Friday Night at the Movies – Foyle’s War

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Last week, I started London Hospital–and for the record, I’m hooked.  Thanks to readers Janet and Linda, now I have a new series to add to the list.  This Friday, I am going to start Foyle’s War.  It’s about a detective who investigates wartime crimes in England {War time being WWII}.  It gets a solid 5 stars on Amazon, combines drama with historical accuracy, and is set in a small coastal town in England.  I’m pretty sure it has Mavis written all over it.  {Thanks again for the suggestion!}

foyles war

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

PicMonkey Collage

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Mavis Garden Blog – Gardening in October

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strawberries

I was walking around the garden yesterday and spotted a few Tri-Star strawberries and decided to snap some pictures to show you what’s growing in our backyard garden right now.

We live in Western Washington and usually don’t get freezing temps until around the beginning to mid November, so even though it doesn’t look like there is much growing when I post photos of our garden as a whole, we still have lot’s of edibles.

fava beans

The Fava Beans we planted last month are now about 4 inches tall. If you have never planted fava beans before they LOVE the cool temps and are a great cover crop if you are looking in enrich your soil.

beets

We have oodles of Detroit Dark Red Beets growing right now and will have plenty for a Thanksgiving harvest.

rainbow swiss chard

Rainbow Swiss Chard. Yep, we’ve got plenty of that too. ;)

artichoke

One of the more surprising vegetables we having growing right now is Artichokes. I started these from seed this January and am still amazed at how well they are growing this late in the season.

carrots

One of my goals this year is to try and over winter some Danvers Carrots. I’ve heard plenty of people say that growing carrots in the winter is super easy as long as they are protected a little bit. Once the temperatures dip I’m going to cover them with straw and hope for the best. I think as long as we don’t get a super hard freeze, we should be okay.

purple cauliflower

Mama Mia, check out the Purple Cauliflower. Isn’t it cool? I bet parents could get their kids to eat more cauliflower if they served them purple cauliflower at the dinner table.

Broccoli Romanesco

All the other vegetables are nice, but this head of Broccoli Romanesco is my favorite. It just has a certain cool factor to it. It’s like what hipsters who play bongos and backpack around Europe would eat.

It’s like totally out there man. ;)

Ha!

So how is YOUR garden doing these days? Are you still pulling up vegetables?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 10/16/2013 Garden Tally

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garden boxes

This past week we harvested squash, potatoes, tomatoes and kale from our backyard garden. Things have totally slowed down because of the colder temperatures, but I don’t mind. I think it’s kind of nice because it give me more time to get a few projects crossed of my list both indoors and out.

grow lights seedlings

Last week we set up the grow lights and the lettuce, basil and beets we planted are all up. I plan on growing the basil indoors, moving the lettuce to the greenhouse and the beets to a garden bed once the seedlings get a little bigger.

Gardening is cool no matter if you do it indoors or out.

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

fresh basil

Basil – 1 pound 3 ounces

We’ve got basil growing under the grow lights. Hopefully by Christmas we’ll have a boatload of fresh basil. In the past we’ve enjoyed making fresh pesto and strawberry basil jam with it.

beets

Beets – 133 pounds 12 ounces

We’ve still got plenty of beets in the garden and we just started some indoors as well.

organic gardening bok choy

Bok Choy – 7 pounds

We pulled up all the remaining bok choy a while back and tossed it to the chickens. I don’t think I’ll plant it again until next spring.

broccoli

Broccoli – 13 ounces

Our broccoli plants are doing great and I’m looking forward to a late fall harvest. Girly Girl stole almost all my plants. We won’t have a huge harvest this year, but we should get atleast a few dinners and side dishes out of it.

head of cabbage

Cabbage - 40 pounds 14 ounce

Still waiting to harvest our fall cabbage!

carrots

Carrots – 43 pounds 11 ounces

I didn’t pull up any carrots this past week but we’ve still got quite a few in the ground.

chives

Chives – 2 pound 5 ounces

We regular chives and garlic chives growing right now.

burpless-cucumbers

Cucumbers 9 pound 6 ounces

Our cucumbers are done for the season. I guess this means I’ll be buying hothouse cucumbers at Costco until next summer.

chicken scraps

Egg Count – 2,197

This past week we collected 58 eggs. Happy chickens make happy eggs.

elephant garlic bulb

Garlic 9 pounds 2 ounces

We planted our garlic a few weeks ago and it should be ready sometime in July of 2014. :)

garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes 11 ounces

We use them to make Garlic Scape Pesto.

green beans

Green Beans 17 pounds 11 ounces

Our green beans are officially done for the year. Now if I want some fresh green beans I’ll have to get them from the grocery store. Booo!

kale

Kale – 42 pounds 14 ounces

I grow it along side the chicken coop for the chickens.

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 5 pounds 10 ounces

romaine lettuce

Lettuce – 37 pounds 3 ounces

We currently have lettuce growing in the greenhouse and just started some under grow lights for a winter harvest.

microgreens

Microgreens 5 ounces

I need to jump back on the microgreen train. It’s been awhile since I’ve grown some bean sprouts.

blueberry jam with mint recipe

Mint 13 oz

I made some blueberry mint jam this summer and also harvested some mint for tea.

oregano container herb garden

Oregano - 1 pound 12 ounces

I been using fresh oregano for my heirloom tomato sauce.

onions

Onion – 37 pounds 8 ounces

While I was cleaning out the garden boxes over the weekend I found a few more onions growing beneath the tomato plants. We might have a few more out in the raspberry patch yet to harvest but I’m not sure.

basket of pears

Pears 47 pounds 7 ounces

Pear butter is AWESOME!

growing peas in a greenhosue

Peas – 42 pounds 9 ounces

We’ve got peas growing in the greenhouse and in a garden box. Hopefully we’ll get some fresh peas soon.

red potatoes

Potatoes - 319 pounds

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter.

Last week while I was clearing the pumpkin patch I also dug up a few of the potatoes we planted beneath the pumpkin mounds. So far I’ve only dug up about 19 pounds, but there’s more to be dug up.

My original plan was to dig them all up at once, but now I’m thinking I may just wait until just before the first frost. We’ll see.

french breakfast radishes

Radish - 22 pounds 2 ounces

Planting seeds today!

bucket of raspberries

Raspberries – 21 pounds 7 ounces

Raspberry season is officially over in our backyard. :(

rhubarb

Rhubarb – 39 pounds 9 ounces

purple sage

Sage – 14 ounces

We are using sage as we need it.

wheelbarrow pumpkins squash

Squash 230 pounds 10 ounces

Last week I got started on clearing the pumpkin patch. After all was said and done we ended up with an additional 122+ pounds of pumpkins. Not bad, but not great in my opinion. My pumpkin crop totally failed this year due to poor crop rotation and I didn’t end up with any giant ones. I’ve learned my lesson though so hopefully next year I’ll be able to grow more.

fresh organic spinach

Spinach - 15 ounces

I planted more in the greenhouse for a winter harvest.

mung bean sprouts

Sprouts -2 pounds 15 ounces

Here are instructions for growing your own sprouts.

strawberries in wooden basket

Strawberries 23 pounds 14 ounces

Strawberry season is over for the year.

Besides eating them fresh we made strawberry kiwi jam, strawberry freezer jam, strawberry pie, and homemade strawberry shortcake.

garden swiss chard

Swiss Chard 52 pounds 4 ounces

Our backyard chickens love it and it’s great for trading.

sungold tomatoes

Tomatoes 234 pounds 15 ounces

We picked 5 Green Zebra and a handful of Sun Gold tomatoes this past week from the greenhouse. The greenhouse tomatoes days are totally numbered, but we’ll take what we can get. ;)

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

zucchini

Zucchini – 72 pounds 13 ounces

I harvested our last zucchini over the weekend. This was not a good zucchini year for us, which is really odd because they grow like crazy around here.

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 1454 pounds 13 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 2,197

If you are new to gardening or just want to learn more about organic gardening, my #1 favorite garden book is The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food By Tanya L.K. Denckla.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Find Vegetable Starts for Your Garden In October – Steal Them From Your Neighbor

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fall vegetables in garden

I got a call from Chino the Handyman yesterday.

He had just finished building a house and they were getting ready to put the house on the market.

The open house is tomorrow.

Chino: “I built 3 large garden boxes {I hear they’re all the rage} and I need some vegetables to stick in them and the only thing the nursey has is ornamental cabbage. Do you have any plants I can come over and dig up?”

Mavis: “What? You want to steal my plants?”

Swiss chard

Chino: “Well actually I’m sending Girly Girl over to steal them. Gardening is for girls.”

Mavis: “Ahhh, I see.”

Swiss chard

Before I could ask anymore questions {or say no}, Girly Girl was in my driveway with her shovel in hand. So we dug up vegetables. It all happened so fast I didn’t even have a chance to ask Chino what he was planning to barter my picture perfect vegetables for.

He’s a hunter you know… and isn’t hunting season right around the corner?

All I know is she took a bunch of Swiss chard {high five anyone?} so I’m happy. Swiss chard for free range meat? Heck yeah I’ll make that trade.

boy with chicken barred rock rooster

Now if I could just somehow convince Girly Girl to take one of the baby roos in exchange for a rump roast all would be good in the world. Fat chance though. Apparently Girly Girl knows a baby roo when she sees one. :( I even tried convincing her little man that having a boy chicken would be a lot of fun. He begged, I begged, but Girly Girl said no.
leeks

At the end of her pillaging, she drove away with 10 broccoli plants, a dozen leeks…

leeks Swiss chardand a boatload of Swiss chard.

Now, the question is, how much meat do you think all those full grown vegetable starts are worth? 1 pound? 5 pounds? 10 pounds?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

10 Cool Uses for Fall Leaves

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10 cool uses for fall leaves

Let’s be honest, raking and bagging leaves stinks.  Actually, for me, it’s the bagging them that I am not a fan of–so here’s 10 cool ways to put those leaves to use other than bagging them for the garbage man:

  1. Compost them.  Leaves are a perfect addition to the compost pile, plus they won’t take up room in the landfill.
  2. Cover your garden beds with them as a winter mulch.  {Make sure the leaves come from healthy trees though–no reason to introduce disease into your garden soil.}
  3. Mow them.  Take an ashes to ashes, dust to dust approach, and allow your lawn to benefit from the nutrients left the leaves.
  4. Make a leaf mold to enrich your garden.  Place leaves in a garbage bag, moisten them and tie the bag shut.  {You’ll want to find a place out of sight to leave the garbage bag so it won’t be an eyesore.}  Different leaves breakdown at different rates, but you could have a batch of nutrient rich leaf mold in as little as 6 months.
  5. Make a scarecrow and use dried leaves as the stuffing, instead of straw.
  6. Get two glass vases, one smaller than the other so that it will nest in the larger vase.  Place gathered leaves in the outer jar and a candle in the inner jar for an easy Autumn centerpiece on your table.
  7. Press the leaves {before they become brittle} in a heavy book.  Then, using spray glue, glue them to festive paper and frame them for easy fall decor.
  8. Use pine cones and leaves to make a fall wreath.
  9. Attach them to a long ribbon, using hot glue or spray glue to create a fall garland.
  10. Modge podge them to a pumpkin for a cool addition to your front porch.

How about you, do YOU have any cool ways to use up those fall leaves?

~Mavis

See more Cool Uses for other common items.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 41 of 52

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winter gardening garden boxes

Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 41 of 52

fava beans

Even though the growing season is winding down, there are still plenty of vegetables to see in our backyard garden. The fava beans I planted a few weeks ago are doing well and are now about 4 inches tall. I planted these as a cover crop to give the soil in this bed a boost next spring.

square foot garden

The kale tree is still hanging in there, and the Swiss chard is alive and kicking too.

bark dirt

The potato patch and bean tepees are gone, but I have a cool idea on how to use this space for next year. Would you believe I’ve already starting mapping out next years garden? I’m a total nerd.

magnum glass greenhouseThe nighttime temps have been in the mid 40′s lately so everything in our unheated greenhouse is still alive. We still have a couple of tomato plants that are producing as well as lettuce, peas and our lemon tree.

purple cabbage

Every time I check on our purple cabbage plants there are a few more tiny holes in them. I’m not sure what kind of bug is munching on the outer leaves, but hopefully they’ll stay away from the main heads of cabbage long enough for us to harvest them.

wooded backyard

A view of the backyard.

pumpkin patch

The pumpkin patch. We picked the pumpkins earlier this week so now all that’s left is cleaning up the growing area.

omlet chicken coop eglu cube

The chicken coop.
rainbow swiss chard

Yep, we’ve got plenty of Swiss chard.

kale

And kale. The chickens love their kale.raspberry patch

And last but not least, the raspberry patch.

Winter is on its way that’s for sure. Let’s hope I can finish up the rest of my fall garden chores before the weather gets too nasty.

Peace Out Girl Scouts I’m off to go hang out with The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird.

Have a great Sunday,

Mavis

buy garlic online

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my online boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

Up for a tour? Read about our behind the scenes tour of Botanical Interests Seed Company.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – London Hospital

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I apparently must watch a lot of BBC shows, because in my search for a movie this week, London Hospital popped up as a suggestion.  I don’t know how I hadn’t found it until now–it totally looks like a show I’m gonna love.  Like Call the Midwife, it is set in East London in the early 1900′s.

It follows the lives of the nurses, doctors, and patients, kind of like a Grey’s Anatomy, only with a lot more substance.  And, true to form, the BBC has tried to get most of their stories from the journals of the nurses and doctors.  I can’t wait to dive into this series.

london hospital

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it. I may just have to stay in bed all weekend and watch the entire series. ;)

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

PicMonkey Collage

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Cleaning Up the Pumpkin Patch

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yellow acorn squash

Yesterday I spent part of the afternoon picking the remaining pumpkins and squash. Maybe I’m weird, but I always feel sort of bad for all the little squash that don’t make it.

pumpkin patch

If only they had another month to grow, or if the weather was warmer… they’d all have a chance to reach their full potential. wheelbarrow pumpkins squash

These were the last of them. I’m hoping that once I place the greenish orange pumpkins on the porch they’ll ripen in time for Halloween. If not, I suppose I’ll just cut them in half and give them to the chickens to munch on.

red potatoes

Do you remember me telling you I planted 1 seed potato beneath each pumpkin mound?

weird odd shaped potatoes vegetables

Well I did. And even though I didn’t get a chance to harvest the potatoes yesterday {these ones popped through the soil as I was pulling up the spent pumpkin vines} I plan on harvesting the rest of our spuds today. {I see a bear and a duck, what do you see?}

weedsAnd then I’ll spend the rest of my garden time clearing the area of weeds and other random plants that sowed themselves into our pumpkin patch this year.

Gardening is fun, even if you forget to rotate your crops and end up with a small harvest.

Life is good.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Keep Carrots, Potatoes and Beets Fresh All Winter

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How to Keep Carrots, Potatoes and Beets Fresh All WinterMichelle writes:

How do you cure root crops like potatoes and carrots to last longer than a couple weeks? I’ll be tipping over 2 of my three potato towers to see how that turned out but now wondering how on earth I preserve potatoes for an extended time. I’d like to try to grow 100+ pounds next year but gotta learn how to preserve my bounty. Lots of lessons learned this year of how to do gardening so hopefully next year is MUCH better!

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter

Good question, Michelle.  First things first, before you plant anything, remember that some varieties store much better than others.  This is particularly true of potatoes with russet, Yukon gold, and Kennebec all being top choices for storing longer.

To cure potatoes, lay then out on newspaper in a cool, dark, and well-ventilated place.  Let them sit there for about 2 weeks, that will give their skin a chance to toughen up for storage.  Don’t wash the potatoes until you are ready to use them.  To find out how to properly store them, go HERE.  Make sure to check them regularly throughout the winter–even the best practices still yields rotting potatoes, if you catch them and throw them out, they won’t spoil the whole lot.

heirloom carrots

For carrots and beets, remove the tops {the green parts} because they will pull moisture from the actual carrot, making them dry and cracked.  For smaller amounts, place unwashed carrots/beets in ziploc bags, seal tightly to ensure no air is coming in, and store them in the coldest part of your fridge.

carrotsphoto credit

For larger crops, take unwashed carrots/beets {make sure none of them are damaged in anyway–those ones will spoil quickly} and cut off the leaves as close to the base of the edible part as you possible can without damaging it.  Brush off any loose dirt and then place the carrots/beets in boxes full of SLIGHTLY damp sand, alternating rows of carrots/beets with rows of sand.

heirloom beets

For larger crops, take unwashed carrots/beets {make sure none of them are damaged in anyway–those ones will spoil quickly} and cut off the leaves as close to the base of the edible part as you possible can without damaging it.  Brush off any loose dirt and then place the carrots/beets in boxes full of SLIGHTLY damp sand, alternating rows of carrots/beets with rows of sand.

Place the box in a cool place {shed or garage} and use them as needed.  If the carrots/beets are too wet, they will rot.  If they are too dry, they will split, harden and be mostly disgusting.  It’s a delicate balance that may take some trial and error.  Again, check them regularly for spoilage.

I hope that helps a little.  As always, I am sure you can learn a lot more from my readers than me, though, so how do you prepare your root crops for storage?  How do you store them?

~Mavis

The Backyard Homestead

Looking for a cool garden book to read this winter? Check out The Backyard Homestead: Produce all the food you need on just a quarter acre!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 10/9/2013 Garden Tally

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garden boxes

Is it just me, or does my garden look totally naked? Sheesh, all I did was pull up a few dying plants and tidy up the place and now the garden is almost bare. I don’t know whether to be happy this years harvest is nearly over, or if I should be motivated to get out there and plant more. We harvested just under 150 pounds of homegrown produce this week. Not as much as I was hoping for, but hey, 1,309 pounds of veggies isn’t too bad if you ask me.

Right now we have Swiss chard, kale, broccoli, fava beans, carrots, peas, leeks turnips and beets growing in the garden boxes. We also have lettuce, peas and tomatoes growing in the greenhouse.

I guess it really is time to pull out the grow lights and get planting if I want to have some fresh greens this winter.

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

fresh basil

Basil – 1 pound 3 ounces

We are currently out of fresh basil right now. Although we’ve enjoyed making fresh pesto and strawberry basil jam this summer.

beets

Beets – 133 pounds 12 ounces

We’ve still got plenty of beets in the garden, and I think I’m going to get some more started and see if I can grow this over winter. Have you ever grown beets in the winter?

organic gardening bok choy

Bok Choy – 7 pounds

We pulled up all the remaining bok choy a while back and tossed it to the chickens. I don’t think I’ll plant it again until next spring.

broccoli

Broccoli – 13 ounces

Our broccoli plants are doing great and I’m looking forward to a late fall harvest.

cabbages

Cabbage - 40 pounds 14 ounce

Still waiting to harvest our fall cabbage!

carrots

Carrots – 43 pounds 11 ounces

It seems like I’ve been pulling up carrots left and right these days. Having homegrown carrots on hand for lunch snacks and to use in soups and stews is awesome.

chives

Chives – 2 pound 5 ounces

We regular chives and garlic chives growing right now.

lemon cucumbers

Cucumbers 9 pound 6 ounces

Our cucumbers are done for the season. I guess this means I’ll be buying hothouse cucumbers at Costco until next summer.

chicken scraps

Egg Count – 2,139

Chickens are cool. You give them food, and they give you eggs. It’s like you are constantly bartering with them. ;) This past week we collected 62 eggs. And, I’m happy top report, none of our chickens are broody. Yee-Haw! It’s the first time in a looooong while.

elephant garlic bulb

Garlic 9 pounds 2 ounces

We just planted our garlic last week and it should be ready sometime in July of 2014. :)

garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes 11 ounces

We use them to make Garlic Scape Pesto.

green beans

Green Beans 17 pounds 11 ounces

Our green beans are officially done for the year. Now if I want some fresh green beans I’ll have to get them from the store. Booo!

curly kale

Kale – 41 pounds 2 ounces

I grow it for the chickens… :)

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 5 pounds 10 ounces

romaine lettuce

Lettuce – 37 pounds 3 ounces

We currently has lettuce growing in our greenhouse and we should start harvesting it this week. I’ll be starting more lettuce seeds indoors today and keep you up to date once they get growing.

microgreens

Microgreens 5 ounces

I need to jump back on the microgreen train. It’s been awhile since I’ve grown some bean sprouts.

blueberry jam with mint recipe

Mint 13 oz

I made some blueberry mint jam this summer and also harvested some mint for tea.

oregano container herb garden

Oregano - 1 pound 12 ounces

I been using fresh oregano for my heirloom tomato sauce.

onions

Onion – 37 pounds 8 ounces

While I was cleaning out the garden boxes over the weekend I found a few more onions growing beneath the tomato plants. We might have a few more out in the raspberry patch yet to harvest but I’m not sure.

basket of pears

Pears 47 pounds 7 ounces

Pear butter is AWESOME!

growing peas in a greenhosue

Peas – 42 pounds 9 ounces

We’ve got peas growing in the greenhouse and in a garden box.

potatoes

Potatoes - 299 pounds 11 ounces

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter.

Giddy Up! The potatoes just keep rolling in. All the garden beds have been cleared, now all that’s left is whatever potatoes are growing under the pumpkin plants.

french breakfast radishes

Radish - 22 pounds 2 ounces

bucket of raspberries

Raspberries – 21 pounds 7 ounces

Raspberry season is officially over in our backyard. :(

rhubarb

Rhubarb – 39 pounds 9 ounces

purple sage

Sage – 14 ounces

We are using sage as we need it.

pumpkins squash

Squash 108 pounds 1 ounces

The Girl had some peeps over last weekend and I sent them outside to harvest the pumpkins and squash we had growing up near the teepees and garden boxes. They ended up harvested nearly 60 pounds of squash. Not as much as I had hoped for, but there will be plenty for decorating and to eat.

fresh organic spinach

Spinach - 15 ounces

I planted more in the greenhouse for a winter harvest.

mung bean sprouts

Sprouts -2 pounds 15 ounces

Here are instructions for growing your own sprouts.

Strawberry and Nutella Crepes with Bananas

Strawberries 23 pounds 14 ounces

Strawberry season is over for the year.

Besides eating them fresh we made strawberry kiwi jam, strawberry freezer jam, strawberry pie, and homemade strawberry shortcake.

garden swiss chard

Swiss Chard 52 pounds 4 ounces

Out backyard chickens love it! :)

green zebra tomatoes

Tomatoes 233 pounds 9 ounces

We harvested a little over 18 pounds of tomatoes when we pulled up our tomatoes this past week, We still have a few growing in the greenhouse but for the most part, tomato season is over. :(

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

zucchini

Zucchini – 72 pounds 13 ounces

I harvested out last zucchini over the weekend. This was not a good zucchini year for us, which is really odd because they grow like crazy around here.

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 1309 pounds 12 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 2,139

If you are new to gardening or just want to learn more about organic gardening, my #1 favorite garden book is The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food By Tanya L.K. Denckla.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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