How to Grow Microgreens {Start to Finish}

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

botanical interests micro greens seeds

This morning I planted a flat of micro greens under grow lights in the office. I’ve grown Micro greens in the past and the thing I LOVE about them is that they can be harvested in as little as 10 days. Pretty stinkin’ awesome if you ask me. How’s that for a little instant gratification?

If you are surrounded by snow, or it’s too chilly to grow anything outside right now, try some micro greens. They’re easy to grow. I promise!

Brief description: Micro greens are the tiny form of edible veggies and herbs.  They can be added to salads, sandwiches, and used as a garnish.  They are très chic right now in upscale restaurants.

Where to Plant Micro greens:  Micro greens can be grown indoors in containers all year long.  For a continual crop, you can sow them every 2 weeks.

micro greens seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/8″ deep, with 1/4″ to 1/2″ spacing.  Thinning is not necessary.  Plant seeds into large shallow containers.  They like a lot of light, so place in a sunny location or use a grow light.

microgreens{photo credit}

Growing Tips:  Micro greens pretty much grow themselves–keep the soil consistently moist, but not soggy.

How to Harvest:  Plants should emerge in 2-5 days, they are ready to harvest when they are 1″-2″ tall and leaves have unfolded.  Pick at the base of the plant, close to the dirt, wash thoroughly  and eat fairly immediately.

Here is a cool Micro Greens recipe to try:

baby greens with roasted beets and potatoesBaby Greens with Roasted Beets and Potatoes 

Micro greens are not the same as thing as sprouting.  Micro greens are harvested above the soil and grown in dirt.  Sprouts are grown entirely in water and the entire plant is consumed, including the seed, root, and under-developed plant. Learn more about how to grow sprouts HERE.

Looking to buy some Micro Greens? I’m growing the Savory Micro Greens Mix from Botanical Interests. You can find the seeds HERE.

microgreens book how to grow

Want to learn more about microgreens? Check out the book Microgreens: A Guide To Growing Nutrient-Packed Greens. It’s awesome!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Giveaway: 3 Readers Each Win The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

The gardener's guide

One of the questions I get asked all the time is Mavis, what is your favorite gardening book? So today I thought I offer a giveaway for 3 copies of my all time favorite gardening book: The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Foodby Tanya L.K. Denckla. I was given this book a few years ago at Christmas time and have been using it every year since.

The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food is packed with 6 big chapters covering everything from vegetables, fruits and nuts, herbs, organic remedies, and allies and companions. The book is easy to read, and there are tons and tons of organic remedies included to prevent or help control plant diseases and garden pests

In a nut shell, this book rules, and I love it.

All you have to do to enter this giveaway is leave a comment below and let us know: What’s your favorite day of the week and why?

Rules

1 entry per person/ip address. If you cheat, you will totally be disqualified.

This giveaway ends Sunday, February 10th, 2013 @9 pm PST and the winners will be announced in the February 11th, 2013 edition of Mornings with Mavis.  You will be notified via email and have 48 hours to claim your prize. If you do not claim your prize within 48 hours the books will be donated to my local library.

Good Luck!  I hope you win!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Repotting Artichoke Seedlings

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

artichoke seedlings 1 month 4 weeks

This morning I re-potted my artichoke seedlings I started on January 4th. I tried direct sowing some artichoke seeds late last summer, and they were off to a good start until the chickens gobbled them up. Bad chickens.

I have high hopes for this batch though, and if all goes as planned, I’ll have an entire 8×4 raised garden bed full of gorgeous artichoke plants by the end of the summer.

1 month 4 weeks artichoke seedling

If you have never transplanted seedlings from a flat to individual pots before, here is how I do it.

For starters, I try and re-pot the seedlings once they have a couple true leaves {which is actually their second set of leaves, not the first set that emerge from the soil}.

When re-potting your seedlings try and avoid touching the roots as much as possible to avoid stressing them out too much.

how to transplant seedlings potting soil
Place a bit {about an inch or two} of potting soil in the bottom of the new container, place the seedling in and and enough potting soil to cover the roots. Press the soil gently around the plant to hold it in place.

artichoke plant seedling 1 month

Give the plant a drink.

artichoke seedling picture

Even though these artichoke plants were ready to move to a larger container, they are not ready to be transplanted outside until after the last spring frost date {around April 15th in Western Washington}. Since I am going to be running out of space soon in the office, I plan on purchasing a small heater for the greenhouse this week so I can slowly start to move my seedlings out to the greenhouse one at a time.

artichoke seedlings

When I’m ready to move my starts out to the greenhouse, I’ll start with leaving them out in the heated greenhouse for an hour the first day, then two hours the next day, and then a few more then a few hours, until they are ready to reside in the greenhouse until mid-april when I’ll be able to plant them in the raised garden beds. It’s a process for sure, but a fun one at that.

Has the garden bug hit you yet? Got any dirt under those fingernails?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Rocks, Rocks and More Rocks

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

mavis butterfield

Today I hauled rocks, rocks, and more rocks. And I’m still not done.

rock border

Moving rocks from one side of the yard to the other isn’t exactly fun, but at least I’m getting my exercise in. Which is probably a good thing because the Tacoma City Marathon I signed up for is in exactly 90 days.

Do you think gardening counts as cross training? I think it should. Especially since I have been seriously slacking off in the “walk/jog/run” part of my training program. If I at least have the cross training {gardening} part covered, I should be fine. Right?

mavis butterfield

Oh well.  I’ll still have another 75 feet of cross training shoveling dirt and moving rocks to go. And then I’ll be done. Yep, then I’ll have time to get some exercise in. Unless of course I find something else to do in the backyard.

rock border mavis

What did you do today?Exercise? Shovel snow? Watch the game? Party like a rock star? Do tell, because I bet it was more exciting than moving rocks.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Endive {Start to Finish}

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

endive seed packet

This morning I planted a flat of endive. It was the first time I have ever planted it and I’m pretty excited. I’m not sure what I’m looking forward to more, it’s funny leaves or to actually eat it. All I know it that it looks cool, and therefore probably tastes cool too.

endive seed

Brief description: Endive is a leafy green that classes up any salad.  It also dresses up flower beds and gardens, as it is considered an ornamental edible, as well.

Where to Plant Endive:  Plant in cool weather {early spring or late fall}  in containers, beds, or raised beds.

endive{photo credit}

Planting Seeds:  Start indoors 10-12 weeks before last frost and transplant outdoors 4-6 weeks after starting.  Plant seeds about 1/4″ deep and thin to 1 plant per seed pot when plants reach about 1″.

Growing Tips:  Care for endive much as you would lettuce.  It does not need a particularly fertile soil to thrive and it tends to like cooler climates.

How to Harvest:  Plants are ready to harvest when they reach about 10″-15″ tall.  The entire plant can be harvested, leaving only the base.  Tear off with your hands at the base of the plant.

Endive Recipes to Try:

endive saladMixed Greens with Mustard Dressing – Bon Appetit

Fun Fact:  Endive is a cool weather plant, and its taste actually improves after exposure to a frost.

Have you ever had endive before? What did you think?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 6 of 52

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

raised garden beds

Week 6 of 52 – Mavis’ Backyard Garden Plot

Things are moving right along in the garden. I am finally starting to see a dent in the rock border {left side of the picture} and think I’ll be done moving the rocks I need for my last rock border pretty soon. When I’m finished, I’ll have Monkey Boy move the rest of the rocks to the front yard for me.

rock garden

It’s official, I have decided to plant sunflowers and zucchini along the fence. I’m hoping the sunflowers will attract some bees, but I’m not exactly sure how I am going to keep the birds away from pecking at the seeds. Any ideas?

bean teepee

I haven’t decided if I’m going to move the bean tepees yet. I really like them, but I want to do something else with the area. I’m not sure where I would move them though.

garden bed logs

This log garden looks a little shabby right now, but I have BIG plans for this space. It’s going to be awesome!

garden pictures

I still have not figured out what I am going to do here, maybe flowers?

magnum glass greenhouse

I’ve had the doors of the greenhouse open for the last few days to air it out, and once I scrub the roof panels and breathable fabric flooring, I’m hoping to move some flower and vegetable starts out there pretty soon because I’m running out of space in the office for my plants.

wood stump

This area behind the greenhouse is VERY shaded and I’m not sure what I’m going to grow. Maybe some greens?

backyard garden

Burn baby burn! The backyard garden area is starting to take shape. We still have about 7 stumps to burn, but I think this area is going to be pretty darn awesome once we get it prepped for growing vegetables.

omlet chicken coop eglu cube

This is the latest rock border I’m working on. I’ll post some more pictures of it in a little bit.

cascadia raspberry canes

I had thought about moving the raspberry patch, but in the end decided to leave it where it was. We need to reset the posts at the end of the rows and prune the canes.
raspberry patch

This year instead of dedicating an entire garden box to a herb garden, I’ve decided to plant chives along the sides of the greenhouse and grow mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and a few other herbs in containers. I’ve never really grown herbs in containers before, have you? Any advise?

Alright, that’s about it. How are YOUR garden plans coming along?

~Mavis

098

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company.  You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE, or visit my {online} boyfriend Ryan’s blog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Mail – Becky From New York Sends in Her Backyard Garden Photos

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

raised garden beds bean trellis

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. It is so much fun to see all the different garden set-ups and chicken coops people are using. Just seeing your pictures gives me plenty of ideas I would like to incorporate into my garden this year.

Keep them coming!

Here is what Becky from New York had to say about her backyard garden photos that were taken last summer:

green bean vines

I have been gardening for about 35 years, yes I know hard to believe since I am so young, lol.

I have gotten into the easy no work raise beds and even got my hubby on board. I did put a farm cattle gate up for my pole beans and it worked good, heaver than fencing. I just drilled holes in it and put in screws and bowed it over and did the same on the other side. I plan on putting one on the other side this year.

raised garden bed garden

My friend and I are gardening together this year, she will grow vine plants and I will grow the rest and when they are ready we plan on getting together and dry or can or freeze them.

raised garden beds gardening

She doesn’t have as much space as I have. I am also a “newbie” chicken farmer as I have 8 this year and they are all laying, I put rope Christmas lights up and a space heater for the really cold upstate New York nights like the -15 we just had.

homegrown produce

I am the go to person around here for gardening, If I don’t know I will read and learn about it.

fresh canned corn home canning

Awesome pictures Becky! I am totally going to make a bean trellis now after seeing your photos.

Keep on digging,

~Mavis

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Craft made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – The Fire Ban Has Been Lifted!

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

fire

I checked the fire department’s website this morning and the fire ban had been lifted. You know what this means right? I can finally get started on burning all those stumps that are sitting in the way of my new vegetable garden.

fire red boots mavis

I didn’t want to light the whole backyard on fire all at once, but it would be really, really nice to get this project wrapped up by the end of this weekend so I don’t have to smoke up the neighborhood all spring.

I lit 2 stumps on fire today, and there are still about 12 left to go. Hopefully, if the weather stays nice, I should be able to get this project marked off my list in about 48 hours. Fingers crossed.

landscape fabric

I know you are going to think I’m totally crazy, but another one of my major projects is to lay landscape fabric all over the newly weeded backyard. When it comes to weeds, I have major OCD. I’d much rather buy a 5 rolls of landscape fabric, and haul a truckload of dirt in than have to deal with weeds all year round.

I’ve been using landscape fabric for about 5 years now, and let me tell you Bob, forget Snapple, landscape fabric is the best stuff on earth.

landscape fabric

But first, I have to get rid of the rest of the stumps. And then it’s party time!

How about you? What are your plans for the weekend?

~Mavis

 

 

 

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Tomatoes {Start to Finish}

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It


heirloom tomatoes picture

This morning I woke up at 4 am to plant my tomato seeds. Yes, I am a total weirdo. But that’s okay, because I’ve been planting tomato seeds on February 1st ever since I can remember. Just not a 4 am. I just couldn’t sleep last night thinking about them.

There has been only 1 year I didn’t get my tomatoes seeds planted early, and that was last year. I waited until March 1st, and totally regretted it. Partly because by the time I was ready to transplant the tomato plants to the garden they were not as large as I had wanted them, and also because The Girl and I went on a last minute vacation and the Handsome Husband killed off quite a few of my plants. It was too late in the season to re-plant, and I was stuck buying other peoples tomato plants at Farmers Markets and various sales around town. I was not happy.

Late Spring can be unpredictable here in the Pacific Northwest, but I typically like to start hardening off my tomato plants around the second week in April. Luckily, this year I have a greenhouse so I can move them out of the house and behind glass walls before the tomato plants take over the inside of our home.

If you don’t have the space, or the option of moving tomato plants outside to a protected area, you may want to wait a few weeks before you plant your tomato seeds.

tomato seedsGo HERE for the list of tomato seeds I’m growing this year

Brief description:  Vegetable or fruit?  While tomato is technically a fruit, many still consider it a veggie in the culinary world.

Where to Plant Tomato:    Tomatoes {depending on the variety} can be planted in raised beds, garden beds, hanging baskets, and containers. I will pretty much plant them anywhere that has good soil. Because really, is it possible to have too many tomato plants? I think not.

jiffy peat pots greenhouse

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds about 1/8″ deep.  You can plant 2 -3 seeds in each pot and thin out to one when they are about 2″ tall.  Tomatoes need quite a bit of light to start, so make sure to place starts in a sunny location or use a grow light.  After 8 weeks, tomatoes should be ready to transplant outside {if the weather has warmed up a bit}.  Make sure to ‘harden off’ your plants, by introducing them to the outdoors gradually.  Leave them out during the day and bring them in at night for the first week or so.  Space about 24″ apart when transplanting.

tomato plants

Growing Tips:  Trim leaves up at the base of the plant and be careful not to let dirt splash up onto your tomato plants when you water–this will prevent a lot a fungus problems.  Also, water regularly and deeply.

pruning tomatoes

How to Harvest:  Harvest tomatoes when they are firm and bright orange to red {they may still have a little yellow around the stem}.  Pluck fruit off the vine with your fingers.

My Favorite Tomato recipes:

easy salsa recipe heirloom tomato salsaRainbow Salsa

crock pot pizza sauce homemade  recipeHomemade Pizza Sauce

Easy Salad Recipes - Heirloom Tomato, Corn, and Avocado SaladHeirloom Tomato, Corn and Avocado Salad

Storage Tip:  Never store tomatoes in the fridge.  They lose their nutritional value and their flavor.  Try to store right around 55 degrees.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Front Porch Flowers

  • Like on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Pin It

pink cyclamen

I went to my favorite crack house today. The Home Depot. They had just received a giant shipment of cyclamen plants and I was able to pick from the cream of the crop. Sweet diggety! This hot pink one caught my eye and before I knew it I was rushing home to plant it.

Cyclamen leaves

I don’t know about you, but this time of year is absolute torture for me. Any sign of color {other than green} Freaks.Me.Out. Just being surrounded by a teensy bit of color is like seeing the light at the end of this dark, grey, tunnel called winter.

front porch flower pots

Spring is almost here people.

daffodil bulbs in terra cotta pot

Can you believe it?

~Mavis

P.S. The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird said I should not use the term “crack house.” But c’mon people. We all have our weaknesses, and The Home Depot is mine.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Recipes Garden Frugal Canning Chickens Travel