Is Having a Garden in the Front Yard Illegal?

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Ever wonder what it would be like to dig up your entire front lawn and plant an edible garden instead? Check out this video of  Josée Landry and Michel Beauchamp’s beautiful 2012 front yard kitchen garden in Drummondville, Quebec.

front yard garden{photo credit}

There was actually a big controversy over the garden and the city had planned to make all front lawn vegetable gardens illegal. You can read the whole article about illegal front yard gardens from the Huffington Post. Talk about crazy!

What do you think? Is this an eyesore or eye candy?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 12 of 52

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raised garden beds

Week 12 of 52 – Mavis’ Backyard Garden Plot

Although it rained quite a bit past week,  I was still able to get a few projects done. We planted a boatload of new seeds as well as cleaned up the backyard and moved some more pots out of the garage.

potting bench

The spring bulbs are beginning to pop up everywhere so I’ll have to have The Girl go out and pick a big bouquet of daffodils for the kitchen table later today to bring a little color in to the house.

raised garden beds

I know the raised garden beds don’t look too exciting right now, but in another month or so you’ll be able to see lots of green. I think waiting for seeds to germinate in the spring is one of the hardest parts about gardening.

recycled wood pallet garden

Endive was planted in the back left wood pallet and so far so good. Lucy, the squirrels and the slugs have all left it alone. If you are thinking about creating a pallet garden, be sure and check out this Pallet Gardening 101 post to help get you started.

bean teepees

See that box out there? It’s full of potatoes. Hopefully I can get the rest of the 90 pounds of potatoes planted later today. Fingers crossed.

wooded backyard

Future perennial flower garden.

poppy foliage

See the green at the base of the tree? Those are the poppies I planted last year. I’ll be planting more poppy seeds this year and we also have artichokes and rhubarb in this area as well. The rhubarb shoots have just begun to pop through the soil. I placed wire tomato cages near them so I’d remember not to plant anything to close to them.

magnum glass greenhouse

The greenhouse. Hopefully I can write more about what’s going on in there later this week.

wood pallet compost bin

The potato towers are on my list of “things to get planted” today.

daffodils planted in a natural setting

Remember all those bulbs I planted last fall? I can wait for this area to bloom.

wooded backyard garden

I still need to carve out another large garden plot towards the left.

omlet eglu cube

Happy chickens.

garden path

Lucy the crazy puggle dog running all over my newly planted kale plants.

suburban backyard garden

Future pumpkin patch.

raspberry patch

Raspberry and blueberry patch {the blueberries are planted just behind the raspberry canes towards the left}.

backyard garden

And last but no least, the future herb garden. We are planning on dragging out a few more large pots to this area pretty soon and filling then with herb starts.

I need more time people, more time!

Well, it looks like it might be a pretty decent day outside today, so I better get dressed and get out there.

Have a wonderful day,

~Mavis

free shipping botanical interests

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company.  You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

1 Year Subscription to Urban Farm Magazine Only $4.99!

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It’s Baaaaack!

DiscountMagsis having a St. Patrick’s Day sale with 36 magazine starting at $4.99 for a 1 year subscription. My favorite deal is Urban Farm Magazine for only $4.99 a year. I love this magazine! Learn how to grow you own food in the space you have!

Urban Farm Magazine is guide for those in cities or suburbs looking to become more self-sufficient by growing some of their own food and treading lightly on the environment in the space they have. Articles include how-to projects, gardening basics, composting, beekeeping, roof-top gardening, preserving and freezing, and time and money-saving ideas.

Go HERE to order Urban Farm Magazine.

*This special rate will be live through midnight 3/17/2013 (EST). You can purchase this deal as a new subscription or to renew your existing subscription. You can also purchase additional subscriptions as gifts! This is such a wonderful magazine at an amazing price.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Radishes {Start to Finish}

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radish seeds botanical interests

This morning Lucy and I went out to the garden and planted 5 different kinds of radishes. Last year was my first year growing the French Breakfast Radish and it was so good, I decided to expand my radish crop this year and plant some unusual varieties.

Here are the 5 different kinds of radishes I am planting this year:

If you have never grown radishes before, I promise you, they are super easy to grow.

what do radish seeds look like

Brief description:  Radishes are a quick-growing hardy vegetable with a crisp mild flavor.

Where to Plant Radish:  Radishes can be planted in raised beds, garden beds and containers.

how to plant radish seeds

Planting Seeds:  Sow seeds 1/2″ deep.  When foliage appears, thin to 1″ apart.  Radishes are best planted with cucumbers, spinach and squash to repel as they repel unwanted insects.

french breakfast radish

Growing Tips:  Radishes prefer cooler weather.  You can sow them outside 4-6 weeks before the last frost, and sow more every 5-10 days for a continuous crop.  You can sow them again in the late summer for a fall crop.  Water regularly.

Crimson Radish picture

How to Harvest:  Harvest radishes when they are small {1-1/2 to 2″}.  If you let them get much larger, they start to split and taste a wee bit tough.

Radishes’ Literary Debut:  In the novel, Gone with the Wind, it was a radish that starving Scarlett O’Hara eats {the only food she can get}, and then declares, “As God is my witness, I’ll never be hungry again.”

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Planting Swiss Chard and Hostas

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puggle puppy tan

Lucy and I worked in the garden this morning spiffing up the walkway outside of the chicken coop. As you can see she is a big help. It’s pretty much 3 steps forward, 2 steps back when any sort of planting goes on, but she loves being outside, and I love having her out there.

swiss chard

I pulled up all of the Swiss chard that over wintered in the garden boxes and brought it around back to plant. My goal is to fill the garden area in front of the chicken coop / run with oodles and oodles of kale and Swiss chard for the hens to snack on all summer.

young kale plant

The kale and Swiss chard transplants that I set out last week are holding up great despite the rain and chilly temps.

minuteman hosta

While I was at the Home Depot yesterday picking up supplies for my latest project {just wait until you see it, it is going to be SO COOL}, I wandered over to the nursery section and spotted a table full of hosta plants.

I’m not really into variegated plants, and I had already placed some solid green hostas in my cart, but each time I would pass by the green and white hostas, they would state at me. Like they were giving me the evil eye or something.

It was eerie.

I’m not really sure what my issue with variegated plants is {to much color on one leaf?} but in the end I finally broke down and bought the more colorful hostas  instead.

I still can’t believe I put the solid green leafed hostas back. They were so pretty. So uniform, and so perfect looking.

garden path

So now I have neon orange bark, green and white hostas and rainbow Swiss chard all in close proximity of each other. Let’s just hope I’ll be able to handle all the color a few months from now when I’ll be too busy with other things to change it.

Hopefully it will all come together in the end and look great once the plants mature.

puggle dog pet chickens

Now, if Lucy could just convince those chickens that she just wants to be their friend, everything would be perfect.

Peace Out Girl Scouts, I’m off to make dinner.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Your Own Food – 2013 Garden Tally

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heirloom winter squash picture{Winter Squash 2012}

This year I’m on a mission to grow 4,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables in my suburban backyard. In 2012 I was able to grow 2,028 pounds, and in 2013 I’m going double or nothing. I have absolutely no idea if I’ll be able to achieve my goal. But, as with any adventure, half the fun is getting there.   ~Mavis

terra cotta pots planting

This past week I harvested a whopping 5 ounces of Swiss chard.

Whop.t.do.

My kitchen, laundry room, and garage all look like a giant garden bomb went off and it’s getting a little tough to keep up. There is potting soil, seeds and containers everywhere, and I am waiting for the HH to make a crack about how he’s living in a garden center.

If I could just have one full day all to myself {no cooking, cleaning, talking, typing, walking} I think I could get caught up. I think.

I can dream right?

It might be time to plug in some headphones, make a giant list, and just power through a day planting, potting, tagging, and marking things off my list with a big fat sharpie as I go. I think that’s part of the problem. I need to get organized.

But first, do you have any suggestions to songs? I need some tunes first. Then I’ll make my list.

~Mavis

Here is what I have harvested so far this year:

how to can beets{Heirloom beets pictured from last summer}

Beets - 14 ounces

I’ll be planting some more beets this week. I think I am going to try and grow enough to can a years worth of pickled beets. No one else in our house really cares for pickled beets, but I do!

Parisian Carrots{Tonda di Parigi HEIRLOOM carrots pictured from last summer}

Carrots – 3 ounces

I can’t wait to start planing carrots!

egg count 2013

Egg Count – 329 {4.6 per day average}

This week we collected 59 eggs. I have a lot of baking to do so I they’ll all be used and I won’t have any left over to trade with Girly Girl or Mrs. HB this time around.

microgreens
Lettuce
– 6 ounces
Microgreens 5 ounces

Microgreens are easy to grow anytime of year but they are especially fun to grow in winter as it is typically to cold to grow lettuce and greens outside. See those cute heart shaped leaves? Those are radish greens and they are super tasty too.

cool kitchen scale

Potatoes – 2 pounds 9 ounces

I was able to get 15 pounds of  potatoes planted last weekend, but I still have 75 more pounds to get in the ground. I need to schedule an entire work day in the garden here pretty so I don’t get behind on all my planting tasks.

bean sprouts

Sprouts - 8 ounces

I need to grow some more, I miss having them on my egg salad sandwiches.

swiss chard

Swiss Chard 11 ounces

Think of all the money brides would save if they used bouquets of Swiss chard instead of roses. Hmmm.

cut wheatgrass

Wheatgrass - 7 ounces

Total Food Harvested in 2013: 5 pounds 15 ounces

Total Eggs Collected in 2013: 329

Have you planned out your garden yet for this year? Are you feeling overwhelmed like I am? If not, what is your secret?

~Mavis

free shipping botanical interests

Need some seeds? Botanical Interests is offering FREE SHIPPING on orders over $50 right now.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Transplanting Spring Bulbs and Strawberries in Gutters

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tulip bulbs

This morning Lucy and I headed out early and did a little work in the garden.

transplanting tulip bulbs

I transplanted some tulip bulbs I had planted in containers last fall, while she went exploring in the greenhouse.

miracle Gro potting mix

After getting the bulbs in the ground, we planted a few gutters with strawberry plants. If you are looking for a fun or alternative way to grow berries this year, growing your strawberries in gutters might be what you are looking for.

I’m sure you all know by now my favorite potting soil is made by Miracle Gro. I have no idea why I’m addicted to the stuff. There are a million different brands out there, but this is the kind I like.

grow food in gutters

Basically if you are going to try and grow berries {or anything else for that matter} in gutters, you’ll need to line the bottom of the gutters with about 1/2 an inch of pea gravel before adding dirt. This will help to aerate the soil.

strawberry crown

Then, all you do is plant your strawberry crowns and wait for them to grow. With any luck, you should be swimming in berries by late June or early July.

strawberries in gutters

Here is a picture of what my strawberry gutters looked like last summer. Pretty niffty huh?

What’s happening at YOUR place? Have you planted anything yet? Indoors, outdoors, in your greenhouse, in your mama’s basement?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Zinnias {Start to Finish}

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zinnia seeds

Last night I planted a few flats of zinnias and placed them under grow lights. I couldn’t be more excited. I’ve heard they are really easy to grow and since I’d like to expand my flower garden, I thought zinnias would add a pop of color.

These are the varieties I’ll be growing this year:

  • Envy - I LOVE how they are all green!
  • Fantasy – Purple and pink flowers are my favorite.
  • Fireball Blend – Normally I don’t plant red and orange flowers in my garden, but they looked cool so I’m going for it.

Brief description:  Zinnias are an easy to grow annual flower.  They have big blooms and provide large bursts of color to your garden, and can be cut and brought indoors for an easy bouquet.

Where to Plant Zinnias:  Zinnias must have a sunny location.  They will adapt to any kind of soil, but prefer well-drained soil.  Depending on the variety, they make great borders in flower beds, container and window box flowers.  Some varieties will even thrive in hanging baskets.

zinnia seed photo

I always like to try and include photos of the seed because they are just so stinkin’ interesting!

Planting Seeds:   Plant 1/4″ deep.  Thin to 1 seedling per grow pot when plants are about 2″ tall.  Transplant 1-2 weeks after average last frost.

Growing Tips:  Zinnias are susceptible to fungal spots, powdery mildew, and bacterial wilt.  You can minimize the possibility of these diseases by avoiding watering the leaves.  Deadhead to promote new flowers.

zinnias

How to Harvest:  To harvest, just cut the stem at desired length.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

Have YOU ever grown zinnias before? Do you have a favorite variety?

~Mavis

Why Plant Zinnias?  Zinnias attract butterflies to your garden, and who doesn’t love that?

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Plot Pictures – Week 11 of 52

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raised garden beds

Week 11 of 52 – Mavis’ Backyard Garden Plot

Now that all the bark has been spread, I feel like the garden is finally in order. Although the bark is a wee bit on the bright side, it’s easier for me to visualize where I want to plant everything, and I must admit, it does look tidy. And I am a HUGE fan of tidy gardens, and they make my heart smile {if that’s even possible}.

old watering cans

A few of the daffodils are beginning to bloom, but no enough to start picking bouquets to bring in the house yet. I’ve decided to plant peas along the fence again. I figured I might as well use the space for something since I won’t be able to plant sunflowers there until June.

recycled wood pallet garden

I planted endive in one of the pallets, and am hoping to transfer out some more lettuce starts and spinach pretty soon.

raised garden beds

Even thought there is nothing really growing yet, this is my favorite view of the garden anytime of year. It makes me feel like the possibilities are endless.

espalier trees

I planted the espalier trees along side the house yesterday.

bean teepees

Bean teepees and future potato beds.

poppies in garden

So far I have poppies, rhubarb and artichokes planted in this area. I’m not sure if I should try and squeeze anything else in. I think one of the hardest parts about gardening is trying to keep in mind what plants are going to look like once they are fully grown. Ha!

glass greenhouse english green

I think we have about another 2-3 weeks until the early tulips I planted in the black pots start to bloom. If you look closely you can see the chives springing back to life on the sides of the greenhouse.

recycled wood pallet compost bin

Call me crazy, but I am going to try potato towers again. I haven’t planted them yet, but hopefully I’ll get to them later this week.

wooded backyard garden

View of the main backyard.

omlet chicken coop eglu cube orange

The chicken/ kale /Swiss chard/ fava bean garden. I still have a few more plants to set out, but it’s coming along nicely I think.

backyard orange bark

Future pumpkin patch.

spooner farms raspberry patch

Raspberry patch.

herb garden

The future herb garden. I think we still have 2 large pots in the garage that I need to drag out and fill with dirt and herbs. Also, I noticed the rhubarb I planted last year in this area is just now starting to pop up. I think I’ll move it towards the greenhouse though so I just have herbs in this area. We’ll see.

So what’s new at your place? Are you itching to get out there?

~Mavis

free shipping botanical interests

This years garden is being sponsored by the awesome folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company.  You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2013 Garden Seed Catalog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Espalier Trees, Pallet Gardening, Kale Starts and More

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espalier trees

Yesterday I brought home 2 espalier trees. I’ve always wanted to plant a few but never really had the right spot. Or so I thought. The sunniest spot in our backyard garden is where we have the 16 raised garden boxes.

So later today I plan on digging a few holes and planting these beauties {1 pear & 1 apple} along side the house where they will get lot’s of sunshine.

espalier tree branches

I highly doubt we will get any fruit this season, but they will look cool in the years to come once they get established. I’m excited.

grow lettuce in a wood pallet

In between spreading bark, I planted a raised wood pallet with some endive starts. Pretty soon I’ll also be planting spinach and a couple of other things for my wood pallet salad garden.

kale seedlings

More kale seedlings were set out as well. The chickens think I am torturing them.

red bark

Monkey Boy and I were able to finish bark bombing the main backyard area. I was going to carve out another garden plot but he was wheeling the bark back so fast I didn’t have time.

Which is fine really, because it just gives me a little more time to stare at it with my sunglasses and try and figure out where the 15x 20 plot should go. I’ll keep you posted.

raspberry patch

Since there is still about 5 – 7 yards of bark left, today Monkey Boy and I are going to try and get the side yard completed. I need to get a few weeds pulled over there first, but hopefully between the two of us, we should be able to get it done.

cascadia raspberries in winter

High Ho, High Ho, it’s off to work I go.

Have a great Saturday, and stay out of trouble.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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