Grilled Peaches

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how-to-grill-peaches-picture

We had a few peaches left over after we froze peaches the other day and we decided to grill a few for dinner. I came across this easy peasy recipe for grilled peaches last year and my family absolutely loves it.

If you have never tried grilled peaches before, you don’t know what you are missing!

grilled-peaches-recipe

Ingredients

3 ripe peaches, halved, pits removed
1 Tbs. olive oil
1 Tbs. brown sugar

dinner-plate-grilled-peaches

Directions

Preheat grill {I used the medium setting}.

Brush peach halves with olive oil and place them on the grill face side down.  After about 3 to 4 minutes {when the peaches have grill marks} turn them over and sprinkle the peaches with brown sugar. Remove peaches from the grill after the brown sugar has caramelized a bit {2 minutes or so} and serve warm.

Have YOU ever grilled peaches before?  Do you have a secret recipe you’d like to share?

Mavis

Grillin’ with Gas: 150 Mouthwatering Recipes for Great Grilled Food

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Friday Night at the Movies – Winged Migration

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Tonight my buddy Lola and I  plan on watching Winged Migration.  It’s a documentary that took nearly 3 years to film and follows several species of birds on their migrations.  It doesn’t just show the migration, though, it also follows them before they head off, while they look for food and prepare their babies for the journey.  It’s supposed to be a really beautifully done documentary.

winged migration

Amazon Prime Members can watch Winged Migration for free.

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Top 10 Things to Pack for a Day Hike

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Top 10 Things to Pack for a Day HIke

After a winter and spring of rain and cold, I can’t wait to get outdoors, and what better way than a hike?  I am lucky to have tons of options for awesome day hikes in Washington—and even luckier that the The Girl and Monkey Boy are willing to go with me.

If you plan on heading out to the great outdoors, here’s a must-have list to pack in your daypack:

  1. Camera.  I’m sure it goes without saying, but chances are, you will see some pretty cool stuff out there.  And, as the old adage goes:  ”Take a picture, it’ll last longer.”
  2. Water.  If you are going all minimalist and don’t want to carry a backpack, do yourself a solid, and carry a bottle of water.  You’re going to work up a sweat and you’ll need to replenish.  Enough said.
  3. Sunscreen and Bug Spray.  I love the summer, but the elements will turn on you.  Don’t underestimate the sun’s ability to peek its way through a tree canopy.  Sunscreen good, melanoma bad.  Also, if you get anywhere near the water, the mosquitoes will show no mercy.  Best just to lay down some cover fire.
  4. Snacks.  Okay, the thing is, sometimes you feel snackish and packing something is just a pleasant way to suppress your appetite.  Other times, you take a wrong turn and find that a 3 hour hike turns into a 6 hour one–here’s where that snack becomes a really happy little treat.
  5. First Aid Kit.  It may seem like overkill shove all of this into a backpack, but blisters, scrapes, etc. can really ruin a perfectly good afternoon.  Better to be prepared.
  6. A lighter.  No, not for your Marlboro’s, but in case something goes wrong and you find yourself hunkering down for a night in the wilderness.  Seriously, this could be a life saver and takes up hardly any space.
  7. A knife.  There are about a billion ways a knife could come in handy on a hike.  It is a simple must-have.  I always throw a leatherman into my backpack.  It basically does everything.
  8. Hiking boots.  I know this one really doesn’t go into your pack, but I consider it a must-have for one reason:  snakes.  Snakes hiding in the grass will typically strike at feet and ankles–a protective layer around those two body parts seems like a no-brainer.
  9. Map and/or compass.  Face it, getting lost sucks, whether it’s in the city or in the out-of-doors.  A little prevention goes a long way.
  10. Garbage Bag.  A garbage bag is like a multi-purpose tool in the day hike world.  Best case scenario, you have a handy little garbage can for your wrappers from that snack.  Worst case, you have a make-shift rain poncho.

Also, please imagine me saying this in my best mom voice:  make sure to tell someone where you are going.  It’s a simple way to make sure that should you get lost, someone would come looking for you.  {Maybe I should have suggested telling someone who likes you, to ensure they will actually come looking for you.  Ha.}

What have you learned to throw in your pack?

~Mavis

Read More Travel Tips

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Dehydrate Kiwifruit

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how to dehydrate kiwi fruit

Remember all that kiwi fruit I scored from the chicken scrap boxes last week? Well I certainly didn’t want it to go to waste and since there’s only so much kiwi I can force my family to eat before it goes bad, I dehydrated it. And man were the results tasty! Now I can throw these in a trail mix or use them as a quick healthy snack on the run.

Did you know that a kiwi fruit has more vitamin C than an orange?! Too bad the pirates didn’t know about this, I bet it could have prevented a few cases of scurvy.

kiwi fruit sliced

How to Dehydrate Kiwi

Wash kiwi, trim the brown peel from the outer edge, and cut into slices 1/4-1/2 inch thick {an egg slicer makes this step super easy!}. The thinner the slices, the quicker the kiwifruit will dehydrate.

how to dehydrate kiwi fruit

Arrange slices in a single layer on the dehydrator tray. Cover & set dehydrator to 135 degrees.

how to dehydrate kiwi fruit
Check the kiwifruit slices after six hours. Dehydrated kiwifruit slices will not be crisp like banana chips but bendable and a wee bit chewy. They can take anywhere from 6-12 hours to dehydrate.

Have you ever tried dried kiwifruit before? The Girl Who Thinks She’s a bird really like it. But then again, I don’t think there is a dried fruit she doesn’t like. ;)

~Mavis

Looking for more yummy things to dehydrate? Check out how to dehydrate:

Apples
Mushrooms
Carrots
Watermelon
Tomatoes
Swiss Chard
Strawberries

food dehydrator and book

Are you a dehydrator rookie? Well this book and this dehydrator are your 1st step to becoming a dehydrating master. You can thank me later.

The Dehydrator Bible: Includes over 400 Recipes

Nesco American Harvest Food Dehydrator

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Pallet Gardening – Planting Swiss Chard

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pallet gardening garden

The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird and I worked in the pallet garden the other day placing new Ruby Red Swiss chard transplants from the greenhouse in to the pallet that used to be growing spinach.

Ruby Red Swiss Chard

The Swiss chard was started in the greenhouse about a month ago and now that it’s starting to heat up in there, were decided to move it on out.

pallet gardening celery

The celery we started from seed back in January under grow lights is doing great. As long as I can keep it well watered we should be harvesting celery by the end of summer.

pallet gardening beans

Remember the dried beans I planted? Well this pallet is doing pretty good.

pallet gardening fail

This pallet, not so much. Clearly it was attacked by evil slugs. I spread a bunch of Sluggo down and replanted the pallet though so with any luck, we’ll get some beans in about 60 days.

pallet gardening strawberries

The strawberry pallet garden is rockin’. Look at all those runners it’s putting out and if you look real close, you can flashes of red berries beneath the leaves.

pallet garden Pictures

Here’s a view of the entire pallet garden from the potting bench. :) The Swiss chard is still a little droopy from transplanting but it should perk up soon.

Did you plant a pallet garden this year?

How is it doing? Are you happy with the results?

Mavis wants to know.

heat treated wood pallet

Want to learn more about wood pallet gardening and how I put mine together? Click on the pallets above and it will take you to my first pallet garden post of the year. You’ll also learn what to look for when choosing a pallet.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mornings with Mavis – Grow Your Own Food Tee, How to Make Mozzarella Cheese, TNT Fireworks

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mornings with mavis

Where’s the beef? ;)

Happy Friday.What are your plans for the weekend? Doing anything fun? Plan on going to the butcher shop to get some meat? Uwajimaya in Seattle has some great deals on beef if you are interested. We noticed Oxtails for $5.99 a pound and ground beef in funny shapes in the refrigerated cases.  The only thing is, how do you order it?

Ya, umm, I’ll take an arm and a leg of beef please?!

Here are a few deals I spotted for you this morning, have a great day everyone,

Mavis

philosophy fragrance

Philosophy Fragrance Buy 1 Get 1 Free Sale

Today June 28th, through Sunday, June 30th, buy one Philosophy fragrance, get another fragrance 50% off when you use promo code: junebogo

kenneth cole sandals

 

Zulily has Kenneth Cole Reation Sandals, Sneakers and Flats on sale as well as Nocona Boots.

Already a Zulily Member? Go HERE to Get This Dealgrow your own food t shirtAttention gardeners, Amazon has the Grow Your Own Food T-shirt on sale for only $17.95 right now.

strawberry bag

Amazon currently has this Reusable Strawberry Compact Bag for only $1.01 shipped. I have one of these and I use it all the time.

rei summer sale coupon

Attention REI shoppers, don’t forget if you can earn a $20 REI bonus card when you purchase $100 or more at REI until June 30th.

planters nuts coupon

Print a coupon good for $1.00 off ONE (1) PLANTERS Nuts, 4 oz. or larger


lacucinasep2012

Discount Mags is offering a 1 year subscription to La Cucina Italiana Magazine for only $4.99 a year when you use code MAVIS at checkout. This deal will expire tonight 6/28/13 at midnight EST so be sure and grab your subscription before then.

how-to-make-mozzarella-cheese

Making mozzarella cheese is easier than you think. You’ll find my favorite recipe in my How to Make Mozzarella Cheese post.

Would you like to know your credit score?

Credit Sesame is a free online personal finance tool that gives consumers an easy way to monitor and manage their credit and loans all in one place and save money on debt. It provides consumers with free access to their credit score every month, analysis, advice and tools to take control of their finances, unlock their credit potential and borrow smarter. The greatest perk of Credit Sesame, it’s 100% Free! They don’t require a credit card, and there are no trial periods.

Credit Sesame has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, on The Today Show and CNNMoney.com.

Go HERE to find out your Credit Score for FREE!

TNT Fireworks Coupon

Planning on buying fireworks for the fourth of July? Groupon is offering a $45 worth of  TNT Fireworks for only $20. There are 17 locations where you can redeem this.

New to Groupon? Join Groupon Here!

suncadia resort picture

Amazon Local is offering a Two-Night Stay at Suncadia Plus $50 Resort Credit. We stayed at Suncadia a few years ago during ski season an loved it!

mavis gnomes one hundred dollars a month

We are still collecting Garden Gnomes for road trip to St. Jude in Memphis, Tennessee this summer. If you have not sent one in yet, please consider doing so. $10 will be donated for each garden gnome we receive* by August 1st, 2013. Up to $10,000.

Find More Printable Coupons

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

July Fourth Dessert Recipe – Red, White and Blue Cupcakes

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The 4th of July is only is only a few days away, do you have any special plans? If you’re looking for fun treat to help liven up dessert time at your picnic, these festive red, white and blue cupcakes might do the trick.

Simply divide your cake mix batter between 3 bowls and add food coloring.

Slowly add red, white and blue batter.

Bake for 18 minutes at 350°.  Cool on a wire rack.

Frost with vanilla icing and and you’re all set.

Have a fun and SAFE 4th of July!

Looking for an American Flag?  Well look no further, Amazon has a bunch in stock!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Laurie Sends in Pictures of Her Chicken Coop Tractor and Garden Beds

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how to build a chicken tractor

A big THANK YOU to everyone who has sent in their photographs and stories. I hope by sharing other peoples pictures and stories here on One Hundred Dollars a Month we can all have a rock star garden this summer. Keep them coming!

how to build a raised garden bed

Laurie and her husband are first time gardeners {and chicken owners} from Southern Louisiana.

Here is what she had to say about their chicken coop/tractor, that thry built with an enclosed gravity feeder, and pictures of their garden boxes thry built this year as well.

raised garden beds

“Gardening has been a learning experience in patience for me. As I was happily buying up seed packets that were labeled heirloom, non-GMO, the locals were snickering at us in the store. We couldn’t figure out why? See we just moved to Louisiana from California a year ago, and I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Come to find out from our local gardening center “hero”, Manny, many of the seed packets I bought are for veggies and fruits that wont really grow too well here, our climate is too wet, and then shifts from cold to immediate HOT and burns the plants. (I think stores should NOT sell you stuff in an area they know it wont grow in!)

rasied garden beds

I was so excited to try to grow our own food! I had visions of green bean towers, and spinach clusters and huge robust tomato plants and big watermelon vines. I started all of our seedlings in the house late February, and at the end of March I transplanted our happy little seedlings into our “garden soil” filled boxes we spent all weekend building. I made sure the soil we filled with had lots of rabbit poop mixed into it, as I have read that its one of the best compost materials out there. And we waited. And waited…and waited. And still waiting for something to happen.

raised garden beds

The plants have gotten a very slight amount bigger, and my strawberry plants bloomed and put on berries. and the bell pepper plants grew tall, bloomed… but nothing? The squash plants now have big yellow blooms on them just starting. but my watermelon…has not grown. My cantaloupe? nothing. My broccoli and cauliflower? No change either. I took samples of the soil in to Manny to test. He said it was not too alkaline nor too acidic. I changed watering time from the evening to the morning.

bees in frame

We brought in our own bee hives. (my husbands latest passion hobby is “beeking” Bee Keeping) We have Queen Victoria in hive one and Queen Latihfa in hive two.

So in any case, as we learn from this endeavor, and try to figure it out, try not to laugh too much at our newbie mistakes :)

chicken coop tractor picture

Our coop came about also after trial and error, predators and floods, and crazy downpours. We have a small flock of 2 RIR, 2 Ameraucana, 2 Orpingtons, and 4 “mutt” chickens someone dumped off in a cage behind my husbands work center. When he brought those poor bedraggled youngsters home, it was apparent our little doll house coop we had would no longer suffice.

chicken coop ladder

So he built a larger, portable one that has an on board gravity feeder that will hold up to 50 lbs of layer crumble at a time. Currently, he is working on making an automatic float type waterer that will feed from a rain catch barrel on a stand, through a hose to inside the run. In any case, its a work in progress LOL.”

Laurie I think you are doing great, especially for a first time gardener. Keep up the great week!

~Mavis

2liter bottles for gardening

Heather Sends in Her Backyard Garden Photos

If you would like to have your garden, chicken coop or something you’ve made featured on One Hundred Dollars a Month, here’s what I’m looking for:

  • Your Garden Pictures and Tips – I’d especially like to see your garden set ups, growing areas, and know if you are starting seeds indoors this year. If so,  show me some picture of how you are going about it.
  • Your Chicken and Chicken Related Stories – Coops, Chicks, Hen’s, Roosters, Eggs, you name it. If it clucks, send us some pictures to share with the world.
  • Cool Arts & Crafts - Made from your very own hands with detailed {and well photographed} pictures and instructions.
  • Your pictures and stories about your pets. The more pictures and details the better.
  • Garage Sale, Thrift Store and Dumpster Diving pictures and the stories behind the treasures you found including how much you paid for them.

If I feature your pictures and the stories behind them on One Hundred Dollars a Month, I will send you a $20.00 gift card to the greatest store in the world: Amazon.com.

Go  HERE for the official rules.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Parsnips {Start to Finish}

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parsnip seed packet

I planted my parsnip seeds last night so that they will be ready by Thanksgiving.  The awesome thing about them is that they actually taste better after a freeze, so you can keep them in the ground until you’re ready to eat them.  If you haven’t ever tried them, I seriously recommend it–they have a taste somewhere between a carrot and a potato, but don’t pack the same carbohydrate punch.

parsnip seeds

Brief description: Parsnips are a root vegetable, and a cousin to the carrot family {Though they hardly speak at family reunions.  Ha.}

Where to Plant Parsnips:  Raised beds or garden beds in loose soil.  They prefer full sun, but will also grow in part shade, just with lower yields.

Planting Seeds:  Soak seeds in water for 12-24 hours prior to planting.  Plant seeds 1/2″ deep every 3″.  Parsnips are ridiculously SLOW to germinate, so don’t be surprised if you don’t see anything for at least two weeks.  Loosen the soil all around the planting site.

soak parsnip seeds

Growing Tips:  The hardest part about growing parsnips is actually getting them started.  They are the one thing {well, there’s probably others, but off the top of my head I can’t think of them} that you need to get fresh seeds for every year.  The seeds just do not store well, and the number one reason most people struggle to grow them is because their seeds are not fresh.  For best taste, allow them to stay in the ground through the first hard freeze.  The freeze will turn the starches into sugar, creating a yummy little treat.  Parsnips will also over-winter really well, if you cover the leaves with soil and then top that off with a healthy layer of hay or straw.  It’s a great way to get root veggies through the sparse spring months.

parsnips

How to Harvest:  Harvest parsnips much like you would potatoes.  Dig them up with a shovel, being careful not to puncture them or destroy their roots.  Because they store well in the ground, just dig them up as needed, leaving the rest for when you want them again.  Parsnips are ready to harvest somewhere between 95-120 days, depending on the variety you choose.

Fun Facts about Parsnips:  

  • In Scotland, parsnips are called white carrots.
  • Parsnips date as far back as Roman times and were thought to be an aphrodisiac.
  • Before the arrival of potatoes to the new world, parsnips were a staple, along with other root vegetables.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Greenhouse Gardening in the Pacific Northwest

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magnum glass greenhouse

It’s been awhile since I’ve shared pictures of the greenhouse with you so I snapped a few pictures last night.

potato plants

If you look really close you can see a hint of pink near the greenhouse glass. That’s a stargazer lily plant. This is my first year growing lilies and something tells me I probably should not have planted the bulbs alongside the greenhouse but oh well, at least it will add a little color to the area.

greenhouse gutters

Inside the greenhouse the cucumber plants are starting put our vines. Pretty soon I’ll be guiding them towards the top of the greenhouse with twine.

greenhouse cucumbers

Here’s a close up of the cucumber plant.

grow basil in gutters

The basil we planted in gutters is thriving. Pretty soon I’ll have to thin it.

tomatoes in stock tank

The two green zebra tomato plants we planted in the stock tank are getting nice and plump.

huge tomato stalk

Look how thick the tomato stem is.

grow strawberries in gutters

Strawberries are still hanging tough in the greenhouse gutters.

strawberry

These are Tri-Star berries in case you were wondering.
meyer lemon buds

And last but not least. Take a look at Lemon, the Meyer Lemon Tree. Ain’t she a beauty? Look at all those baby lemons she’s trying to grow. A greenhouse heater is definitely on my wish list for this fall. Since this is my first year growing citrus in the Pacific Northwest, I have no idea how many lemons I’ll get, but even if I only end up with a handful, it will be totally worth it.

Growing your own food is cool, no matter how you do it.

Keep calm and garden on.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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