Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 20 of 52

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organic gardening raised garden bed pictures

Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 20 of 52

growing peas along a fence

Yee-Haw! Now we’re farming!

See that bare patch of peas along the fence? Yep, Lucy the garden dog decided to have herself a little snack. Silly dog. If she would have only waited another month she could have had a much bigger snack.

Also, check out the wisteria growing on the arbor. The delicate purple flowers are just beginning to bloom. I’ll have to try and get a close up shot of them soon.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden

The wood pallet garden is looking great.

raised vegetable garden beds

All 16 of the raised garden boxes have now been planted. Now we wait. For tomatoes {it’s the reason we all garden, right?}.

bean teepees

The pea teepees and potatoes are rockin’.

greenhouse gardening magnum 10 x 14

Yesterday I started clearing out the greenhouse. Now that the weather has warmed up a bit, I’ll only be growing tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and strawberries in there. I’ll share some pictures of my set up when I’m finished.

Last year I had way to many plants growing in the greenhouse and it was really overcrowded, so this year I am going to scale back a week bit.

diy wood pallet compost pin potato towers

The potatoes are starting to poke through the potato towers. Yay!  Note to self: Must.Weed.Garden.

wooded backyard garden

View from the back deck.

omlet cube chicken coop plastic orange

Chicken coop, Swiss chard, fava beans and kale.

raspberry patch

Raspberry jungle.

cascadia raspberries

Here is the view of our raspberry patch from the kitchen window. No matter how hard I try to get the canes to behave, they never do and we end up with a raspberry forest.

container herb garden

And last but not least, the container herb garden. The sage looks like it might be ready to harvest this week. Weeeeee!

Well, that’s what’s growing in my backyard, what’s new in your garden?

Please tell me you’ve finally been able to plant something {I know a lot of you still had snow a few weeks ago}.

~Mavis

botanical interests coupon

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company.  You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Help! My Potatoes Plants Are Falling Over

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floppy potato plants

Zac from Berkeley, California was worried about his potato plants flopping over so I asked him to send in a picture. I thought maybe YOU and I could help him.

Here is what Zac had to say:

I have six 30 gallon plastic grow bags full of potato foliage and now flowers on some. After hilling them in as much as possible, I’m now staking the stakes to keep them upright.

This is the photo I took this morning.  Not all of them have been staked (yet).  But I’m on the alert if I have to do so. I’m figuring that they’ve reached their height potential now as flowering buds are starting to form on most.

I did some searching on the Internet and got mixed opinions about what’s going on with them. Some folks said not to worry about it since its the roots we care to eat. Others thought it would be best to prop them up to allow them to grow more!  I just began staking them after a few of the larger stems snapped off!

Cheers!

Zac

(Berkeley, CA)

Well Zac, I think your potato plants look great. But, I am worried your grow bags are not deep enough. If there was a way to set your grow bags in deeper ones, remove the old bags and add some more soil,  you might get a larger crop of spuds.  But otherwise I think you are right, your potatoes are nearing the end of their cycle.

Stay Green,

Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Cumin {Start to Finish}

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cumin flowerPhoto Credit

This will be my first year growing cumin and I’m pretty excited. I don’t know about you but I absolutely LOVE cooking with cumin. Yum Yum!

Brief description:  Cumin is an herb grown for the seeds.  It adds a unique flavor to Indian and Mexican dishes.

Where to Plant Cumin:  Plant in full sun in containers, garden beds or raised beds.

how to grow cumin seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/4″ deep.  When seedlings are 1″ tall, thin to 1 plant every 4″-6″.

Growing Tips:   Cumin requires a pretty long growing season, so if you live in an area with a short growing season, you will want to start them indoors.  Transplant outdoors when temperature LOWS reach 60 degrees.

How to Harvest:  Let seed pods ripen and turn brown. Remove the pods and let them dry.  Then, rub pods to remove the seeds. You can also cut entire stems and place them upside down in a bag to collect the seeds.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here is my Favorite Cumin recipe:

Chickpea Salad with Cumin and LimeChickpea Salad with Cumin and Lime

Fact:  Cumin is the second most popular spice in the world, next to black pepper.  It is essential to curries, and dates back as far as 4000 years.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Peas, Potatoes and Herbs

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garden gnomes sugar snap peas

According to the weather forecast the clouds are suppose to roll in tonight and bring us rain for the next 6 days. And you know what? I’m pretty happy about it.

Someone asked me the other day on facebook how I water my garden.

organic potatoes

I was totally embarrassed to say that I water my entire garden by hand. Yep, just me and my little hose and a super powered nozzle.

organic gardening oregano strawberries

When we first moved here, our backyard had a decent sized patch of grass and the rest of the yard was wooded. There was no need for a ton of sprinklers. Then, the summer of 2009 I decided I wanted to grow a huge garden, so we cleared a bunch of brush, and well, the rest is history.

organic gardening flat leaf parsley

Even though we’ve carved out more growing areas over the years, we never really stopped to think about putting some sort of slow drip watering system in. Mostly because of the energy {the handsome husband} and the cost it would take to install them.

Plus, when we go to put our house on the market someday, I seriously doubt the next family who moves here is going to want to 10 million sprinkler hoses and raised garden beds galore everywhere. Let’s face it, having a large garden is a lot of work, and most people are not going to want one this size.

grow organic herbs

So even though it sounds strange, I don’t actually mind hand watering my garden. I find it relaxing, and I can pull weeds out of the garden beds while I’m watering the plants too.

But when I have to water on a daily basis because the weather is in the 80′s for a whole week, well then it becomes sort of a chore.

organic gardening Herbs sage

So bring on the rain. I’m ready for a break!

~Mavis

P.S. How do YOU water your garden? Soaker hoses? Drip irrigation, a good old fashioned watering can? Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Gandhi

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Tonight The Girl and I are taking a step away from our standard food documentary to check out Gandhi.  The documentary is a biography of Gandhi’s life.  It attempts to re-enact his life, so it watches more like a movie than a documentary.

I remember watching this a long time ago and feeling moved by the man Gandhi was, so I am excited to watch it with my daughter to get her take on it.

gandhi

Amazon Prime Members can watch Gandhi for free.

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

 

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Information on Top Bar Bee Hives with Pictures

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top bar hives

Well, my friend Jane and her family have finally done it.

The got bees! After a long talk with the Handsome Husband about it, I’ve decided not to get bees. Mostly because I am a total afraid of getting stung and then there’s that whole part about me being allergic to them, so I’ll just have to get my bee fix vicariously through Jane.

Who knows, maybe she’ll even send me some of her Virginia honey for Christmas if I’m lucky {wink, wink}.

honey bee comb

So if you are interesting in getting some honey bees for yourself, head on over and check out her blog post Transferring Langstroth Nucs to Top Bar Hives. Jane and her family are documenting their bee keeping journey for all to see.

Buzz, Buzz.

Mavis

P.S. Do you dream of keeping bees too?

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Raised Garden Beds – Growing Cabbage, Garlic, Tomatoes and More

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DIY raised garden beds

The backyard is finally starting to look like a real backyard garden again. Out 16 4×8 raised garden boxes are really starting to fill in and it won’t be too long before they are overflowing with yummy vegetables to eat.

DIY Raised garden beds cabbage

I still think the cabbage and radish bed looks the best.

french breakfast radishes

Do you have any great radish recipes? Someone said they are good sauteed, like in a stir fry. We will have a bunch to harvest over the next 2 weeks and I need to find a few good recipes for them.

DIY Raised Garden Beds garden gnome

Radishes, onions and kohlrabi.

kohlrabi plant

If you look closely you can see the kohlrabi bulbs starting to form at the soil line.

square foot gardening

The square foot garden. We added 3 tomato plants to it a few days ago. Next on the list are beans and cucumbers.

DIY Raised Garden Bed Swiss Chard

Check out the bed of Swiss chard.

swiss chard plant

The chickens will be so excited!

how to grow garlic

I’m kind of surprised there are no signs of garlic scapes yet. I love using them in stir-fry dishes and it seems to me they should be popping up by now.

The year started off pretty mild but lately the weather has begun to really warm up for this time of year {I think so anyway}.  Since we didn’t get any snow this past winter, I think the vegetables might be a  little behind. Either that or I’m the one who is behind. I’m not sure which is which.

If there is one thing I have learned over the years about gardening is that it’s better to wait to until the weather warms up a bit to get all your seeds planted. Otherwise they just end up rotting in the ground because your’e to stinkin’ excited to start gardening and you plant them too early.

beet seedlings

Thinning the beets is on the agenda this weekend.

heirloom tomato plants

Be still my heart. Tomato plants.

organic gardening

Here is the view from the garden gate. Pretty neat-o if you ask me.

If you find that I am posting less than normal this weekend, it’s because I plan on spending most of it getting caught up in the garden. My online boyfriend Ryan from Botanical Interests is coming to visit me in a few weeks when he’s up here for the Mother Earth News Fair and I want to get everything looking in tip top shape for his arrival.

Peace Out Girl Scouts, Have a great weekend!

~ Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Container Gardening Idea – Grow Salad in a Pot

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Container Gardening Idea - Grow Salad in a Pot

Do you want to grow some vegetables but just don’t have a lot of space? Try container gardening. You can grow everything from tomatoes to salad mixes in pots of all shapes and sizes.

Trust me, anyone can have a garden and you don’t have to have a giant backyard to do it. If you have never gardened before, start with something easy, like salad greens.

How to Grow Salad in a Pot

Supplies

Directions

Fill a container with moist potting soil. Press seeds into soil and cover with 1/4 inch potting soil. Keep moist. Seeds should germinate in 5-10 days and depending on the variety and  your lettuce should be ready to harvest in 30 – 45 days.

You can do this!

~Mavis

If you would like to learn more about growing vegetable container gardens, check out The Vegetable Gardener’s Container Bible By Edward C. Smith.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden

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DIY Wood Pallet Gardening slugs

Oh no! Lucy and I noticed the baby slugs this morning when we went out to water the wood pallet garden. I know everyone has to eat, but come on! I’m not growing this lettuce for the slugs.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden lettuce

The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird informed me we are hosting a pasta feed for her team this weekend. Oh joy! In addition to pasta I will be serving salad. Fresh from the garden and the greenhouse. I hope the kids like it.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden strawberries

Strawberries usually ripen towards the end of June around here. We have strawberries growing in wood pallets, in greenhouse gutters and along side the house. By the looks of the berry blossoms everywhere we should get a bumper crop this year.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden celery

Lucy inspecting the celery.

Diy Wood Pallet Garden spinach

Spinach.

DIY Wood pallet garden bok choy

It appears the slugs got the the bok choy as well. I guess I’ll have to harvest it soon if I expect to get any.

DIY Wood Pallet Garden lettuce

And last but not least, the romaine lettuce. Come to mama! Doesn’t it look great. After I harvest the lettuce for the pasta feed {in the other pallet} I think I’ll plant some more romaine. For some strange reason romaine lettuce thrives in our pallet garden.

Have you tried pallet gardening yet?

~Mavis

heat treated wood pallet

Want to learn more about wood pallet gardening and how I put mine together? Click on the pallets above and it will take you to my first pallet garden post of the year. You’ll also learn what to look for when choosing a pallet.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Garden Photos and Drawings From the Netherlands

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gardening in the netherlands

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

garden potting bench

Aafke from the Netherlands {who blogs at xlovettes.blogspot.com} sent in some lovely photos of her bunnies and gardens. I had no idea there were teenagers out there who love to garden this much! Pretty cool if you ask me.

bunnies

Here is what Aafke had to say:

I love gardening and being in the nature. I have been gardening about 2/3 years now and have always helped my dad.

As you see I have two bunnies named: Muffin {orange} and Krummel {white with black}. Muffin an almost 2 years old female from a market and Krummel is a 10 months old neutered male from the shelter. I give them all their needs. Muffin lost a front leg last year. A polecat bit it off, but she can run as the best one!

cool garden sheds

And this is my little atelier. It is not finished yet but it’s going really fast. I made my atelier from an old pigeon loft. I pained it and bought some furniture in different thrift stores. I love putting things together and making one big sweetness of it. Next to my atelier is standing my kitchen garden.

raised garden beds herb garden

Left are standing strawberries and right herbs. I just planted some seeds so I have to wait for them to come up. Thyme, lemon balm, mint, chives, parsley, arugula and maggie. And the radishes have yet to come up. The ground is compost and works really good! In our compost we put, leaves, bunny poop and things, left over food etc.

espalier tree

I just want to let you see out pear tree. It’s doing so great! I already can’t wait to eat the first pear from the tree this summer! Do you have pear trees? We also have apple, walnut and hazelnut.

Schermafbeelding 2013-05-01 om 09.38.31

Hope you like the pictures.

I just want to say that I think that you have a great blog with lots of inspiring things.

Green hand shake,
Aafke

P.S. I don’t have any chickens, we had 5 but they are all ate by a polecat. Our wish is to have a few quails.

charocal bird drawing

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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