DIY Sedum and Succulent Living Wall Planter

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DIY Living wall sedum succulent planter

A while back Fab.com had the BrightGreen Living Wall Planter Kit on sale so I snagged one up. Ever since The Girl and I viewed the Desert Life Exhibit at the Gothenburg Botanical Gardens in Sweden last summer, I’ve been wanting to get a succulent garden started.

Grovert living wall planter frame

You can buy the whole kit and kaboodle on Amazon for a pretty penny, or you can also purchase the frame and mesh top separately and turn it in to a tabletop display as well. Either way, I think they are pretty cool.
living wall planter frame gro vert

The thing I like about the GroVert kit is there is a water tray at the base of the frame and a watering compartment {shown in my hand} at the top of the frame that gets hidden on the backside once the frame is planted.
grovert living wall planter frame DIY

Putting together the sedum and succulent living wall planter was really easy.

GroVert Living Wall Planter with Wooden Frame Kit

All I did was add about 1 cup of moistened potting soil to each cell, then drop the plant in.

sedum living wall planter frame container

Since there were 10 cells, I planted half with colorful succulents and the other half with sedums.

sedum and succulents living wall frame

The I went back and added little bits of sedum in the corners and any spaces that were bare.

DIY Living wall sedum succulent planter

Viola! Now all I need to do is have the HH hang the living wall planter up for me and then watch it grow.

Wahooo. Gardening is cool!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Growing Vegetables in a Greenhouse – Early April Pictures

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magnum glass greenhouse

The greenhouse is starting to fill up. The HH moved an additional table out to the greenhouse over the weekend and I’ve slowly been bringing out flats of plants I started under grow lights  and hardening them off before it’s time to plant them in the ground.

dogs in the garden

The tulips and chives are coming up nicely alongside the greenhouse.
glass greenhouse

In about another month or so this baby will be packed!

grow food in gutters

Spinach was planted in the top gutter followed by mesclun lettuce, Swiss chard and romaine lettuce in the bottom set of gutters.
spinach seedlings

Spinach seedlings.

grow strawberries in gutters

I know it’s hard to see but the strawberries I started in gutters are beginning to fill out nicely.

strawberry plants in gutters

Pretty soon flowers will be forming.

planting tables greenhouse

Our only 2 folding tables are filled with seedlings. I need to find another table!
greenhouse basil flats

BASIL! Wahoooo!  I’ll be thinning it and re-potting it soon.

tomato plants

The first round of tomato plants are in the greenhouse. These are my guinea pigs. If they don’t die I’ll set out the rest of them in the greenhouse house until it’s time to plant the tomatoes outside, around Mother’s Day here in the Northwest.
onion seedlings

Onions or leeks, I can’t remember at this point. Those need to get planted in the ground as well.

zinnia seedlings greenhouse

And last but not least, Zinnias. I’m excited about growing these this year.

Do YOU have a greenhouse?

Where are you starting your seeds this year? Inside, outside?

Mavis wants to know.

If you are looking for a greenhouse but don’t want to spend a ton of dough on one, I highly recommend the 5 foot Pop Up Flower House.  Before we had our greenhouse installed I used a smaller version of this and loved it. Plus, the reviews are great and you could even grow lettuce in the winter with this baby!

  • Quick and Easy Set up on Soil or Hard Surfaces in minutes
  • Protects your plants and extends your growing season.
  • Clear PVC material with UV protection for longer life.
  • Promotes and maintains high humidity levels to create a superior growing environment.
  • Open floor allows greenhouse to be setup over existing trees and bushes.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 14 of 52

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raised garden beds

Week 14 of 52 – Mavis’ Backyard Garden Plot

This past week was a gorgeous one here in the Pacific Northwest. Sunny skies and temps in the low 60′s made hanging out in the backyard lot’s of fun. As you can see the garden beds finally look like they have something planted in them and pretty soon it will look like a proper vegetable garden.

garden fence with flowers

The potting bench is a live with color and if you look closely at the first watering can that’s hanging on the fence, you’ll see some tulip leaves growing out of the top. I totally forgot I planted a few bulbs in there last fall.

raised garden beds planted with spring vegetables

So far in the raised garden beds we have broccoli, broccoli raab, cabbage, radish, beets, garlic, and carrots planted.

wood pallet garden

If you squint real hard you’ll be able to see the endive, romaine and another lettuces I planted in the wood pallets. I still have not decided what I’m going to plant in the other 3 wood pallets yet.

puggle puppy brown tan

I know it’s hard to believe, but when Lucy the puggle dog sees me pull out the camera, she strikes a pose. It’s the strangest thing ever. I’d say a photo shoot for Dog Fancy might be in her future.

wooden backyard garden bean teepees

Pea teepees and potato beds.

keeping pets out of the garden peas

Check out them peas! Wahoooo! Now, if I could just keep Lucy away from them.

back yard garden glass greenhouse

Artichokes, poppies, rhubarb and gladiolas.

magnum glass greenhouse

I was having a wee bit of a problem with Lucy “inspecting” all the seedling flats on the greenhouse floor so I had the Handsome Husband haul another folding table out to the greenhouse last night.

My plan for today is to get everything off the ground because ideally, I’d like little Miss Lucy to be able to walk in the greenhouse and hang out with me when I’m in there.

how to make potato towers gnomes

The potato towers  and the wood pallet compost bin have been installed and the gnomes have begun to take one of many stumps in our wooded backyard.

neon red bark wooden backyard garden

A view of barktopia.

omlet chicken coop eglu cube orange

Poor Lucy, the chickens are still not ready to be friends.

daffodils in garden

Future pumpkin patch.

raspberry patch

The raspberry patch is finally coming alive. I noticed a few bare patches and new growth popping up in the paths yesterday. Hopefully I’ll be able to get out there this week and transplant a few.

raspberry canes patch in spring

A view from the kitchen window.

herb container garden

And finally some progress on the container herb garden. Yee- Haw! We now have oregano, sage, rosemary and parsley planted. As soon as the thyme is ready to set out I will plant it.  I think I’ll keep the basil in the greenhouse again this year because it thrived in the hotter temperatures.

If I had to guess, this week is going to be crazy. The forecast looks awesome for the next four days. Wahooooo. Now we’re farming!

Peace Out Girl Scouts, have a great day and remember to have some fun.

~Mavis

free shipping botanical interests

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company.  You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

12 of the Deadliest Garden Plants

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12 of the Deadliest Garden Plants

A big thank you to Heather for forwarding me a link to the 12 deadliest garden plants. I had no idea these were so toxic to our furry little friends and wanted to be sure and pass on the information to everyone!

All of these our common place garden plants that can be poisonous to kids and/or pets:

  1. Rhododendron {the entire plant}
  2. Lily of the Valley {the entire plant}
  3. Hydrangea {the entire plant}
  4. Poet’s Narcissus {the entire plant}
  5. Foxglove {the entire plant}
  6. Larkspur {the entire plant}
  7. Oleander {the entire plant}
  8. Poinsettia {the sap found in the veins of the plant}
  9. Purple Nightshade {the entire plant}
  10. Mountain Laurel {leaves, twigs, flowers and pollen}
  11. Mistletoe {the entire plant, especially the berries}
  12. Water Hemlock/Spotted Parsley {the entire plant}

If you know of any other plants that are toxic, let me know in the comments below so we can all keep our pets and kiddos safe.

Thanks again Heather!

~Mavis


The New York Times 1000 Gardening Questions and Answers: Based on the New York Times Column Garden Q & A is awesome. I own it, and it’s pretty darn awesome.

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Mavis Garden Blog – Sedums, Daffodils, Lettuce, Swiss Chard and Parsley

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sedum plants and succulents

Yesterday I stopped by the Home Depot to use my $5 off $50 Garden Club purchase coupon that came in the mail {did you get one?}.

I was pleasantly surprised when I spotted flats of sedum plants for $12.99. I have a really cool project planned for these that I’m going to try and get done this weekend. I’llpost the pictures when I get it all put together.

daffodils blooming

The daffodils are blooming like crazy! I can’t pick them for bouquets fast enough.

botanical interests

I finally got around to planting 2 more gutters in the greenhouse. I started mesclun lettuce and a 3 round of Swiss chard. Once they get to be a few inches tall I’ll transplant them outside to the garden.

gardening in gutters swiss chard

When the lettuce and Swiss chard are moved to the garden I think I’ll transplant my basil starts in to the gutters and grow them there this summer. I grew basil in the greenhouse last year and it really did well, so why mess with a good thing, right?

parsley

I also planted some parsley starts in the herb garden as well. I’ll give a full garden tour tomorrow,  but I think it’s fun to show whats going on in the garden each step of the way.

What is happening at YOUR place? Has the snow melted yet?

Happy Saturday everyone!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Today’s Modern Food: It’s Not What You Think

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Part 1 of 2

Part 2 of 2

Tonight The Girl and I are going to watch a documentary I found on YouTube.com.  It looks like the whole documentary is available, so it’s a FREEBIE!  The film documents the contamination in our food supply–which could be a little scary, but knowledge is power, yada yada, so I am watching it anyway.

I have posted both parts here so you can watch it for free without having to search for it.

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Rustic Pea, Bean or Garden Trellis

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DIY how to make a pea bean trellis

I originally posted these photos of my rustic pea trellis last year but I thought I would share them with those of you who might have missed it and are looking for an inexpensive way to trellis you peas {or beans} this spring.

If you happen to live in an area where you can score some free sticks, you are in luck. Last spring we had a ton of saplings and dead branches that needed to be removed from the backyard.

We were able to re-purpose them and create a rustic pea trellis instead of just letting them decompose.

grid pea trellis

To make a rustic trellis, simply lay the branches down in a grid like pattern, and tie the sticks together at each crossing {I tied triple knots}.

sticks and twine

This is suppose to be rustic, so remember, it doesn’t need to be perfect. Quirky is good!

garden twine

I like to use Luster Leaf twine for my garden projects because it comes with a built-in twine cutter.

DIY pea bean garden trellis

Once you have all your knots tied carefully lift your trellis and move it into place.DIY how to make a pea bean trellis

Another great way to grow peas is to create a teepee. Either way, fresh peas rule, and once you get your peas planted, you’ll only be about 60 days away from a delicious harvest.

Grow Baby Grow!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Radish, Pea and Spinach Seedlings

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mavis butterfield garden

This morning I went outside while Lucy was napping and planted my second batch of radish seeds between my 12 cabbage plants.

radish seedlings

I planted my first batch of radish seeds about 2 weeks ago and this is what they looked like this morning. I’ll wait a few more days before they are all up before I start to thin the tiny little seedlings.

what do pea seedlings look like

The peas are also up as well. Colleen from facebook was worried she planted her peas too early because they were taking awhile to break through the soil. I told her not to worry, sometimes peas can take up to 2 weeks before they decide to wake up.

spinach seedlings

Also, the spinach in the greenhouse gutters is also starting to peek through the soil as well.

Starting seeds in early Spring can be torture when you have to wait for them to sprout. The cooler temps mean longer germination times, but hang in there, don’t worry, your seeds will grow.

Are you waiting for any particular seeds to break through the soil right now?

If so, what? I’m anxiously awaiting for those Toy Bok Choy seeds to pop up.

Now go out there and have some fun.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY – How to Build a Potato Tower

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DIY How to build a potato tower

Last year I built a few potato towers and had minimal success. But in hindsight, I think the lack of watering {and pretty much neglect  on my part was to blame}. So I decided to give the potato towers another try.

First let me say, I personally believe the best way to grow potatoes is in the ground in a traditional trench method.

But, what fun would having a garden be if we all didn’t experiment from time to time and try new techniques. Right?

how to build a potato tower DIY

After reading everyone’s comments, I decided to try growing this years potato towers 3 different ways.

how to potato tower DIY

I used a 4′ x 4′ piece of coated fence wire and bent the edges of the wire inward to secure the two ends together. I then pressed straw into the sides of each wire cage and added about 6 inches of dirt to the floor of the potato tower.

DIY how to build a potato tower straw

I then placed 5 seed potatoes on top of the dirt.

DIY How to build a potato tower

Potato Tower #1 - I covered the potatoes with 6 inches of dirt. My plan with tower #1 is to add additional dirt {but no more potatoes} as the potato leaves begin to pop through the soil.

Potato Tower #2 – I covered the potatoes with 6 inches of dirt, then added 5 more potatoes. I ended up doing this 3 times. Someone had suggested I try this method to see if it would grow more potatoes. I have no idea if it will or not, but I think it will be interesting to see what happens.

Potato Tower #3 – This tower was planted with alternating layers of potatoes, dirt, potatoes, straw, potatoes, dirt. Again, someone suggested this growing method because it had worked for them.

I guess we’ll all find out in about 80 days or so which method works better.

What do you think?

Have you ever tried growing potatoes in towers before? Did it work out for you? What method did you use?

~Mavis

Follow the progress of the potato towers below.

The Complete Book of Potatoes: What Every Grower and Gardener Needs to Know

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 3/27/2013 Garden Tally

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{June 2012}

This year I’m on a mission to grow 4,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables in my suburban backyard. In 2012 I was able to grow 2,028 pounds, and in 2013 I’m going double or nothing. I have absolutely no idea if I’ll be able to achieve my goal. But, as with any adventure, half the fun is getting there.   ~Mavis

See that picture above? The photo was take on June 28th, 2012 on one of our backyard garden tours. It’s hard to believe that my garden will look like that in about 3 months. Holy cow. Growing your own food is awesome, isn’t it?

Although we spent a lot of time in the garden this past week, the only thing I harvested was a handful of chives and some sprouts. So far we have lettuce, broccoli, broccoli raab, cabbage, carrots, radishes and garlic in the ground. Strawberries, spinach and more lettuce is growing in the greenhouse gutters as well.

If you have not planted yours yet and you’d like to know how, you can find directions in the Growing Guides section on the blog.

I’m not sure what the weather is like in your neck of the woods, but as soon as you can break ground and plant something, Go For It!

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

how-to-can-pickled-beets_opt{Pickled heirloom beets}

Beets - 14 ounces

rainbow-carrots{Last summers giant carrot harvest donated to the Tacoma Mission}

Carrots – 3 ounces

grow your own chives

Chives – 1 ounce

egg-count-2013

Egg Count – 481 {5.6 eggs per day average}

This week we collected a whopping 79 eggs. OH MY WORD! We shared with Girly Girl and Mrs. Hillbilly and ate a lot of scrambled eggs this past week. I appears all the hens that are capable of laying eggs are laying now.

If you are wondering what we do with the hens that don’t lay very often {Black Fatty is one of them} we keep them of course. Just because they can’t lay, doesn’t mean we ship them off. Chickens are cool pets, and growing your own eggs is pretty awesome too.

microgreens
Lettuce
– 6 ounces
Microgreens 5 ounces

grow-potatoes-in-your-backyard-russet-red

Potatoes – 2 pounds 9 ounces

grow your own sprouts

Sprouts - 8 ounces

Rainbow-Swiss-Chard-picture

Swiss Chard 11 ounces

cut-wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 6 pounds 3 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 481

Get out there and grow!

~Mavis

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Need some seeds? Botanical Interests is offering FREE SHIPPING on orders over $50 right now.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Recipes Garden Frugal Canning Chickens Travel