Friday Night at the Movies – Nourish: Food + Community

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In honor of National Food Day yesterday, tonight The Girl and I are going to watch Nourish:  Food + Community.  It’s a PBS documentary that explores the power of real food.  It looks like the documentary focuses on educating our youth on food production, possibility and preparation.  You all know how I love a good food documentary, so I am super excited to check this one out.

nourish  food + community

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

PicMonkey Collage

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

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Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

Yesterday I showed you some pictures of what I currently had growing in our greenhouse. But what I didn’t share was all the dirty window panes and gutters filled with pine needles and weeds.

I even found a little grey mold starting to pop up in some places {which is no surprise given the warm humid temperature in the greenhouse}.  So, yesterday, I hauled everything out of the greenhouse so I could clean and disinfect it.

Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

First things first, as you know, I am not a huge fan of harsh chemicals, so first I used scrubbed down the greenhouse with a little Dawn dishsoap and water with the HH’s car washing supplies. ;) Shhh. Don’t tell him.

Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

It’s actually a pretty good idea to clean your greenhouse at least once a year.  Otherwise, after awhile, it will start to harbor algae, fungus, pests etc. which will wreak havoc on new plantings.  Since I a plan on gardening through the winter, I think I will do a cleaning now, and one again this spring.

Again, since I plan on gardening this winter, the glass in and outside of the greenhouse needs to be spotless.  Any residue will only filter out already sparse winter light. See those giant stock tanks? I’ll be plantings lettuce and beet seedlings in them once I get them filled with some homemade potting soil.

terra-cotta-pots

Greenhouse cleaning time is also a great time to clean out pots and trays.  If you will planting something new in the trays, it is important to rinse and disinfect them.  As for you pots, you can add a little compost and make sure that your next crop plays well with whatever you planted in the pot last.  If not, you may want to empty the potting soil, clean the pot, and get fresh potting soil.

brown slug black spots

After you remove everything from the greenhouse and start to clean, make sure to keep an eye out for pests.  This is like therapy.  You can pick, squish, salt, or sprinkle Sluggo on all of the slugs and other pests that might be trying to winter in your warm greenhouse.  They are like enemies lying in wait, ready to feed on your next crop.  They.Must.Be.Destroyed.

Keep Calm and Garden On.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Plant Tulip Bulbs

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How to plant tulip bulbs tulips

Every spring when my tulips poke through, I am always super happy that I took the time to plant them. They are like a pretty little reminder that winter can’t last forever.

If you plant on planting tulip bulbs this year, here’s a few tips to get you started:

You want to plant tulips about 6 weeks before the first hard ground freeze {heavy frost}.  You can find that date HERE.  First things first:  picking out bulbs.  Make sure to pick plump healthy bulbs.  Soft, shriveled bulbs are a crap shoot–potentially rotten inside with no promise of flowering.

tulip bulbs

Second, dig a hole that is approximately 2-3 times the height of the bulb.  Put the bulb in the hole pointed side up, root side down and cover it with dirt.

parrot tulips

You do not need to water the bulbs, in fact, you shouldn’t.  If they sit in water, they could rot before they have a chance to bloom.  Over the winter, they will receive all of the water they need naturally from the elements.

Basically, they are a super hardy and forgiving plant.  They require planting and then sheer neglect. Ah, if only all relationships could be so simple!

Will you be planting any tulips this fall?

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Greenhouse Gardening in Fall – It’s Time to Pull Up the Tomatoes

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mesclun lettuce mavis butterfield

Yesterday The Girl and I went out to the greenhouse to pick some lettuce for a dinner salad and were happy to see the mesclun lettuce we had planted earlier this fall was perfect for harvesting.
lettuce blend

Look at those leaves!!

Lettuce Mesclun Farmer's Market Blend Seeds

It’s almost November and here I am harvesting gourmet lettuce leaves. Does it get any better than that?

If I had to guess, I have about a 2 weeks worth of dinner salads in the 3-tiered pot I planted. I’m hoping I’ll be able to move the lettuce starts we have growing under grow lights in the house out to the garden by this weekend. Then we’ll see if I can successfully grow lettuce in our greenhouse this winter. {I’m keeping my fingers crossed}.

spinach

I’ve also got some spinach growing in a large pot as well. I can’t remember what variety it is though. Anyone know?

meyer lemon tree

And take a look at Lemon. As of this morning we still have 7 meyer lemons growing in the greenhouse. Not as many as I had hoped for, but I’ll take ‘em. I’m not sure when they are suppose to start turning yellow, but I suspect sometime in December or January.

sungold

Did I mention our tomatoes are on their way out?

Yep, these are the last of the Sun Gold tomatoes. :(

tomatoes grey mold stems

And what about the Green Zebra tomatoes you ask? Well… they’re dead.

tomatoes grey mold

Take a look at all the grey mold that has set in. Kinda creepy isn’t it?

Yep, it’s totally time to say goodbye to our heirloom tomatoes for the year and get the greenhouse prepared for winter. It’s coming, whether we want it to our not.

Do any of YOU have any tomatoes still growing? Are they on their last leg too or did you say goodbye to yours months ago?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 10/23/2013 Garden Tally

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dirt soil garden beds

 

Last week the only thing I harvested was 3 ounces of chives. Whoop. T. Do.

But, I did plant an entire bed with winter carrots and radishes, so that kind of makes up for it, right? :) Even though there isn’t a whole lot going on in the garden these days harvest wise, I do have some major clean up projects on the agenda.

It’s just finding the time to get them all done that’s the hard part.

seedlings grow lights

Right now we have lettuce, basil and beets  growing under the grow lights I have set up on my desk in the office. I plan on growing the basil indoors, moving the lettuce to the greenhouse and the beets to a garden beds next week.

Are you indoor gardening this fall too? If so, I’d love to hear about it.

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

fresh basil

Basil – 1 pound 3 ounces

We’ve got basil growing under the grow lights. In the past we’ve enjoyed making fresh pesto and strawberry basil jam with it.

beets

Beets – 133 pounds 12 ounces

We’ve got plenty of beets in the ground to use, just have to find the time to work them into our dinner menu.

organic gardening bok choy

Bok Choy – 7 pounds

We didn’t end up growing too much bok choy this year, but it’s on the list for 2014.

broccoli

Broccoli – 13 ounces

Our broccoli plants are doing great and I’m looking forward to a late fall harvest. Girly Girl stole most my plants.

head of cabbage

Cabbage - 40 pounds 14 ounce

We are still waiting to harvest our fall cabbage. I feel like I keep saying that but cabbage totally has a mind of it’s own.

carrot seedlings
Carrots – 43 pounds 11 ounces

I didn’t pull up any carrots this past week but we’ve still got carrots growing in 3 different garden beds. I’m hoping these ones will be my Valentine Carrots.

chives

Chives – 2 pound 8 ounces

We regular chives and garlic chives growing right now. I harvested a whopping 3 ounces of chives last week for a baked potato party.

burpless-cucumbers

Cucumbers 9 pound 6 ounces

Our cucumbers are done for the season. ‘ll be buying hothouse cucumbers at Costco until next summer. There English cucumbers are the best deal around.

chicken scraps

Egg Count – 2,197

Sadly The Girl did not keep track of the egg count last week while I was away so I can’t update it. Boo!!

elephant garlic bulb

Garlic 9 pounds 2 ounces

We planted our garlic a few weeks ago, I haven’t seen anything coming up through the soil yet, but it should be soon.

garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes 11 ounces

We use them to make Garlic Scape Pesto.

green beans

Green Beans 17 pounds 11 ounces

kale

Kale – 42 pounds 14 ounces

I have it growing alongside the chicken coop. Lucy Puggle sneaks a bit every once in a while but mostly, I grow it for the chickens.

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 5 pounds 10 ounces

romaine lettuce

Lettuce – 37 pounds 3 ounces

Note to self – Harvest lettuce in greenhouse.

microgreens

Microgreens 5 ounces

blueberry jam with mint recipe

Mint 13 oz

I made some blueberry mint jam this summer.

oregano container herb garden

Oregano - 1 pound 12 ounces

I used fresh oregano in my heirloom tomato sauce this summer.

onions

Onion – 37 pounds 8 ounces

basket of pears

Pears 47 pounds 7 ounces

Pear butter is AWESOME!

growing peas in a greenhosue

Peas – 42 pounds 9 ounces

Note to self: Pick greenhouse peas.

red potatoes

Potatoes - 319 pounds

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter.

2 weeks asgo while I was clearing the pumpkin patch I also dug up a few of the potatoes we planted beneath the pumpkin mounds. So far I’ve only dug up about 19 pounds, but there is a boatload more to be dug up. Maybe I’ll have Monkey Boy help me with this today. We’ll see.

french breakfast radishes

Radish - 22 pounds 2 ounces

I planted radish seeds last week.

bucket of raspberries

Raspberries – 21 pounds 7 ounces

rhubarb

Rhubarb – 39 pounds 9 ounces

purple sage

Sage – 14 ounces

wheelbarrow pumpkins squash

Squash 230 pounds 10 ounces

After all was said and done we ended up with 230 pounds of pumpkins. Not what I was hoping for. My pumpkin crop totally failed this year due to poor crop rotation. Some years are good, and other, not so much.

fresh organic spinach

Spinach - 15 ounces

I planted more in the greenhouse for a winter harvest. :)

mung bean sprouts

Sprouts -2 pounds 15 ounces

Here are instructions for growing your own sprouts.

strawberries in wooden basket

Strawberries 23 pounds 14 ounces

Strawberry season is over for the year.

garden swiss chard

Swiss Chard 52 pounds 4 ounces

Gag. Our backyard chickens love it and it’s great for trading.

sungold tomatoes

Tomatoes 234 pounds 15 ounces

I need to check on the tomatoes we have growing in the greenhouse. It’s getting to be about that time of year when they need to be pulled up. I was hoping to grow them into November but we’ll see.

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

zucchini

Zucchini – 72 pounds 13 ounces

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 1455 pounds 0 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 2,197 {+more that we forgot to count}

If you are new to gardening or just want to learn more about organic gardening, my #1 favorite garden book is The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food By Tanya L.K. Denckla.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Make a Lasagna Garden

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How to Make a Lasagna Garden

I’ve decided to turn up the potato patch and make the area into a lasagna garden this fall.  Then, next spring, I think I’ll plant the pumpkin patch there.  I mean, really, it’s crop rotation at its finest.

A lasagna garden is basically layering organic materials {like making a lasagna} to create a rich, no till space later on down the road.  I’ve heard a lot of organic farmers say they don’t grow vegetables, but instead, they grow healthy dirt.  I’ve always liked that—so this winter, I am going to grow me some healthy dirt.

How to Make a Lasagna Garden

To start a lasagna garden, you basically need no preparation.  You literally do not need to weed or dig down.

If you are starting with sod, you don’t need to dig it up.  Your first layer of your lasagna garden is either corrugated cardboard or 3 layers of newspaper {whatever you have more readily on hand}.  This first layer will suffocate grass and weeds, hence the need to do nothing to prepare the garden.  After you have laid the first layer of the garden down, wet it thoroughly to begin the breakdown process.

fall leaves

Now comes the really fun part:  the next layers are literally everything you would put into your compost pile.  Grass clippings, food stuffs, newspaper, leaves from the city park, junk mail {avoid any envelopes with little plastic viewing windows, though}, The only rule you really want to follow here is alternating layers of browns and greens–one layer of dried leaves, next layer food stuffs or grass clippings.

Each time you make a layer, water it down.  Repeat the process until your “lasagna” is about 2 feet high.  It will break down fairly quickly—so you can assure your neighbors you are not giving up on social norms and just tossing your trash out back.

By spring, you should have an amazing patch of dirt that is already loose and prepared to grow an awesome crop.

Have you ever done a lasagna garden before?  Did it leave you with awesome dirt?

~Mavis

lasagna gardening book

For more lasagna gardening tips and tricks check out Lasagna Gardening: A New Layering System for Bountiful Gardens: No Digging, No Tilling, No Weeding, No Kidding!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Garden Photos from Fairbanks, Alaska

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garden boxes

Hello! My husband, Christopher, and I (Shannon) live in Fairbanks, Alaska. We actually just met October 2012 and married this July, and this is a story of our first garden together.

starting seeds indoors

Most of the pictures here are his handiwork. Here in Alaska, we must start many of our plants inside, sometimes months ahead of time. Temperatures dip to 55 below zero, and winter lasts into May. Also, we have more darkness than light until summer. We don’t have a lot of space in our house (less than 1000 sq. ft.). Thus, we placed our “starts” in our bedroom under grow lights. Christopher already had this set up.

garden beds tires

Before I knew him, I only used window sills. We started everything from seed except for some flowers. We started in smaller, more typical six-pack type containers we both already had. We eat a lot of yogurt, and used these containers and others left for free at the transfer station (along with other improvised containers) for planters later on.

raised garden beds

Eventually, we ran out of space in this indoor greenhouse. So, starts ended up transplanted several times and then took over our living room. We had pumpkins growing up our curtains! We (read: I) ‘may’ have gotten a little carried away with the pumpkins this year and planted them a bit early (February – early April likely would have been fine).

poly tunnel

We were starting to get a little crowded and crazy from all the plants. We do have a small pop up greenhouse, but it is pretty small and unheated. We couldn’t put plants in it until the danger of frost had passed. Once they were outside, our living room felt HUGE!

The house we live in is the house I had before I met Christopher, and it had three planting beds: two on the above-ground septic tank (the house is on permafrost), and one “sunken canoe.” I had built a fourth bed at the end of the last growing season (August) out of scrap lumber, but didn’t plant anything in it.

peppers greenhouse

Thus, we decided to expand. We (read: Christopher) used scrap lumber and tires scavenged from one of Fairbanks’ transfer stations. We planted carrots from seed early, and you can see we covered them with plastic to help keep in moisture. Our water situation here is typical for Fairbanks but might surprise others “Outside” (term used to refer to outside of Alaska).

We have a 1500 gallon insulated above ground tank and a truck comes to deliver water at about 10 cents/gallon. Otherwise, we can haul our own water or collect it in rain barrels. We do/did the latter two options for obvious reasons until the very end of summer when we both got really busy.

For a while our yard looked like a construction site. This drove me crazy. Keep in mind; most of our plants are still inside. We did this construction in May, and it was still freezing at night.

tomatoes

We did not have enough time or energy (did I mention we got married in July?) to make as many beds as we wanted. So, our tomatoes ended up staying in pots, as did our peppers. We built a hoop house for our peppers to help control moisture and keep the heat up. Next year, we plan on building a bed for our pepper plants.

cinderella pumpkins

We will likely also build a new bed for potatoes. We used most of the flowers we grew for wedding decorations (outdoor wedding at a friend’s house). We also grew herbs on our deck and I window sills. The rock walkway leading up to the tires (containing French Cinderella pumpkin plants) were scavenged from the property and from the (dirt) road. Eventually, our garden grew and grew.

chicks

Did I mention we also raised meat chickens? We bought 20 “black boiler” chicks. This property came with this pre-build dog condo/chicken coop thing with its own fenced-in yard. You can see our coop (and our very own pallet compost bin) in one of these pictures. The hanging feeder pictured below was made of an old hub cap I had picked up in the woods a while ago for some unknown hoarding reason and a stove pipe from a friend.

Black broilers are not the most “fast growing” or largest chicken variety (not the type that reaches adulthood in 6 weeks). We’ve heard this is a variety commonly raised in Europe for sale in stores. They were fed good feed, lots of veggie scraps, and weeds. They eventually ate all the fireweed (wildflowers growing in one of the pictures) growing in their pen.

We slaughtered them ourselves at 10 weeks. Some of the chickens were a little smaller than we wanted (slightly larger than a Cornish hen), but we were ready to be done with chickens, as we had traveling to do. You can see the contraption we made for this task in one of our garden pictures (from scrap wood, and I found one of the traffic cones). We rented a chicken plucker machine for $20 from someone on Craigslist to ease the task. They taste great!

If we are in this house next year (we may move so we can expand our family), we will insulate the coop so we can keep layers year-round. Of course, we will use blueboard insulation we already have (came from Christopher’s old property).

carrots

We had a hard frost in late August. Luckily, we had harvested all the sensitive plants before then (except for a bunch of green tomatoes that are now in a freezer).I must say, I am so thankful to have found a man that loves to garden and “homestead” as much as me.

cinderela pumpkins

We have blanched, frozen, and canned all this bounty (that we haven’t shared). We also have moose and 40 Copper River “reds” (sockeye) salmon we harvested in a freezer. I’m slightly obsessed with berry- picking, so we also have 15 gallons of wild blueberries, as well as a few gallons each of wild cranberries and raspberries. Alaska is a bountiful place if you know how to harvest her resources (responsibly, of course!).

~Shannon from Fairbanks, Alaska.

garden boxes

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

~Mavis

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Foyle’s War

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Last week, I started London Hospital–and for the record, I’m hooked.  Thanks to readers Janet and Linda, now I have a new series to add to the list.  This Friday, I am going to start Foyle’s War.  It’s about a detective who investigates wartime crimes in England {War time being WWII}.  It gets a solid 5 stars on Amazon, combines drama with historical accuracy, and is set in a small coastal town in England.  I’m pretty sure it has Mavis written all over it.  {Thanks again for the suggestion!}

foyles war

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

PicMonkey Collage

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Gardening in October

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strawberries

I was walking around the garden yesterday and spotted a few Tri-Star strawberries and decided to snap some pictures to show you what’s growing in our backyard garden right now.

We live in Western Washington and usually don’t get freezing temps until around the beginning to mid November, so even though it doesn’t look like there is much growing when I post photos of our garden as a whole, we still have lot’s of edibles.

fava beans

The Fava Beans we planted last month are now about 4 inches tall. If you have never planted fava beans before they LOVE the cool temps and are a great cover crop if you are looking in enrich your soil.

beets

We have oodles of Detroit Dark Red Beets growing right now and will have plenty for a Thanksgiving harvest.

rainbow swiss chard

Rainbow Swiss Chard. Yep, we’ve got plenty of that too. ;)

artichoke

One of the more surprising vegetables we having growing right now is Artichokes. I started these from seed this January and am still amazed at how well they are growing this late in the season.

carrots

One of my goals this year is to try and over winter some Danvers Carrots. I’ve heard plenty of people say that growing carrots in the winter is super easy as long as they are protected a little bit. Once the temperatures dip I’m going to cover them with straw and hope for the best. I think as long as we don’t get a super hard freeze, we should be okay.

purple cauliflower

Mama Mia, check out the Purple Cauliflower. Isn’t it cool? I bet parents could get their kids to eat more cauliflower if they served them purple cauliflower at the dinner table.

Broccoli Romanesco

All the other vegetables are nice, but this head of Broccoli Romanesco is my favorite. It just has a certain cool factor to it. It’s like what hipsters who play bongos and backpack around Europe would eat.

It’s like totally out there man. ;)

Ha!

So how is YOUR garden doing these days? Are you still pulling up vegetables?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 10/16/2013 Garden Tally

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garden boxes

This past week we harvested squash, potatoes, tomatoes and kale from our backyard garden. Things have totally slowed down because of the colder temperatures, but I don’t mind. I think it’s kind of nice because it give me more time to get a few projects crossed of my list both indoors and out.

grow lights seedlings

Last week we set up the grow lights and the lettuce, basil and beets we planted are all up. I plan on growing the basil indoors, moving the lettuce to the greenhouse and the beets to a garden bed once the seedlings get a little bigger.

Gardening is cool no matter if you do it indoors or out.

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

fresh basil

Basil – 1 pound 3 ounces

We’ve got basil growing under the grow lights. Hopefully by Christmas we’ll have a boatload of fresh basil. In the past we’ve enjoyed making fresh pesto and strawberry basil jam with it.

beets

Beets – 133 pounds 12 ounces

We’ve still got plenty of beets in the garden and we just started some indoors as well.

organic gardening bok choy

Bok Choy – 7 pounds

We pulled up all the remaining bok choy a while back and tossed it to the chickens. I don’t think I’ll plant it again until next spring.

broccoli

Broccoli – 13 ounces

Our broccoli plants are doing great and I’m looking forward to a late fall harvest. Girly Girl stole almost all my plants. We won’t have a huge harvest this year, but we should get atleast a few dinners and side dishes out of it.

head of cabbage

Cabbage - 40 pounds 14 ounce

Still waiting to harvest our fall cabbage!

carrots

Carrots – 43 pounds 11 ounces

I didn’t pull up any carrots this past week but we’ve still got quite a few in the ground.

chives

Chives – 2 pound 5 ounces

We regular chives and garlic chives growing right now.

burpless-cucumbers

Cucumbers 9 pound 6 ounces

Our cucumbers are done for the season. I guess this means I’ll be buying hothouse cucumbers at Costco until next summer.

chicken scraps

Egg Count – 2,197

This past week we collected 58 eggs. Happy chickens make happy eggs.

elephant garlic bulb

Garlic 9 pounds 2 ounces

We planted our garlic a few weeks ago and it should be ready sometime in July of 2014. :)

garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes 11 ounces

We use them to make Garlic Scape Pesto.

green beans

Green Beans 17 pounds 11 ounces

Our green beans are officially done for the year. Now if I want some fresh green beans I’ll have to get them from the grocery store. Booo!

kale

Kale – 42 pounds 14 ounces

I grow it along side the chicken coop for the chickens.

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 5 pounds 10 ounces

romaine lettuce

Lettuce – 37 pounds 3 ounces

We currently have lettuce growing in the greenhouse and just started some under grow lights for a winter harvest.

microgreens

Microgreens 5 ounces

I need to jump back on the microgreen train. It’s been awhile since I’ve grown some bean sprouts.

blueberry jam with mint recipe

Mint 13 oz

I made some blueberry mint jam this summer and also harvested some mint for tea.

oregano container herb garden

Oregano - 1 pound 12 ounces

I been using fresh oregano for my heirloom tomato sauce.

onions

Onion – 37 pounds 8 ounces

While I was cleaning out the garden boxes over the weekend I found a few more onions growing beneath the tomato plants. We might have a few more out in the raspberry patch yet to harvest but I’m not sure.

basket of pears

Pears 47 pounds 7 ounces

Pear butter is AWESOME!

growing peas in a greenhosue

Peas – 42 pounds 9 ounces

We’ve got peas growing in the greenhouse and in a garden box. Hopefully we’ll get some fresh peas soon.

red potatoes

Potatoes - 319 pounds

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter.

Last week while I was clearing the pumpkin patch I also dug up a few of the potatoes we planted beneath the pumpkin mounds. So far I’ve only dug up about 19 pounds, but there’s more to be dug up.

My original plan was to dig them all up at once, but now I’m thinking I may just wait until just before the first frost. We’ll see.

french breakfast radishes

Radish - 22 pounds 2 ounces

Planting seeds today!

bucket of raspberries

Raspberries – 21 pounds 7 ounces

Raspberry season is officially over in our backyard. :(

rhubarb

Rhubarb – 39 pounds 9 ounces

purple sage

Sage – 14 ounces

We are using sage as we need it.

wheelbarrow pumpkins squash

Squash 230 pounds 10 ounces

Last week I got started on clearing the pumpkin patch. After all was said and done we ended up with an additional 122+ pounds of pumpkins. Not bad, but not great in my opinion. My pumpkin crop totally failed this year due to poor crop rotation and I didn’t end up with any giant ones. I’ve learned my lesson though so hopefully next year I’ll be able to grow more.

fresh organic spinach

Spinach - 15 ounces

I planted more in the greenhouse for a winter harvest.

mung bean sprouts

Sprouts -2 pounds 15 ounces

Here are instructions for growing your own sprouts.

strawberries in wooden basket

Strawberries 23 pounds 14 ounces

Strawberry season is over for the year.

Besides eating them fresh we made strawberry kiwi jam, strawberry freezer jam, strawberry pie, and homemade strawberry shortcake.

garden swiss chard

Swiss Chard 52 pounds 4 ounces

Our backyard chickens love it and it’s great for trading.

sungold tomatoes

Tomatoes 234 pounds 15 ounces

We picked 5 Green Zebra and a handful of Sun Gold tomatoes this past week from the greenhouse. The greenhouse tomatoes days are totally numbered, but we’ll take what we can get. ;)

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

zucchini

Zucchini – 72 pounds 13 ounces

I harvested our last zucchini over the weekend. This was not a good zucchini year for us, which is really odd because they grow like crazy around here.

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 1454 pounds 13 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 2,197

If you are new to gardening or just want to learn more about organic gardening, my #1 favorite garden book is The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food By Tanya L.K. Denckla.

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