grow, grow, grow.

020While you’re waiting for your new sprouter to arrive, you can always sprout in a simple Mason jar. That’s how I learned how to sprout and it works like a charm.

So tell me, why do you sprout? What’s your favorite thing to sprout? How do you use your sprouts?

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Giveaway: {2} $100 Gift Certificates to Fast Growing Trees

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fast growing trees

Just when you thought we were all giveawayed out after those crazy 24 Days of Christmas Giveaways, I’m ringing in the new year with one of my favorite giveaways EVER! I’m so excited about it I’m having trouble typing. Yep, it’s that awesome!

How to Plant a Meyer Lemon Tree Container

It’s no secret how much I love Lemon, my Meyer Lemon Tree I ordered from Fast Growing Trees. Lemon has been everything I hoped for in a tree and more. It was love at first sight because I didn’t have to haul her from the store, get the back of our truck filthy or worry about her tipping over on the way home. Nope, all I had to do was plop down at my computer, find the tree I wanted on Fast Growing Trees and with a few simple clicks, my tree was on my doorstep within days.  The experience was so awesome, in fact,  I was kicking myself that I’d wasted years getting trees the hard way!

meyer lemon tree in box fast growing trees

In addition to how simple it was to order the tree, and how speedy fast the shipping was, the tree was packed so well it arrived in perfect shape and ready to be planted. The root ball was in perfect shape too and there were already tons of lemon buds, which was a total bonus I wasn’t expecting!

Plus, their customer service was awesome, too! Right after they shipped my tree, Pam over at Fast Growing Trees sent me an email with planting instructions so I’d know just how to plant Lemon.

meyer lemon tree buds

And guess what? Now you can have a Lemon of your very own! The awesome peeps at Fast Growing Trees are generously giving away not one, but TWO $100 gift certificates to Fast Growing Trees to TWO of my lucky readers!! Wahooo!

So how do you get in to win? Just head on over to Fast Growing Trees and tell me what you’d spend your $100 gift certificate on if you won.
A cherry tree? A Royal Empress? Or perhaps some Lavender Rhododendron?

Just answer that one question and you’re entered to win. Life’s pretty complicated sometimes, so I like to keep things simple around here.

Rules

1 entry per person/ip address. If you cheat, you will totally be disqualified.

This giveaway ends Sunday, January 12th at 6pm. Winners will be announced in the January 13th edition of Mornings with Mavis. You will be notified via email and have 24 hours to claim your prize. If you do not claim your prize within 24 hours, the prize will be forfeited.

Good Luck! I hope you win!

Mavis

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This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Free Garden Seed Catalogs

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Photo Credit

Now that the holidays are over, it’s time to start thinking about ordering seeds for this years garden. Here is a giant list of seed companies for you to choose from:

Botanical Interests Seed Catalog {These are my favorite!  Plus, my boyfriend Ryan works here}

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds {Cool rare seeds}

Totally Tomatoes Seed Catalog {Big selection of tomatoes, obviously, but sells other seeds too}

Burpee Seed Catalog {One of the larger seed companies.  Website says they are committed to selling only non-GMO seeds, though}

Seeds of Change Catalog {100% certified organic seeds}

Seed Savers Seed Catalog {Non profit organization dedicated to saving and sharing heirloom seeds}

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange {Sells varieties specifically suited to grow in the Southern part of the U.S.}

Sustainable Seed Company {Certified organic heirloom seeds}

Territorial Seeds Catlaog {Untreated seeds.  Family-owned business out of Oregon}

Peaceful Valley Seed Catalog {Promotes organic gardening}

Uprising Seeds {Open pollinated, organic certified seeds}

Victory Seed Company {Rare, open-pollinated, and heirloom seeds}

Johhny’s Seed Catalog {Employee-owned company out of Maine.  Committed to the safe seed pledge}

High Mowing Seed Catalog {100% organic seed, based out of Vermont}

Gardens Alive {a great source for bugs and organic fertilizers}

D. Landreth Seed Company {oldest seed house in America–catalog is not free, but it is available online}

Amishland Heirloom Seeds {Owned and operated by one woman.  She ONLY sells her OWN  seeds, and has signed the safe seed pledge}

Cherrygal Heirloom Seeds {Eclectic company selling non-GMO seeds and hand-crafted items}

Bountiful Gardens {Seed company out of California selling untreated open-pollinated non-GMO seed}

Pinetree Garden Seeds {Family-owned company promising to never sell GMO seeds or support anything that in any way supports Monsanto}

FedCo Seeds {Adapted to be cold-hardy, specifically for the Northeast United States}

Stokes Seeds {Carries a selection of treated and untreated seeds}

Gurney’s Seeds {Seed variety galore}

The Cook’s Garden {Seeds for gourmet gardeners}

Irish Eye’s Garden Seeds {Quality provider of potato, vegetable, flower and garden seeds}

Hudson Valley Seed Library {Great seeds, even greater packaging art work}

Seeds Now {They sell only 100% natural NON-Hybridized and 100% NON-Genetically Modified seeds}

Seattle Seed Company {They encourage people to buy locally and to grow their own food when possible!}

Did I miss one of your favorite seed companies?  Let me know in the comment selection below and I’ll add it to the list.

~ Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Monthly Garden Chores – January

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Monthly Garden Chores – January

So the holidays are over and now it is time to start thinking about your early spring garden.  I’m always wiped out on gardening by late fall, but by January, I am itching to get my hands in the dirt again.

Depending on your region, you may want to just stick to planning your garden for now.  Sketch out your layout, so you know exactly where you’ll be planting everything, plus, you will have lots of time to consider companion planting options to get the most out of your garden.  I’m lucky, here in the Northwest, I can start a few things already.

grow lights

Seeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month

I strongly recommend a grow light if you are starting indoors now, otherwise, the gray days may not be enough to get your seeds germinated.

  • Yellow Granex Onions {store really well}
  • Artichokes {Green Globe and Purple of Romagna}
  • Lettuce {Valentine Mix}
  • Lavender {smells awesome and brings in the bees}
  • Rosemary {repels deer, so it’s awesome for border landscapes}
  • Leeks {kind of like onions, only sweeter}
  • Kale {maybe just a few plants for the chickens}

See the full list of seeds I’ll be planting this year.

magnum glass greenhouse winter snow

What I Plan to Transplant Outside this Month

Nothing goes outside this month.  The weather outside is frightful, but inside it’s so delightful–at least with a grow light it is. Ha! ;)

How to Plant a Meyer Lemon Tree Container

Plants and/or Bulbs I Plan to Purchase this Month

Last year, I bought a Meyer Lemon tree from Fast Growing Trees in January.  I kept it inside at first, because it isn’t wild about temperatures below 40 degrees. Eventually, I moved it out to the greenhouse. If you plan on buying a lemon tree, be sure and check out my tutorial on How to Plant a Meyer Lemon Tree.

mung bean sprouts

What I plan to Harvest This Month

January is also a good time to really check all of your stored produce.  If you stored potatoes, apples etc. go through them and make sure you don’t have any…well, bad apples.

How-To-Create-a-Terrarium

Houseplants and Indoor Bulbs

Houseplants can become susceptible to spider mites around this time of year.  You can deter them by spritzing the leaves with water.  Also, in these darker months, make sure to cut down on the watering.  If you want to force some bulbs to bloom for a little indoor color in early spring plant tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, etc. in pots indoors now.

If you have never planted a succulent terrarium before, checkout my How to Make a Succulent Terrarium tutorial. It’s a great rainy day activity.

mavis butterfield

Trees and Shrubs

If you aren’t snowed in, now is the time to clean up the yard a bit.  Last year, I burned all the stumps in my yard and created a few new beds.  It’s kind of dependent on how soggy the weather is, though.  Don’t prune anything quite yet though.  It is still too cold.

Weed and Pest Control

There’s nothing to do here.  Sit back and enjoy it–because in a couple of months, it will be a never-ending battle.

Lawn Care

Again, nothing to do here in January, just sit back and let the rain do its job.

**These garden chores are based on my Zone 8a Seattle/Tacoma WA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Take Time to Breathe and Grow What You Love This Year

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pulling weeds

When you are out working in the garden do you ever feel like you are doing stuff no one will ever notice? Like pulling weeds for example. We have this 20 foot long section of prickly, evil blackberry bushes that creeps up into our yard about every 2 years or so and it looks just awful.

wheelbarrow weeds

Or at least it did, until yesterday.

blackberry bushes

Yes we cleaned it up, but so what. The wee patch of land is still insignificant and anything but magical. I don’t know about you, but I despise spending my time on projects like that.

wooden garden box

Rearranging my garden however is a totally different story. Now that, brings me joy. Even if it’s just as much work {or more} than removing blackberry bushes.

garden boxes

I spent so much time trying to expand my garden last summer that by the end of the season I was so tired of gardening and I ended up taking  full two months off from gardening.

green rake

Yes, I love to garden, but with so much on my plate this year I need to prioritize. Slow down. Enjoy the process. Because really, what’s the point of gardening if it stresses me out. Right?

mavis butterfield garden blog

So this year instead of making myself crazy all over again with a boatload of crazy ideas and projects, I’ve decided to rein my garden in a bit instead.

red wheelbarow

This year I am going to concentrate on growing the foods that my family loves {good riddance kale!}.

raised garden beds

Grow what you love  is my motto for this year.

How about you? What are your garden plans for 2014

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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