Seattle Tilth Harvest Fair September 7th, 2013

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Harvest FairHomePage2013_3

If you live in or near Seattle, I hope you know all about Seattle Tilth. Their mission is simple and one I can totally get behind: to inspire and educate people to safeguard our natural resources while building an equitable and sustainable local food system. I’ve been to their plant sales, their chicken coop tour and their educational classes and I’ve been blown away by every event. That’s why I’m pretty stoked about the upcoming Seattle Tilth Harvest Fair on September 7th, 2013.

The fair is supposed to be a fun, lively hands-on community festival with workshops, cooking demonstrations and fun activities for all ages. Head on down for a seed swap, cider pressing and DIY herb crowns. A crown of herbs? Awesomesauce! You can also check out the urban livestock area, demonstrations, book talks & signings, local band performances and raffles! Kids can make crafts in the children’s garden, see a puppet show and BE IN the parade at noon with a LIVE marching band!

Seattle Tilth’s Harvest Fair is FREE for everyone but they’ll be accepting donations at the door if you have a few extra dollars to spare.

Check out everything you ever wanted to know about the Seattle Tilth’s Harvest Fair HERE.

Get a full list of the activities and schedules HERE.

I’ll be there wearing my herb crown. Will you?

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



What Am I Suppose to Do With All These Potatoes?

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potatoes in wheelbarrow

Remember back in February when I bought 90 pounds of seed potatoes?

What was I thinking?

I mean really, did I not know what I was getting myself into? Well apparently not because yesterday Lucy the amazing puggle dog was outside helping me with the seemingly never ending task of digging up our potatoes.

mavis garden blog

And we’ve only just begun. Not including our latest harvest, we have already dug up over 210 pounds of spuds. Holy mashed potatoes people.

lucy the puggle dog

We still have potatoes growing in potato towers, beneath the pumpkin mounds and because we ran out of space, we even planted a few garden boxes with potatoes as well. red potatoes

And now I’ve found myself in a dilemma. What am I suppose to do with all these potatoes?

If you have a favorite recipe, please,please, please leave it in the comment section below.

Thanks a million,

Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Pallet Garden Photos – Lettuce, Strawberries, Beans and Chard

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pallet gardening lettuce

I went out to check the pallet garden yesterday and boy was I surprised at how well all the lettuce and bok choy are doing for this time of year. Normally the end of August/ Beginning of September is pretty warm here in the Pacific Northwest, but not this year.

I’m getting a sneaking suspicion that we are in for some cold and snowy winter. Which is fine by me. I’ll still be able to grow cold weather crops like carrots, beets and other root crops outside and lettuce in the greenhouse, but I’m not sure what I’ll plant in the unprotected pallet gardens yet.
pallet garden strawberries

Maybe strawberries. If you look HERE at what this pallet looked like back in April, you’ll see how much the strawberries have grown this year. It’s really pretty crazy how they spread out so quickly.

pallet garden beans

These are my calypso beans. I plan on drying these as soon as they dry up.

pallet garden swiss chard

Swiss chard. Ugg. I think when I re-plant my pallet garden I’ll move these down by the chicken run and plant them really close to the fence. The chickens LOVE Swiss chard {and kale} and it will give them something fun to do when they think I’m not looking.

pallet garden

Here is how the pallet garden looks right now. Do you think it’s too late to plant another crop of lettuce? Should I go for it, or save the lettuce seeds and just plant lettuce in the greenhouse instead? What do you think?

~Mavis

heat treated wood pallet

Want to learn more about wood pallet gardening and how I put mine together? Click on the pallets above and it will take you to my first pallet garden post of the year. You’ll also learn what to look for when choosing a pallet.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Square Foot Gardening – Giant Zucchini Alert!

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square foot garden

Lucy and I were out in the garden this morning so I snapped a few pictures of our square foot garden and holy cow is it overgrown or what? You can hardly see the square foot garden dividers.

giant zucchini

This is the giant zucchini we harvested. I’m not sure how we overlooked it when we were harvesting Swiss chard the other day {the Swiss chard bed is adjacent to the square foot garden} but somehow we did. Looks like a few {okay, 10} loaves of zucchini bread our in our future. ;)

cucumber

The cucumber plants are doing especially well in the square foot garden this year. Next year I’ll have to remember to put some sort of structure in the garden for them to climb on.

kale tree

Ahh the magical kale tree. It just keeps growing, and growing and growing.

kale stalk

Does anyone know how tall it will get? Do you think the kale plant could grow as tall as me?

I don’t know but I’m excited to find out.

strawberry runners

Strawberry runners. Do you have these all over your garden? I need to dig them up and move them pretty soon before they start to take over the entire garden.
lima beans

Okay, so I think this is a lima bean plant but I’m not sure. The leaves are so waxy I almost pulled up the plant because I thought it was a giant weed. Then I noticed the bean pods.

carrot seedlings

Carrot seedlings. I planted a big bed of carrots in another garden bed but I thought it would be fun to grow a few more in the square foot garden too. The carrots I grew here earlier this year did great, so why not plant them again?

roma beans

And last but not least, the Roma beans. Yep, it’s time to harvest.

How is your garden doing these days? Is it winding down or just picking up steam?

Mavis wants to know.

Thinking about putting together a Square foot garden? See the how I built a square foot garden grid HERE. All New Square Foot Gardening For more information, check out All New Square Foot Gardening.  It is an Amazon bestseller and the author, Mel Bartholomew is basically the king of square foot gardening.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 9/4/2013 Garden Tally

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mavis in the garden

This year I’m on a mission to grow 4,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables in my suburban backyard. In 2012 I was able to grow 2,028 pounds, and in 2013 I’m going double or nothing. I have absolutely no idea if I’ll be able to achieve my goal. But, as with any adventure, half the fun is getting there.   ~Mavis

*******

This past week we harvested just a little over 200 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables from our backyard garden. Wowie zowie that is a lot of food. I held a mini farmer’s market at the end of my driveway over the weekend, and we’ve been busy making batches of heirloom tomato sauce like crazy and thinking up ways to use the plethora of tomatoes that are still sitting on my kitchen counter.

I love this time of year!

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

recipe-strawberry-basil-jam1

Basil – 1 pound 3 ounces

I LOVE making fresh pesto and strawberry basil jam.

heirloom beets

Beets – 86 pounds 4 ounces

We still have plenty more beets to pull up but I’m waiting for them to get a little bigger first. Also, the beets we planted for this years Thanksgiving feast are doing well and look to be right on schedule.

bok choy leaves

Bok Choy – 4 oz

We have more Boy Choy growing in the pallet garden. I’ll try and get some pictures posted tomorrow to show you.

head of broccoli

Broccoli – 13 ounces

The fall broccoli we planted is looking healthy. The slugs have not discovered it yet {fingers crossed} so I am hopeful.

cabbage

Cabbage - 40 pounds 14 ounce

We are patiently waiting to harvest our purple cabbage!

baby carrots

Carrots – 5 pounds 6 ounces

We thinned our carrots the other day and brought a few large ones inside to snack on. Yum!

herb garden thyme

Chives – 1 pound 12 ounces

We thinned the chives and replanted our herb bed the other day. It always amazes me how we can have fresh chives year round.

burpless-cucumbers

Cucumbers 5 pound 2 ounces

We picked a few cukes over the weekend and have been making simple cucumber tomato salads with them.

fresh eggs blue and brown

Egg Count – 1,885

We collected 51 eggs this past week. The Hillbilly’s stopped by for fresh eggs on Saturday and I forgot to get a count of how many they took. Oops!

elephant garlic bulb

Garlic 9 pounds 2 ounces

Our garlic has been harvested for this year and I am using it in practically every dish now. :)

garlic scapes

Garlic Scapes 11 ounces

We used these to make Garlic Scape Pesto. Yumm!

bean poles

Green Beans 11 pounds 9 ounces

I noticed the beans on the tepee poles are about ready to be harvested. Hopefully this week.

kale

Kale – 20 pounds 14 ounces

Note to self: The neighbors LOVE kale.

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 5 pounds 10 ounces

lettuce

Lettuce – 36 pounds 9 ounces

We should be harvesting lettuce in about another week. Weeee!

microgreens

Microgreens 5 ounces

My favorite way to eat microgreens is with egg salad sandwiches.

blueberry jam with mint recipe

Mint 12 oz

I made some blueberry mint jam and also harvested some mint for tea.

oregano container herb garden

Oregano - 1 pound 5 ounces

I used a bunch this past week for my heirloom tomato sauce.

dry-store-onions-in-pantyhose

Onion – 17 pounds 6 ounces

All the cool people are storing onions in their pantyhose these days. ;)

basket of pears

Pears 47 pounds 7 ounces

We had a bumper crop this year.

garden peas

Peas – 42 pounds 9 ounces

Aren’t they beautiful? I think they’ll be ready to harvest in early October.

lucy and potato

Potatoes - 210 pounds 1 ounces

Lucy LOVES raw potatoes. What a nut!

radishes

Radish - 22 pounds 2 ounces

Radishes have been planted for fall.

raspberries in wooden baskets

Raspberries – 21 pounds 7 ounces

Raspberry season is officially over in our backyard. :(

rhubarb stalks

Rhubarb – 39 pounds 9 ounces

I harvested rhubarb 2 twice last week for my mini farmer’s market. So far this year we have made rhubarb vanilla jam, rhubarb walnut muffins, and strawberry rhubarb pies

purple sage

Sage – 14 ounces

fresh organic spinach

Spinach - 15 ounces

I’ll be planting more in the fall.

mung bean sprouts

Sprouts -2 pounds 15 ounces

I grew some sprouts this past week for my vegan neighbor Francisco.

Here are instructions for growing your own sprouts.

strawberry pancakes tasty

Strawberries 23 pounds 9 ounces

Besides eating them fresh, so far we have made strawberry kiwi jam, strawberry freezer jam, strawberry pie, and homemade strawberry shortcake.

garden swiss chard

Swiss Chard 25 pounds 6 ounces

Ugg. {But chickens and neighbors like it}.

tomatoes

Tomatoes 145 pounds 1 ounces

Tomato season has finally arrived and they are keeping me busy!

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

big zucchini

Zucchini – 23 pounds 6 ounces

As I’m sure you are well aware, unattended zucchinis can grow to the size of baseball bats pretty quickly. ;)

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 911 pounds 5 ounces  853 pounds 0 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 1,885

coops-ad-mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Creating a New Perennial Herb Garden

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thyme in a container

This weekend I finally got around to moving all those herbs I planted into containers this spring over to the greenhouse. Let me tell you Bob, I’m glad that little project is done. I don’t know what I was thinking when I dug up the old herb garden and moved everything in pots. Because the pots were tucked back behind the raspberry plants on the side of the house they barely got watered.

herb garden thyme

Now that they’ve been planted alongside the greenhouse, I’m sure they’ll be thriving again in not time at all.

puggle puppies Lucy

Did I mention Lucy helped too? Yep. She dug all the holes for me.

lucy the puggle dog

And a few extra ones too. ;)

lucy the puggle dog

I’ve decided to go ahead and plant both sides of the greenhouse beds with perennial herbs.

I’m thinking about trying fennel and lavender next year but I need a few more ideas.

Perennial Herb Garden

On the right side I have purple sage, thyme and chives.

Perennial Herb GardenAnd on the left I have oregano, rosemary and more chives.

Do you have any suggestions? I am in zone 8.

~ Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 35 of 52

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mavis garden blog

Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 34 of 52

potting bench

It’s a jungle out there I tell you, a jungle. ;) Check out the ornamental corn stalks. They are only suppose to get about 3 feet high and we already have a few tiny little ears growing. Pretty neat-o  if you ask me.

pallets

The lettuce seeds I planted a few weeks ago are finally starting to emerge and we should be picking fresh lettuce from our pallet gardens soon.

beans

Some of the plants are starting to spill over the garden beds, but I don’t mind. I’d much rather see them overflowing than bare that’s for sure.

bean poles

The bean tepees are looking pretty RAD if I do say so myself! :)

greenhouse

This past week I worked on clearing the beds alongside the greenhouse. I pulled up the potatoes and now all that’s left are a bunch of perennial chives. I think I might end up moving my potted herbs to the side beds. We’ll see.

cabbages

The cabbage patch.

caged potatoes

The potato towers are still hanging in there.

chickens

The chickens escaped last week and ate a bunch of my Swiss chard  and kale plants. Fine by me. ;)

pumpkins

Check it out! The soil is practically covered with green. Now all I have to do is wait for all those beautiful pumpkins to ripen and I’ll be in business!

herbs

I picked a few more stalks of rhubarb and harvested some sage leaves this past week but other than that, not much has been happening in the raspberry/herb area lately. Maybe this will be the year I get my act together and put in some proper posts in the raspberry patch. We shall see.

~Mavis

botanical interests seeds

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my online boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

Up for a tour? Read about our behind the scenes tour of Botanical Interests Seed Company.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Heirloom Vegetables For Sale

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heirloom vegetable stand

Yesterday morning I held an impromptu farmer’s market at the end of my driveway. It seemed like a quick and easy way to share the bounty with the neighbors without having to go door to door delivering produce.

tomatoes

There were heirloom tomatoes.

potatoes

Red, white and blue spuds.

kale

Rainbow Swiss chard and 3 kinds of kale.
garlic

Fresh garlic.

rhubarb stalksAnd rhubarb.

fresh veggies

I left $2.50 “seed money” in a jar on the table and a sign that read Fresh Vegetables, Pay or Leave what you like in exchange and then went into the house and did some chores.

heirloom tomatoes

After about 6 hours,we decided to pack it in. All that was left were a few potatoes and some tomatoes.

one hundred dollars a monthAnd this is what was left in exchange. $33 and some food products.

Pretty cool if you ask me.

Have you ever put anything at the end of your driveway?

If so, what.

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Store Garlic

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How to Store Garlic

Did you know you can get garlic to easily last for months?  I didn’t either until I stumbled onto this little trick:  put them in a regular paper bag with holes punched into them and paper clip them shut.  It gives them the dark dry environment they need to stay fresh, without limiting their air flow.

How to Store Onion and Garlic

Here’s what you need to get started:

  • Hole Punch
  • Paper Bags
  • Marker to Label the Bag
  • Paper Clips or Tape

Fold your paper bag in half length wise and punch holes in the bag {just makes the hole punching faster and more uniform}.  You don’t want to whole punch the bottom of the bag though, so stay away from the bottom three inches or so.  Open the bag back up and pop the garlic into the bag. Fold the top of the bag over and paper clip or tape it.  You can label the bags if you need to and reuse them over and over.

How to Store Garlic

I am totally going to start doing this–even if you don’t have a garden, you can use this method to stock up when prices are low.

How do YOU store your garlic?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Heirloom Tomato Harvest

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purple Cherokee heirloom tomato

Mama Mia! Check out this Cherokee Purple Tomato I found yesterday while I was picking tomatoes.

This gorgeous heirloom tomato weighed in at 1 pound 5 ounces. Not too shabby if you ask me. After I spotted the Cherokee Purple tomato I ran inside and made the HH come out and take a picture of me holding it. Ha! And yes, he thinks I am a total nut.

But I couldn’t help myself. Heirloom tomatoes are beautiful.

Here are a few other tomato pictures I snapped:

speckled Roman tomato

Speckled Roman Tomato. Have you tried growing these? Speckled Roman tomatoes are great for making sauce. {And they look cool} I love, love, love these!
green zebra tomato

Green Zebra Tomatoes. You know these are ripe when they start to turn a wee bit yellow. Green Zebra tomatoes are a little tangy, but oh so good.yellow pear tomatoes

Yellow Pear Tomatoes. I grow these every year for The Girl, and because they are great in salads and add a nice color to salsa recipes too.

Principe Borghese

Principe Borghese Tomatoes. Oh my word are these good. You totally need to add these to your seed wish list for next year. This is my first time growing these and I’ll be growing them next year for sure.

red zebra tomato

Red Zebra. These are great too!ace bush tomato

Ace bush tomatoes are an excellent slicer as well as great for sauce.

Italian Roma bush tomato

Italian Roma Bush Tomato. These are just like the ones you’d get at the grocery. Well, not exactly, these ones taste 180 million times better because they were homegrown. ;)

heirloom tomatoes

Here’s yesterday’s harvest. Pretty stinkin’ awesome if you ask me. Too bad we can’t grow vegetables like this year round in Western Washington.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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