Monthly Garden Chores for May – East Coast Edition

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This is a guest post written by my buddy Heather from Massachusetts. I thought it would be fun this year to post Monthly Garden Chores from both the West Coast and East Coast. You can see my May garden plans for my Seattle, Washington garden HERE.

Monthly Garden Chores for May – East Coast Edition

May – whooooo-hoo! May is where it’s at! Not only did I get to put all my cold-loving plants out, direct sow a ton, but the garden has began to wake up and it’s rained a LOT, so everything is doing well!

organic-gardening-cucumber-seedlings

Seeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month

  • Chamomile
  • More Tomatoes
  • Delphinium
  • Echinacea
  • Cucumbers
  • Pumpkins {which in hindsight was way too early}

pea sprouts

What I Plan to Transplant Outside this Month

  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Romaine Lettuce
  • Celery
  • Tomatoes started from seed in January, cozily under the Hoop House 
  • Brussels Sprouts {direct sow}
  • Kale {direct sow}
  • Swiss Chard {direct sow}
  • Broccoli {direct sow}
  • Peas {direct sow}
  • Carrots {direct sow}

marigolds

Plants and/or Bulbs I Plan to Purchase this Month

Marigolds, no one can ever have enough marigolds. I plan to thwart the chipmunks by planting marigolds in every box – they hate marigolds. I might even get vindictive and plant them in and around the rock wall buh-wha-hahaa!

raspberry leaves

Trees and Shrubs

I am very excited/relieved to report that the blueberries bushes I snagged last fall in a sweet end-of-the-season sale are loooooving their new homes under some large pines. I didn’t trim them this year as I didn’t know how well they had settled in and I didn’t want to stress them. Turns out they’re doing great and are covered in new green growth and flower buds. Hmmmmm blueberries!

At that same sale, I picked up three raspberry bushes that were labeled a “container” variety, which I figured would be perfect for the raised bed I planned to put them in. I just saw new growth today, so alls well in the raspberry container. Hmmmmm raspberries!

Add hair to your garden to keep deer out of your yard.

Weed and Pest Control

Hair Around the Garden: Free

After being the “weird chicken-lady” in the neighborhood, plus worms in my basement, plus the elaborate garden and canning… it’s all just very not-very-suburbanite. I figured, what the heck – might as well be that weird lady that picked up hair from the local hair place.

I used to host a huge Hair Cutting Party for my son’s LaCrosse team right before the season ending jamboree {a tournament} to give them all mohawks they would spray their team colors for the jamboree. Alas, they have out grown this tradition I had to find a new source of hair to sprinkle around my garden, which keeps bunnies and deer away (they don’t like human smell). To get the hair I needed, you guessed it, I called the local hair place in the morning and after awkwardly explaining why I needed the hair and if they would save it form me. It turns out, I’m the THIRD person to call and ask.

One lady used it for her garden and the other lady crammed her rock wall with hair because the chipmunks don’t like it either. Yes, I can hear what you’re all thinking, and you’re right it is disgusting. Desperate times… and chipmunks, call for hair bombs. *gag*

Another trick I’ve used for years is hanging a bar of soap in an onion bag near the garden. Get a stinky brand like Irish Spring, deer don’t like the smell of soap.

Lawn Care

Let the fussing over the yard begin! Luckily this is not my arena. I have the HH to fertilize and seed and I have a teenager to mow. Yesssss.

chicken tractor

Chickens

The babies are now in their awkward teenager phase. For the last two or three weeks I’ve put them in the chicken tractor next to the outside pen so the big girls could see/hear/smell the babies but can not get at them.

Yesterday I cleaned out the pen, did a little rearranging and generally cleaned up so I could start the next phases of putting the babies and the big girls together. Today I was able to put the babies in the chicken tractor inside the outdoor pen – the big girls were not psyched about this new development but they’ll get used to them or the next couple of weeks.

fresh eggs

Houston we have a Broody Hen. I don’t spend a lot of time watching the chickens, and honestly the two black ones look the same and the two red ones look the same. Also, I couldn’t really tell if the same black hen who was always in the same nesting box, or if it was the other black hen, or, maybe I just kept catching them at egg laying time. Either way, I just wasn’t sure until I saw her tail all drooped down in the nesting box. So when I put the babies away for the night I put Ms. Broody in the tractor with some food and water. She was a bit put out but happily ate and drank.

“Mom, why does my chicken have a waddle already?” Hmmm, that’s right I’m pretty sure we have a roo. My plan to have an even number of chicken breeds is now shattered and I’m rattled. First, we can’t keep the roo. Second, now I’ll have two Black Sex-Links, two Rhode Island Reds and one Barred Rock. Hmph

hoop houses

Big Projects

The rubber mulch is still the unsightly blemish on my back yard. But it’s JUST SO MUCH. And like regular mulch you shovel and shovel and shovel, it’s just never-ending! So, the pile is a work in process. I know have about 25 bags filled {up from 14 last month}, unfortunately it seems that I still have half of a giant pile.

periwinkle

A couple of months ago the HH was watching hockey and I was on the couch simultaneously reading the three garden books laying around me and perusing Pinterest at the same time when I blurted “I’m gonna dig up those pokey bushes in the front that I hate and plant flowers for the bees ok?” His response? “Sure wifey.” Saaaweeet.

So I contacted my high-energy friend Hana who I’ve unloaded , er uuuuh bartered with before. Sure enough she wanted them all {thank goodness}. Not only did I not have to dig them up {Hana made quick work of the job} but she brought me periwinkle for the densely shaded side yard and some wicked cool curvy vines that I’ll use in the pen for new perches for the birds. Bartering is the deal. ;)

~Heather

**These garden chores are based on my Zone 5b Southeast/Boston MA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Friday Night at the Movies – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

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A couple of weeks ago, The Girl and I watched State Fair.  It was just as fun as I remember.  One of my readers mentioned Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, and I had totally forgotten about that one.  I probably haven’t seen it in 15 years.  So, tonight, I am introducing The Girl to get another classic.  Thanks Renay for reminding me about this one!

seven brides for seven brothers

Have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend, ~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies? Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Easy Worm Compost Bin Tutorial

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Easy Worm Compost Bin Tutorial

Vermicomposting? Worm Castings? Worm Farm? Yikes. Could I do it? Would it smell? Would the worms *gasp* escape? Would the HH not throw a fit about my worm bin in the basement?

Vermicomposting is the fancy name for feeding a bunch of red wiggler worms for the sole purpose of having them do what they normally do. Eat, sleep, make babies, and create castings {the fancy word for worm poop}. Worm castings are the stuff of garden soil legends.

You will NOT believe how easy vermicomposting is! If you manage kids, dogs, and/or chickens then managing a worm bin is a breeze.

worms

Do I have to touch the worms? ;)
Nope. They come in a bag and I could’ve just dumped them in but my two kids are known for collecting worms on a rainy day for my garden, so they played with them a bit as they spread them around the bin.

Does it smell?
No, it actually has the earthy-spring-soil smell. The key is to keep the scraps you’re feeding them under the other paper material in the bin {dampened shredded paper a handful of soil}. This will also keep fruit flies from developing.

Will the worms escape?
No – if you have created a wormy ecosystem they will stay put.

supplies needed to make a worm bin

Worm Bin Supplies

  • Dampened shredded paper {Soak the paper then squeeze it out well}
  • A handful of soil { worms use the dirt like chickens use grit – it helps them digest their food}
  • Kitchen Scraps {no meat, no dairy, no grease – just like a compost pile}
  • Worms – Red Wigglers love this environment best and are very fast producers
  • One dark bin with a lid {Rubbermaid containers work great for this}
  • One slightly larger bin of any color to use as a drip tray {no lid needed}
  • Drill
  • 1/16” drill bit
  • 1/8” drill bit

uncle jims worm farm

How to make a Worm Bin

There are a million different types of worm bins in just as many sizes, shapes and materials used. Deciding your needs will help you narrow down your choices.

how to make a worm bin

I knew that I wanted to keep my worm bin in the basement because our New England weather is pretty severe on both ends {up to 95* in the summer and down to the single digits in the winter} and I didn’t want to fuss with those details. I knew I’d use a plastic or rubber container because, well, it’s just so easy to pop into Target and pick one up. And finally, I knew I would start out small and who knows maybe I’d become a worm farmer HA!

First I went to Target and chose two storage bins. The bin the worms will live in should be dark colored, not clear. Worms like to be in the dark. Second, grab another bin that fits on the bottom, this bin will serve as a “drip tray” of sorts.

how to make a worm bin

Drill many holes in the bottom of the dark worm bin with the 1/16” bit. Next, use the slightly larger 1/8” bit and drill holes around the top edge of the dark bin. Because the holes are for ventilation, you can’t have too many holes.

pictures of how to make a worm bin

Do not put ANY holes in the bottom ‘drip tray’ bin.

making a worm bin

Now’s the fun part, which is a bit like making a soup – it doesn’t have to be terribly neat, just chuck it in. First, soak and squeeze out your shredded paper, toss in a handful of soil and your worms. When you add scraps make sure to put it under the bedding. Add worms.

easy worm bin instructions

Tips-n-Tricks:

  • As soon as the worm arrive in the mail they are most likely a bit dehydrated, pour a half a cup of water right into their bag/box to help rehydrate them.
  • Keep the worms under a light for the first two days to encourage the worms to explore their new home.
  • To collect the castings, move all the dark, rich castings to one side and add new dampened paper/dirt/food and the worms will migrate from one side to the other.

TA-daaah, you’re done. You are now the proud owner of a worm bin!

Easy Worm Compost Bin Tutorial

This post was submitted by my friend and One Hundred Dollars a Month reader Heather from Massachusetts. If you’ve got a great garden DIY Tutorial you’d like to share it, you could earn you a $20 gift card to Amazon.com for your unique photos and story.

Send Pictures of Your Garden For a Chance to Win a $20 Amazon Gift Card

Here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and for you to show us what you are growing this year.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com {take some deep breaths and contain your excitement}. Go HERE for more info.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Monthly Garden Chores – May

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may garden chores

We are actually getting a few sunny days around here–and my depleted vitamin D levels are started to rebuild.  Since all of my plants can be moved outdoors throughout the month, I’ll be pretty busy planting this month.  {Make sure to check your last frost date first before you move your seedlings out.}

mung bean sprouts

Seeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month

Other than continuing my sprouts, everything will go outdoors now.  Wahoo!

See the full list of seeds I’ll be planting this year

green beans

What I Plan to Transplant Outside this Month

  • Beans {direct sow}
  • Cumin {direct sow}
  • Zucchini {direct sow}
  • Sunflowers {always brings the birds in at the end of the season}
  • Pumpkins {direct sow}
  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Dill {Gotta have it to can my pickles and dilly beans!}
  • Squash {direct sow}
  • Strawberries
  • Flowers
  • Sunflowers
  • Ornamental Corn
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Ornamental Millet
  • Basil

tomato plants 6 weeks

Plants and/or Bulbs I Plan to Purchase this Month

  • Heirloom Tomato Plants {I usually buy several plants from the Seattle Tilth sale}
  • Brussels sprouts

endive lettuce

What I plan to Harvest This Month

  • Swiss Chard
  • Radish
  • Spinach
  • Microgreens
  • Sprouts
  • Over-wintered potatoes
  • Basil
  • Mesclun Lettuce
  • Endive
  • Bok Choy Leaves
  • Oregano

grape hyacinth muscari bulbs

Houseplants, Indoor Bulbs and Outdoor Bulbs

Houseplants should be on a regular feeding and watering schedule now.  If you plan on putting your houseplants outside for the summer, make sure to acclimate them slowly.  Start by placing them outside in the shade for only a couple of hours a day.  Don’t leave them out over night until late May, early June.

Spring bulbs that were forced should be deadheaded and then allowed to die back completely.  If you want to force them again next year, they will need to experience a freeze.  So move the pot outdoors and allow it to sit until December or January {continue watering occasionally}.

mavis butterfield

Trees and Shrubs

This is a good time to prune evergreens.  Also, watch for a huge array of bugs on the trees and work with your local nursery to, well, nip it in the bud.  Losing a tree to an infestation stinks.  If you haven’t pruned the roses, make sure to do it this month.

sluggo for slugs

Weed and Pest Control

Weeding is the name of the game this month.  Weeds will be fighting for prime real estate in your garden and yard, so make a habit of a daily pulling or they can take over and become a massive chore.

lawn mowing tips

Lawn Care

It’s time to start mowing the lawn regularly–I’m sure the HH is sooo excited.  Ha.  Watering lawn deeper/longer with less frequency encourages deeper roots which equals happy grass.  Thatching is also a good idea in May, it will help remove some of the dead grass, making room for new growth.

These garden chores are based on my Zone 8a Seattle/Tacoma WA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Seattle Tilth Spring Plant Sale: May 3rd and May 4th

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Seattle Tilth Edible Plant SaleI LOVE going to the Seattle Tilth Plant Sale each year. Pretty much every gardener in Washington is there. When I go, I’m totally like a kid in a candy store!  It blows me away how many cool plants they have for sale and I always leave with the best deals on the best plants.

A big warning before you go, the sale features over 50,000 organically or sustainably grown plants that are specially chosen by Seattle Tilth’s experts because they are well-adapted to thrive in our Pacific Northwest climate. So knowing that you’ll have tens of thousands of plants to choose from and they’ll all grow like mad in our area, I’d totally suggest driving a U-Haul there! Seattle tilth plant saleThey also have all sorts of gardening presentations and a ton of super smarty pants people there to answer any gardening question you could ever think of.

Here are some of the cool plants you’ll be able to choose from:

  • More than 350 plant varieties for your summer garden, including rare and heirloom varieties
  • Summer crops that love full sun such as tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, squash and melons that can be planted at the end of May or in early June
  • Plants for beginning gardeners such as lettuces, Asian greens, kale, chives, arugula, strawberries, culinary herbs and edible flowers
  • Exotic flavors and colorful vegetables such as sweet chocolate peppers, bulbing fennel, Thai basil, lemon cucumbers, Purple Erdine eggplants, tarragon and striped tomatoes

Seattle tilth plant sale long linesIf you want to avoid the lines,  Gardens to Go can be ordered online in advance. These trays contain an assortment of plants that are pre-selected around different themes. Options include Summer Hits, Container Gardens, Organic Gardening 101 and Edible Plants for Kids. Swing by Meridian Park for a quick pick-up during the sale.

If you want to have first pick of the plants and help raise extra funds for Seattle Tilth, you can buy a ticket for the Early Bird Sale. Don’t want to buy a ticket? The event relies on more than 300 volunteers – sign-up to volunteer and attend the Early Bird Sale at no cost!

seattleSeattle Tilth’s May Edible Plant Sale
Saturday and Sunday, May 3 and 4
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Meridian Park
4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., Seattle
Get directions


This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Improving Garden Soil with Milk and Molasses

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Improving Garden Soil with Milk and Molasses

A big thank you to One Hundred Dollars a Month reader Becky who sent me a link to this article about improving soil with milk and molasses.   I just love it when solutions to life’s problems can be found in  your pantry {I’m still looking for scientific proof that pie can IS actually a solution to most of life’s problems}.

The article, much more eloquently than I can summarize here, states that milk contains vital bacteria that actually helps soil.  When milk is poured over compost it helps to feed the compost–giving it nutrients and helping it break down faster.  Studies have also found that the sugars in milk can’t be digested by insects, so it is an effective insecticide.

Improving Garden Soil with Milk and MolassesMilk even out-performed fungicides when treating powdery mildew on zucchinis and melons.  {Apparently, milk was used as an ancient technique in agriculture, but it the practice has kind of been lost in modern day.}  You can even use milk as a fertilizer.  Apply milk diluted by 20% with water to your garden soil BEFORE planting and voila, instant organic fertilizer.

Molasses has also shown surprising benefits in the garden.  The mineral content of blackstrap molasses, combined with the sugar content, helps to feed microorganisms in the compost pile or garden soil.  An application of 3 tbsp. of molasses combined with 1 cup of milk and 4 cups of water makes an excellent plant food to use throughout the season.  {I seriously can’t wait to try this out.}

For those of you looking to transition to a more organic style of gardening, but still wanting big yields, milk and molasses might totally be worth a try.  I know that I am going to give it a whirl.

~Mavis

 

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Pictures 4/27/14

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backyard garden boxes

If there is one thing I like to see in the backyard garden boxes it’s lot’s of green!

raised garden boxes

I’ve still got about 2 weeks or so until it’s time to set out my tomato plants, but once I do, those garden boxes will be packed full of green goodness. Then all I have to do is maintain everything until harvest time. {My favorite part}. ;) growing onions in raised beds

The red onions and Brussels sprouts are doing great.blooming Viburnum

And check out the giant viburnum hedge we have growing alongside the house. Isn’t she beautiful? We planted this hedge 8 years ago with tiny 1 gallons pots we bought from the Home Depot. Just look at it now! I love viburnum when it’s in bloom. vinca minor

The vinca minor we have growing on the hillside is still flowering. It seems like those tiny purple flowers stick around for a good 2 months. We also have it growing in the front yard as well. Some people don’t like it because it can be a tad bit invasive, but I like it. poppy buds

This seasons first poppy is almost ready.
magnum glass greenhouse

I planted both stock tanks in the greenhouse this week and transplanted the lettuce to the pallet garden. I’ll have to snap a few more pictures and show you what else is going on in there. purple and white tulips

Does anyone know the name of this variety of tulips? I want to pick up a few more this fall. shasta daisy

The shasta daisy mound has almost covered the stump. raspberry patch

Tulips, raspberries, blueberries {to the left} and the pear trees {next to the fence} are all in bloom.

cascadia raspberry plants

Here’s a shot of the raspberry patch from above.

How is YOUR garden doing these days?

Are you happy summer is just around the corner? I know I sure am.

~Mavis

This years garden is being sponsored by the folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2014 Garden Seed Catalog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Control Potato Beetles {Bugs}

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How to Control Potato Beetles {Bugs}

I love getting mail from my readers.  Lately I’ve been getting a lot of gardening questions, and most of them are really common problems, so rather than responding to each email, I thought I would share my response, in case there are more of you out there having the same problem {or even better, some more seasoned gardeners than me who can share some tips in the comments section}.

Sue asked,

Planted potatoes last year and spent most of days picking off potato bugs, saw your idea on potato towers and will try this year. Do you have any ideas on how to control potato bugs? Any advice on them will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks

Bugs are a pain in the you know what when it comes to gardening.  Actually, I shouldn’t say that, because some of them are down right awesome, but the ones that want to eat your food before you do, they, well, “bug” me.

potato leaf with holes

I am not a huge fan of chemicals.  One, because chemicals are not great for you.  And two, because I am too frugal to want to spend good money on something that can be prevented or dealt with another way.  So, my suggestion is to start with prevention.  Companion planting will help to deter them from ever settling in because the smell of the companion plants repel the beetles.  You’ll want to integrate these plants {a variety or just one} in between the rows of your potatoes in order for them to be protective:

  1. Horseradish
  2. Bush Beans
  3. Catnip {put these in small pots around  your potatoes, because they are like mint and will take over}
  4. Cilantro
  5. Sweet Allysum
  6. Fennel
  7. Cosmos
  8. Coriander
  9. Tansy
  10. Marigolds

Another way to prevent them is to use light row covers on your taters from start to finish.  That will keep a barrier between the enemy and your harvest {actually, they don’t typically want the potato, they want the leaves, which just ruins the plant and the potato in the end}.

If you do notice them, try introducing natural predators to the area.  Ladybugs will eat the larvae and destroy them.  Ladybugs must be introduced when the problem already exists, and not as prevention, though, because ladybugs will leave an area if it doesn’t have an immediate food source.  While the ladybugs are fighting the problem, you will have to continue to pick them off by hand.  I personally find pinching them off of the plant kind of therapeutic.

If you really want to throw some sort of something onto the plants to stop the bugs, try diatomaceous earth.  It’s a non-toxic powder that you can dust on the leaves to repel the bugs.  I have not personally used it, but I know a couple of people who swear by it.

I hope that helps, and if any of YOU have some tips for Sue, make sure to leave them in the comments below.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Slow Life

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Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

Okay, so not really a movie, but I thought it was pretty darn cool and decided to share anyway.  This weekend is kind of hectic for us, so I thought this video would be  3 1/2 minutes well spent.

The photographer, Daniel Stoupin, basically wanted to show the underwater world of coral and sponges through time elapse cinematography.  He hoped it would raise awareness as to why the coral reefs are worth preserving.   He did all of his filming in tanks, in order to eliminate filming variables, but you still totally get the picture.  I think kids will love this one–and it will be like you took them snorkeling without the hefty price tag of plane tickets. :)

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Tips for Reseeding Your Lawn in the Spring

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Tips for Reseeding Your Lawn in the Spring

This past weekend the HH and I reseeded our lawn.  Let me tell you Bob, the winter sure wreaks havoc on  your lawn, and with my new goal of working in the garden every day, it has had a lot of foot traffic, which in its delicate state, kind of leaves bare spots.  Bare spots leave space for weeds to invade your lawn.  Weeds are bad.

grass seed

Reseeding will give it that thick carpet like look that all my neighbors will oooh and aaah over, and it’s pretty simple {and inexpensive}.  Spring reseeding is a walk in the park–a soon to be thickly carpeted walk in the park.

First, make sure you buy a seed that is compatible with the temperature.  They make seed that germinates best between 55-65 degree soil temperature for spring reseeding.  You also want to be pretty certain that you will not have another hard freeze after you seed.

Next, give the lawn a quick mow.  This will help remove any leaves and small sticks/twigs that could get in the way {it’s really best to do this a couple of days BEFORE you will be reseeding}.

grass seed reseeding lawn

On the day you plan to reseed, give the whole area a quick rake.  It will loosen the soil a bit and make it ready to receive the seed.  Using a drop spreader {you can also do it by hand, but you may not spread the seed as evenly}, cross the area you will be reseeding in a horizontal pattern, then repeat using a vertical pattern–that way, you make sure you covered the area evenly.  Then, LIGHTLY rake in the seed.  You can lay down a very, very thick layer of compost, soil, or peat moss over the top of the seed if you want {less than 1/4″}.  Water the seed in.  You don’t want to flood the place, so just give it a light watering.  You will want to keep the soil moist until the grass germinates and takes hold.  Then, you can move to letting the soil dry out completely between watering and using a deeper watering plan.

That’s pretty much it.  Make sure you KEEP OFF of the grass while it is germinating.  You wouldn’t go walking on all the little seedlings in your garden, the same principal applies to new grass.  Also, resist mowing the new grass until it is at least 2″ long.

Hopefully, when it is all said and done, the grass really will be greener on the other side.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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