Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 37 of 52

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garden boxes

Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 37 of 52

old watering cans along fence

I recently pulled up the beans and discarded all but two of the zucchini plants we had growing along the fence. Last year I was able to grow oodles of zucchini and other squash, but this year, not so much. I’m not sure if it was the location, soil, or lack of hot weather this summer but I’m kind of disappointed we didn’t get more zucchini {I can’t believe I’m saying that!}.

raised garden beds

A few of the plants are starting turn yellow and die. Yep, fall is right around the corner.

bean tepees

On my to do list for today is picking pole beans. I’m not sure why one tepee is doing better than the other but I should have plenty of beans to harvest.

magnum glass greenhouse

Can you see the purple cabbage to the right of the greenhouse? I so want to pick one!! But they’re not ready. :(
potato towers

I think the potato towers are almost ready though. Maybe I’ll harvest them next week.
wooded backyard

A view of the backyard.
omlet chicken coop cube

Ye Olde Chicken Coop. The Girl and I are going to try and work on this area today. Ideally we would like to replace the bird netting with chicken wire and build up the garden beds around the chicken run. I don’t think we will get the whole thing done in one day, but hopefully we can make a dent.

pumpkin patch

The pumpkin patch. If you look closely you’ll notice a bunch of powdery mildew on the leaves. Which is a total bummer. We’ve had a lot of rain this summer and not a lot of hot weather and I think it has made a HUGE difference in our pumpkin crop this year.

raspberry patch

The raspberry patch. Yep, it still needs to be weeded.

raspberry bushes

And those containers still need to be moved and replanted too.

There is SO MUCH TO DO, and so little time to do it.

Please tell me I’m not the only one feeling a little overwhelmed with my garden right now.

~Mavis

national heirloom exposition ryan

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my online boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

Up for a tour? Read about our behind the scenes tour of Botanical Interests Seed Company.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Friday Night at the Movies – 13 Going On 30

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The Girl and I have enjoyed taking a little break from the documentaries lately in exchange for something a little more light-hearted.  So, tonight, we are watching 13 Going on 30.  If you haven’t seen it, I know it seems cheesy, but I recommend it.  It is such a cute show about a 13 year old girl who makes a wish on her 13th birthday to be grown up {kind of like the movie Big with Tom Hanks, only this one is for the ladies} and of course, gets her wish.  It’s a  really endearing movie about the awkward and funny aspects of growing up.

13 going on 30

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

National Heirloom Exposition

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National Heirloom Exposition Music Fly by Night

Yesterday I shared some pictures of heirloom squash from the exhibition hall at the National Heirloom Festival. So today I thought I’d post a few pictures of other stuff I thought was cool {and because you probably don’t want to see the other 442 pictures of squash I took}. ;)

National Heirloom Exposition

The Ye Old Dunk tank was pretty popular. Basically for a donation you could try and dunk the old man. All the proceeds went to support I-522. There was a line at this booth the entire time I was there.

treeline trailers

TreeLine Teardrop Trailers made camping look fun. I’m pretty sure Lucy and I would have a great time in one of these little pods. Clearly, not for folks who are claustrophobic.

National Heirloom Exposition

Okay, okay, my favorite part of the whole exposition were the tables lined with heirloom vegetables. This was the only reason I went to the expo. Yes, to look at vegetables. If that doesn’t write you a one way ticket to the crazy house, I don’t know what else wood.

tigger melon picture

Tigger melons. OH.MY.WORD. What a work of art. Waiting to see how each one would turn out would be like waiting to open presents on Christmas morning. I must try and grow these next year.

heirloom tomatoes

What do you think they do with all the heirloom tomatoes at the end of the exposition? I sure hope they get donated or something.

National Heirloom Exposition displays

You wouldn’t believe the amount of people taking photographs of the different varieties of kale. It was crazy. I guess there really are more than 5 people out there who like it. {Chickens not included}.

giant vegetables beets

Check out this enormous golden beet. It’s gorgeous. I wonder what the grower is using to fertilize his or her crops?

heirloom tomatoes for sale

Beautiful heirloom tomatoes for sale $4.19 a pound. I’d rather pay $4.19 a pound and treat myself to a real tomato than pay $0.99 a pound for those bland Romas they sell at the grocery stores for a buck a pound.

spinning wool

Spinning wool. This is on my bucket list.

long eared goat

What a pretty goat. Someday, when I live on a big farm, I want one of these guys. So cute!

st helena montessori school

And last but not least, The St. Helena Montessori School was there selling their extra produce. Not only do kids at the school grow the vegetables, but they take 6-week cooking courses too. Pretty awesome if you ask me.

Yep, the trip to the National Heirloom Exposition was totally worth it.

~Mavis

Have you been anywhere cool lately that made your heart sing?

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Growing Vegetables in a Greenhouse – Lettuce, Peas, Lemons and Tomatoes

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magnum glass greenhouse

Things are growing like crazy in the greenhouse, and with the weather heating up the past few days I’m having to water the fruits and vegetables twice a day now to keep them from dying.

raised bed herb garden

The herbs I moved out of containers and into the ground are doing really well despite the warm weather. I was a little worried I dug them up too early but the oregano, rosemary and chives are thriving in their new location.

unusual garden containers lettuce

Check out the 3-tired lettuce pot. Doesn’t it look cool? I think it’s only going to look better as time goes on. Harvesting lettuce this fall is going to be fun. {Or maybe I’m just a nerd}. ;)

growing peas in containers

The first round of peas we planted in the greenhouse are doing great and are just now beginning to climb up the upside down tomato cages. I’m predicting an early October sugar snap pea harvest.

green zebra tomatoes

We have green zebra tomatoes coming out of our ears!lemon tree fruit

Lemon the Meyer Lemon Tree is now down to just 7 lemons.
lemon tree shriveled up

I’m not sure what happened but one of the tiny lemons is turning yellow and has begun to shrivel up. :( Have you ever grown lemons before? Is it normal for a few to die off like this?

lemon buds

Luckily we have a few clusters of lemon flowers that are producing some new buds. I’m hopeful we’ll be able to get a few more.

I need to find some sort of organic lemon tree fertilizer to feed the tree with. Our Meyer lemon is still sitting in the same potting soil I planted it in way back in January. Any suggestions?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

National Heirloom Exposition – Heirloom Squash

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national heirloom exposition squash tower

Yesterday I went to the National Heirloom Exposition in Santa Rosa, California with my buddy El Presidente. We headed out super early and made a few side trips but the highlight of the day was the exposition, that’s for sure.

national heirloom exposition squash

I have seem pictures of the event in the past so there was one thing in particular I wanted to see in person. The heirloom squash. There were so many there, it was mind boggling.

national heirloom exposition black tutsu

Since this was an heirloom exposition, there were many more varieties available than your typical grocery store would carry. Which was totally awesome if you ask me. Look at this Black Futsu squash, ain’t she a beauty?

national heirloom exposition bumby

This black warty squash didn’t have a tag on it. Do you know what variety it is? I think I might want to try and grow a few next year.

national heirloom exposition grey russian

I like the muted color on this grey Russian squash. I need to find seeds for that one too. ;)
national heirloom exposition lady godiva

The Lady Godiva and Buen Gusto squash were pretty cool.
national heirloom exposition marrow geant

Clearly the Marrow Giant Squash could feed a family for a week. Holy cow this one was huge.
national heirloom exposition pitz turban

Pitz Turban Squash. Don’t they look like little acorns?

national heirloom exposition sacred indian rattle

This Sacred Indian Rattle gets bonus points for looking like a mini watermelon.

I may need to grow some of those next year too.

national heirloom exposition triamble

The Triamble or Shamrock squash is on my list for next year as well. I’m pretty sure the HH would even like this one. I’m not exactly sure how I would chop it up for soup though. Maybe I’d just grow a few to set out on the front porch.

national heirloom exposition tonda padana

Don’t you think the Tonda Pandana squash would sell well in a grocery store? I mean really, who would want an ordinary pumpkin sitting on their porch for Halloween when you would carve one of these beauties up for display.national heirloom exposition wrinkly

And last but not least, another identified warty squash. I’m not sure why I like the warty squash varieties so much but I do. They just seem to have so much personality compared to typical pumpkins.

So what do you think?

After seeing these heirloom squash, what would you rather grow? Heirlooms or regular field pumpkins?

Me? I stinking to the heirlooms.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – The Latest Harvest

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harvesting potatoes

Yesterday Lucy and I worked in the potato field {yet again} harvesting potatoes. Would you believe we still have two more rows to go? Holy cow man, will it ever end? ;)

big potato

I called our local food bank and asked if they’d be interested in some home grown potatoes and they said YES.

Sweet diggety, now I don’t have to spend all winter eating hundreds and hundreds of pounds of potatoes. Don’t get me wrong, we love potatoes, but I’m expecting to harvest around 700- 1,000 spuds and even my Irish husband can’t eat that many.

green tomatoes

We have a bunch of green zebra tomatoes too.
peppers and tomatoes

And check out these cute peppers. I think soft tacos will be on the menu this week.

mavis and lucy

I stopped to take a break on the potting bench and Lucy the trouble puggle dog decided to join me.

lucy

I’m not sure if all dogs like zucchini, but this one does.

tomato basketGardening in September is RAD!

How is YOUR garden doing?

I’m keeping my fingers crossed that  I’ll be able to continue to pick tomatoes through the beginning of October.

We’ll see.

~Mavis

 

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 36 of 52

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raised garden beds

Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 36 of 52

watering cans on fence

Even though the weather here in Western Washington has been a little wonky lately {rain one day, sunny skies the next} everything in the garden seems to be growing as it should. Every year about this time the zucchini and cucumbers start to fade out and the cool weather crops like lettuce and peas start to kick in. I love it!

pallet garden

It’s hard to see in this photo, but we replanted the pallet gardens with strawberry runners yesterday. When the beans in the upper left pallet and the lettuce in the far right pallets are all harvested, I think I’ll move the rest of our strawberry runners over there. For some strange reason, strawberries just seem to thrive in pallet gardens.

garden boxes

We had a heavy rain the other day and all the mulch shifted and made a funky pattern down the walkway. Now I’ll have to go out there with a rake and make it all pretty again because I have major OCD and every time I look at it I go crazy. ;)

bean tepee

Check out the bean tepees, aren’t they cool?

magnum glass greenhouse

We’ve got tomatoes, peas, lettuce, strawberries and Lemon the Lemon Tree growing inside the greenhouse. The cabbage patch that planted alongside the greenhouse is looking pretty good and we should be harvesting those purple beauties in about a month or so.
potato towers

I think I’m, going to give the potato towers a couple more weeks, or at least until all the leave die back and turn brown.

wooded backyard

A view from the back deck.

eglu omlet chicken coopOur pet chickens LOVE munching on the kale and Swiss chard we planted along the border of the chicken run. I plan on planting even more this fall so they’ll have plenty of fresh greens this winter.

pumpkin patchDo you notice anything unusual about this picture? I’m pretty sure pumpkin vines are suppose to sprawl out in every direction. But they’re not. For some strange reason there are no vines on the Handsome Husband’s beloved grass. Weird, huh?

raspberry patch

Ah the raspberry patch. I’m sure I’ll clean up this area one day.

Note to self- The wisteria has gone mad! Find the pruners and clip it before it takes down the garden gate.

raspberry patch

And last but not least, the former herb garden.

I moved the herbs out of their pots and planted them alongside the greenhouse. Now all that’s left to do is replant the pots with seeds and stick them in the greenhouse for winter.

So much work, so little time. ;)

~Mavis

curtis jones botanical interests

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my online boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

Up for a tour? Read about our behind the scenes tour of Botanical Interests Seed Company.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Pulling Up Chard and Planting Strawberry Runners

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strawberry runners

Lucy the Puggle Dog and I have been hard at work in the garden today pulling up strawberry runners and sprucing up the pallet gardens in the backyard.

pallet garden

So far this year we’ve grown lettuce, beans, strawberries, chard, zucchini, celery and spinach in the pallet garden. Lettuce has done the best.
swiss chard

The strawberry runners had overtaken one of the pallet gardens so we went ahead and pulled up all the Swiss chard for the chickens.

swiss chard

Originally I was planning on re-planting it alongside the chicken run, but once we got the chard down there the chickens saw it and started flipping out, so we just fed it to them.

Happy chickens lay happy eggs, right? ;)

strawberry runner

If you have never planted strawberry runners before, it’s supper easy. Just dig around the plant and gently pull it up. strawberry runner

Try and take a little of the soil it was grown in with you. When you replant the runner, make sure the soil is level with the strawberry crown {dark green part above the roots} and give it a quick drink of water.

pallet garden strawberriesIt’s been my experience that the runners will play dead for a week or two, then they’ll magically come back to life once the get settled into their new location.

Trust me, it won’t take long for the roots to take hold and grow. By next summer this pallet will be full of green leaves and fresh strawberries.

How about you? Are your strawberry beds a mess? Do you just pull up the runners and toss them, or create new beds for them for next year?

~Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – The Breakfast Club

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After The Girl and I watched Pretty in Pink last week, I casually mentioned that the movie was part of a whole group of “brat pack” movies from the 80′s.  The Girl asked me, “What’s the brat pack?”.  I stopped dead in my tracks.  Am I that old?  Have I failed my own child that I have never mentioned the brat pack before?  Could The Girl rat her hair if her life depended on it?

I really questioned all of the important stuff in life on this one people.  That’s why this Friday, we will once again be revisiting an iconic 80′s brat pack film.  It’s my duty as a mother to give The Girl culture, I take it very seriously.  That’s why we are going to watch The Breakfast Club.

Do you remember this one?  How long has it been since you watched it?  More importantly, which character did you identify with?  {Very deep question, I know, take your time.  Ha!}

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter

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How to Harvest and Store Potatoes for Winter

If you’re like me, and maybe, just maybe went a little overboard on planting potatoes this year {unless it’s the HH reading this, then I standby the fact that I planted the perfect amount, ha!}, then you might be wondering how to store them so that you can get the most out of your crop.

Digging up and storing potatoes is super easy–and if you do it right, you can almost ensure that you will have garden potatoes until March.

harvesting potatoes

If you planted potatoes traditionally {in the ground}, you can harvest them once the plant has started to die back.  It will begin to brown, and at this point, scale way back on your watering {that will help to harden off your potatoes}.  If it is dry where you live, you can leave the potatoes in the ground another week or two after the plant dies back to really harden off the potatoes, but if you are in a wet climate, it is best to get them out of the ground to prevent moldy rotten potatoes.  Dig them up using a shovel.

From the base of the plant, move out 8-12″.  Carefully dig around the plant.  Go slowly so that you don’t accidentally stab one of your taters with the shovel.  Gently turn over the dirt to reveal your potatoes.

red potatoes

Next, sort through the potatoes.  Move any that have broken skin into a separate pile to eat right away.

Move all of the rest to a cool dark place {basement, cellar, etc.}.  Using a box {with plenty of holes for circulation, but not enough to let light in} layer potatoes and newspaper.  First, line the bottom of the box with newspaper, then a flat layer of potatoes.  Cover the layer of potatoes with newspaper and repeat the process until you fill the box.  Tuck the sides of the newspaper in on each layer.

potatoes

If your potatoes are kept in a cool, DARK, dry place {roughly 45-55 degrees} they should last quite awhile this way.  Though, I guess I should mention, certain potatoes last longer than others, {i.e. russets last longer than yukon golds} so make sure you grew a variety that can be easily stored.  {Do not be tempted to keep them in the fridge, it causes the starch to turn to sugar and negatively affects the taste of the potatoes.}

red white blue new potatoes

Also, it is best to check your potatoes monthly.  If you find a rotten one, remove them from the box.

They are like a bad influence on the other potatoes and will quickly cause the rest of the box to rot.

That’s pretty much it.  How do you store your potatoes?  How long do you get them to store?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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