Planting Perennial Fruits

cascadia raspberries

Do you have any perennial fruits planted in your garden?  I love the idea of putting a little work in upfront and then enjoying the “fruits of my labor” for years to come.  In fact, I pretty much like anything that requires minimal effort with maximum output, don’t you just wish all of life was that way?

A lot of perennial fruits take space–like lots of space, even if you don’t have room for an orchard, though, you still can have a pretty sweet fruit garden.  Several fruits can be grown in containers or take up very little space.  Most fruit perennials require full sun.  Several of them, also require more than one tree in order to fruit.

apples

If you want a super low maintenance garden, you might want to take a list of these fruit perennials {remember, perennials vary by region, so make sure to check and see if they are actually a perennial in your area before you buy and plant} and see if they might work in your space:

  1. Apples {some dwarf varieties can be kept in containers}
  2. Apricots
  3. Avocado
  4. Blackberries
  5. Blueberries
  6. Cherries
  7. Currants
  8. Figs
  9. Goji Berries
  10. Huckleberries
  11. Grapes
  12. Kiwi {cold hard kiwi vines actually exist}
  13. Lemons {work well in containers}
  14. Limes
  15. Nectarines
  16. Oranges
  17. Peaches
  18. Pears {self-pollinating varieties exist if you don’t have room for 2, though, I have heard that they don’t produce as well}
  19. Persimmon
  20. Plums
  21. Raspberries
  22. Strawberries {I personally think these only last 3-5 years before you have to start over in order to get good crops, they can definitely be grown in containers}

pears on tree

Have you had any luck growing any of these in smaller spaces?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Planting Perennial Vegetables

Planting Perennial Vegetables

Planting Perennial Vegetables

Remember those old Ronco infomercials? “Set it and forget it” was the theme I think…that’s kind of the way I feel about perennials, a little work up front and then you just forget about them.

Incorporating perennial vegetables into your garden is pretty simple.  The key is making sure that  you take care of the dirt.  The year after you plant, you want to add a little compost and mulch.  Do that yearly, and those bad boys will literally do all of the rest of the work for you.  The beauty of veggie perennials is that they have varying needs for sun, so if you don’t have a bright sunny spot, you may still be able to find one that will work.

fresh artichokes

Not sure which veggies are actually perennials?  Here is a quick guide of veggies you can choose from:

  1. Globe artichokes.  Yep, if you treat them right in the winter by cutting them back in the fall and then covering them with straw, they will produce year after year.
  2. Asparagus.  Asparagus is one of those plant it and then wait.  It takes a full 3 years to get a crop from them, after that though, they are rather prolific and you’ll have asparagus every spring.  {Remember to let them go to flower at the end of the year so that they have a chance to come back.}
  3. Rhubarb.  Rhubarb, once established will produce for you for a lifetime.  Seriously, I know people who got their rhubarb from their grandparents.  It just needs a sunny locale to be happy.
  4. Sorrel.  This is an herb, actually, but a lot of times you will get it in upscale restaurants in a salad.  It kind of has a lemony flavor.
  5. Onions.  If you don’t harvest all of the onions each year, you can leave them in the ground and they will survive some pretty cold conditions.  That way, you can juts pop outside and pull them as you need them.
  6. Horseradish.  As long as you only harvest the side shoots, horseradish will continue to produce year after year.
  7. Kale.  Gross Super healthy kale will literally keep producing all winter long.  It doesn’t mind the cold, and with regular pickings, you can get quite a few seasons out of it.
  8. Radicchio.  Like kale, radicchio can survive harsh winters and produce for several seasons, provided that you just pick the young new leaves.
  9. Garlic.  Most people dig garlic up year to year, but you can leave some in the ground and let them die back just as you would bulbs.  They will divide their own bulbs with time.

picking rhubarb

Just like all perennials, vegetable perennials can vary by region, so make sure to double check that your region can support whatever you choose.  Whichever perennial you choose, take a minute to celebrate that at least there are still some super reliable and simple food sources left in life.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Store Winter Squash

How to Store Winter Squash

How to Store Winter SquashWinter squash are like potatoes.  If you store them right, they will seriously last you most of the winter–at least until you can get out and grow yourself some cool weather kale and spinach.

heirloom-butternut-squashTo ensure that you get the longest life out of your squash, start by picking it at the right time.  The squash shouldn’t be wet at all, so don’t pick after the sprinklers have come on or after a rain.  Cut the squash from the vine, instead of pulling it.  That way, you won’t accidentally break off the stem too close to the squash, causing a blemish that will speed up rot.  Also, make sure to pick it before the nighttime temperatures dip into the 40’s.  Don’t let the name fool you, winter squash does not like it to be too cold.

anna swartz hubbard squashThe first step in storing winter squash is curing.  Curing is basically a fancy word for leaving the squash out somewhere warmish with good air circulation and ignoring for a week and a half to two weeks.  Curing helps make sure any excess water leaves the squash and makes it taste better long term.

Some people like to give their squash a quick diluted bleach bath before storage.  It helps to kill any fungus or bacteria on the squash.  If you do decide to give your squash a bath, dilute it 1 part bleach to 10 parts water.  Rinse well after the bath and dry completely before storing.  This step is completely optional.

hubbard squashWinter squash are happiest when stored at about 55 degrees.  If you have a root cellar, well, then I’m jealous.  If you don’t, your best bet is going to be a basement or garage.  They need to be completely dry throughout storage, so either keep them up on a shelf or in a box, where water from melting snow off of the cars, etc. can’t get to them.

Depending on the type of squash you are storing {acorn has the shortest shelf life, while blue hubbard has one of the longer shelf lives}, it will last anywhere from 4 weeks to 7 months.

What’s the longest you’ve successfully stored a winter squash?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Garlic

fall-planting-how-to-plant-garlic-bulbs

How to Grow Garlic

Is it already time to plant garlic bulbs again? Where does the time go. It seems like it was just yesterday and I was harvesting garlic from our garden. Is it just me, or are there more things to do in the garden in the fall than in the Spring?

how-to-plant-garlic

Growing garlic is very simple and straightforward. For starters you want to try and find certified garlic bulbs {most local nurseries have it in stock this time of year}. Some people just buy garlic bulbs at the grocery store, but a lot of times produce {even bulbs} can be sprayed to slow growth, so I like to buy certified garlic bulbs so I know exactly what I’m getting. Botanical Interests and Territorial Seed have a great selection.

fall-how-to-plant-garlic-bulbs

To plant garlic, first break the bulb apart and inspect the cloves for any damage.  Toss any cloves that are brown or have decay on them. Next, plant the garlic about 2″ deep and about 6″ apart in loose, well drained soil. Cover the bulbs with soil, water and walk away. Mother Nature will take care of the rest until spring. Unless of course you live somewhere where it never rains during the fall and winter months. If that’s the case, then be sure and give your garlic bed a drink every now and again.

fall-planting-how-to-plant-garlic-bulbs

Once the garlic begins to sprout in the spring, I like to cover my garlic patch with a couple inches of leaf litter to help insulate the garlic bulbs a bit from the cold {if you live in a warmer climate you don’t need to do this}.

how to grow garlic shoot

I don’t know about you, but I use garlic practically every day in my cooking, so it’s really nice to be able to grow it in my backyard each year for a nice stash when I need it.

How to Grow Garlic

  • Plant cloves 6 to 8 weeks before a hard freeze so the roots have a chance to get established
  • Do not break cloves until you are ready to plant
  • Plant cloves 2″ deep with the root end down and the point side up
  • Space cloves 4″- 6″ apart {depending on size}

elephant garlic bulbWill you be growing garlic this year?

How many bulbs do you usually by each year and when do YOU plant your garlic?

~Mavis

Looking for more information in growing, cultivating and enjoying garlic?  Check out the book The Complete Book of Garlic By Ted Jordan Meredith.  Amazon currently has it in stock and ready to ship.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Broccoli Raab {Start to Finish}

Broccoli raab seed packet

Broccoli raab seed packet

Have you thought about your fall garden yet? This year I will be growing broccoli raab again. Why? Because it’s freakin’ delicious that’s why. 😉 I don’t even really like broccoli, but broccoli raab? Oh heck ya, bring it on.

Brief description:  Broccoli raab is also known as asparagus broccoli, broccoletto, rapini, or rabe, .  It is grown for it’s asparagus-like shoots.  It can be used in salads and vegetable dishes or it can stand alone.

Where to Plant Broccoli Raab:  In a sunny location {though it will tolerate partial shade, but with lower yields}.  Plant in raised beds, containers, or garden beds.

brocolli raab seeds

Planting Seeds:   Plant seeds 1/8″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 4-6″ {or one per pot} when seedlings are about 2″ tall.

Growing Tips:  Broccoli raab uses up quite a bit of nitrogen, so regular fertilizing is best.  Manure and/or compost soil conditioners also help yields considerably.  Requires moderate, but consistent watering.

How to Grow Broccoli Raab {Start to Finish}

How to Harvest:  When plant reaches about 1 foot high, harvest buds and leaves just under buds with scissors.

Prep Tip:  Broccoli raab has a stronger taste than regular broccoli.  If the taste is too strong, you can tame it down considerable by blanching it.  {Blanch for 2-3 minutes in heavily salted water.}

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here is my Favorite Broccoli Raab recipe:  

broccoli raab salad
Chickpeas with Broccoli Raab and Bacon

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Turnips {Start to Finish}

turnip

how to grow turnips

If you plan on growing your own turnips for Thanksgiving dinner now is the time to plant them. We planted 2 packets of Purple Top White Globe Turnips this morning and if all goes well, we’ll be swimming in them by late November.

Brief description:  Turnips are a root veggie that make great fall crops because they can withstand cooler temperatures.  You can also eat the tops:  turnip greens.

Where to Plant Turnips:  Plant in a well-drained sunny place.

turnip seeds

Planting Seeds:  For fall harvest {which usually yields sweeter turnips} plant about 2 months before average last frost.  Plant in a sunny, well-drained area.  Plant 1/4″ deep about every 3″ apart.

Growing Tips:   Keep the soil evenly moist for best growth.  At about 5″ tall, apply a mulch to protect the plants.

turnips

How to Harvest:  If you are harvesting the greens, pick only 2-3 leaves per plant at a time.  For the turnip roots, pick when they reach 2-3″ in diameter {they taste better when they are smaller}.  Harvest the roots like you would a potato or rutabaga, being careful not to damage the turnip.  

How to prepare turnips to eat:  Turnips are a great substitution to the more starchy potato.  They don’t have quite the carb load, so if that matters to you, you can still get the potato flavor without the sugars.  Turnips can be mashed, diced, sliced, roasted, and even eaten raw.  Turnip greens can be cooked or eaten raw too.  Turnip roots store for a long time–don’t wash them, just cut off the greens and place them in a single layer in a box.  Then store the box in a cool, well-ventilated area.

Fun Fact:  According to the Botanical Interests website, the Irish used to hollow out turnips and put and ember in them–which is where the idea for Jack O’ Lanterns came from.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

vegetables to plant for a fall harvest

Now is the time to start thinking about Thanksgiving root vegetables.  If you want to know what else you can plant to have in time for a Thanksgiving harvest, go HERE, and check out my fall planting guide.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Brussels Sprouts {Start to Finish}

brussels sprout sprouts stalk

brussels sprouts

 

Are you thinking about growing Brussels sprouts this year for a winter harvest? Well now is the time to plant those seeds!

Brief description: Brussels sprouts are a cabbage-like vegetable and are part of the mustard family.  They have a richer, less bitter taste than cabbage, though.

Where to Plant Brussels Sprouts:  Plant in fertile, well-drained soil in an area that receives at least 6 hours of sunlight a day.  They can be grown in raised beds or garden beds.

cabbage seeds

Planting Seeds:  Direct sow seeds 1/4″ deep.  When seedlings are 2″ tall, thin to one about every 2 feet.

Growing Tips:  Brussels sprouts like slightly acidic soil.  Don’t be tempted to cram them in tighter than 24″ apart–they are one of those plants that need plenty of space to grow.  They do best in cool weather, so as tempting as it may be to plant them in spring for a summer harvest, don’t, it makes them taste super bitter.

brussels sprout sprouts stalk

How to Harvest:  Brussels sprouts mature from the bottom up, so pick the them from the bottom up.  Pick off sprouts when they are firm and about 1-2″ in diameter.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here’s my Favorite Brussels Sprouts recipe:

Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic VinegarBrussels Sprouts with Balsamic Vinegar

Getting kids to eat brussels sprouts:  Around Halloween time is the perfect time to introduce brussels sprouts to kids.  Cook a whole Halloween feast, and tell the kids the brussels sprouts are Martian Heads.  They will love it.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Sunflowers {Start to Finish}

how to grow sunflowers

how to grow sunflowers

My daughter The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird has been planting sunflowers ever since she could walk. I’m not sure who loves them more, her or the birds that come along at the end of each summer and peck at the seeds. Not only are they beautiful to look at, but they are great for summertime bouquets too.

Brief description:  Sunflowers are annual flowers with beautiful bright flowers, usually yellow, red, or orange.  They are great for attracting bees, birds, and butterflies to your garden.

botanical interests sunflower seeds

Where to Plant Sunflowers:  Plant in a sunny location in raised beds, garden beds, and/or containers {depending on the variety}.

sunflower seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/2″-1″ deep about 1-2 weeks after last frost.  When seedlings are 2″ tall, thin to 1 every 12″.

Growing Tips:  Sunflowers love hot weather.  They are extremely hardy.

How to Harvest:  To harvest cut flowers as needed and place into water.  To harvest sunflower seeds, allow the flower heads to dry out and lightly rub the head to reveal the seeds.

regional-planting-guides

How to Roast Sunflower Seeds:  You can roast the seeds by soaking them in a salt water solution overnight.  Then drain them, pat dry, and roast them at 300 degrees for 30-40 minutes, turning them occasionally.

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Corn {Start to Finish}

how to grow corn

how to grow corn

 

Will you be planting corn this year? If so, now’s the time to plant. This year I’m trying a couple of varieties some for eating fresh and some ornamental for my fall table as well.

Brief description: Corn is one of the most widely grown crops in the world.  It is a staple food that can be cooked in about a million ways.  Corn is actually a grain, not a vegetable.

Where to Plant Corn:  Plant corn in a sunny location in raised beds or garden beds.

corn stalks

Planting Seeds:  Directly sow seeds when soil temperature is at least 60 degrees.  Plant seeds about 1″-2″ deep.  When seeds are about 4″ thin to every 4-6″ apart, and keep row spacing at about 24″.  {Over spacing corn only encourages weeds.}

Growing Tips:   There are a ton of different varieties all with different maturation rates {anywhere from 60-100 days}, , so be sure to pick one that best suits your area and your planting time frame.    Corn can be susceptible to disease, so keep a close eye on it so that you can manage it quickly.

fresh corn

How to Harvest:  Corn is ready to harvest a couple of weeks after the silks appear.  The silks will start to turn brown when it is time to harvest.  To harvest, gently pull the corn from the stock, breaking it off.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite corn recipes:

How to Can Fresh Corn
How to Can Fresh Corn

fresh-corn-pancakes-recipeFresh Corn Pancakes

roasted corn saladRoasted Corn Salad with Tomatoes and Feta

Fun Fact:  According the the Farmer’s Almanac, if you corn is harder to schuck than usual, prepare for a hard winter.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Maintain a Healthy Vegetable Garden

How to Maintain a Healthy Vegetable Garden

How to Maintain a Healthy Vegetable Garden

Did you have trouble growing veggies last year?  Every once in a while, I’ll have a bad gardening year.  Sometimes it’s beyond my control {i.e. squirrels or other critters getting into my plants} and sometimes, I’ll look back and be like, “Whoops, I can totally see how I screwed this year up.”  Gardening is definitely a learning process.

Maintaining a healthy garden isn’t really that tricky when you get right down to it, but it does involve the slightest bit of tenacity–which, on days when you would rather drink tea on the patio and only think about getting dressed eventually, can be too much to ask.  Ha!

Why Crop Rotation is Important for Healthy Soil

Here’s what I think are the basics on maintaining a healthy vegetable garden:

  1. Soil.  It seems like you should be able to stick your plant into the dirt, water it, and watch it grow, but that’s just not the case.  The soil should be prepped and cared for all through the gardening season.  Adding compost to the beds each year and basic crop rotation will go a long way in ensuring your soil can provide for your plants.  {I ignored the crop rotation principals last year and paid for it in much lower yields.  Lesson learned.  Mother Nature-1, Mavis-0. }  Now, I am a little behind the curve, so I am also going to prep my soil this winter by experimenting with cover crops.  Hopefully, they will give my soil a little added boost.
  2. Rethink your watering plan.  All plants require a different level of water, but letting vegetable crops dry out a bit before you water them is pretty universal.  Over-watered plants become susceptible to disease and fungus.  So, water thoroughly less often–allowing the soil to dry out in between waterings.onion transplants
  3. Start with healthy plants.  If you buy your plants, don’t be afraid to pull them out of the container and examine their roots.  A healthy root system and plant gives you a huge head start in maintaining your garden.  The same goes for plants you grow from seed.  If you have a weak one, get rid of it.  It’s survival of the fittest here–don’t be sentimental.  :)
  4. Be vigilant and proactive.  Bugs can devastate a plant pretty quickly.  Worse, if you don’t catch it in time, you have to decide whether you are going to treat the problem or lose the plant.  I try to maintain a completely organic garden.  I pick squash bugs off pretty much daily.  Last year, though, the snails won, and I opted for an organic solution called Sluggo to help me combat the slimy little beggars.

organic vegetablesWith those four basics covered, you really can maintain a pretty healthy vegetable garden with good yields.  How about you, do you have any swear-by tips for keeping your garden healthy?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Cucumbers {Start to Finish}

How to grow cucumbers seeds

This morning  I planted my cucumber seeds! I started 2 flats using some of my DIY Potting Soil blend. This year, I am growing Marketmore, Lemon, and Burpless. It’s been a while since I’ve grown lemon cucumbers so I’m looking forward to them.

Brief description: Cucumbers are part of the gourd family.  They grow from a creeping vine plant.  They are broken into three varieties:  pickling, slicing, and burpless.

Where to Plant Cucumbers:  Plant cucumbers in a sunny spot.  They prefer warm weather {soil temperature should be at least 70}, so make sure to plant after the last frost.    Cucumbers can be planted in raised beds, garden beds, or containers using a trellis.

cucumber seedlings

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/2″ deep, 6 seeds per pot or mound.  When plant has 3 leaves, thin to 3 per mound.

Growing Tips:  Cucumbers like rich soil, so mix a little compost in with your planting.  You can train cucumbers to grow up a trellis if space is an issue.

burpless-cucumbers

How to Harvest:  Read your seed packet to find out length of a full-grown cucumber for the variety you chose.  It’s better to pick them at the specified length–any larger and they will start to taste bitter.  Most cucumbers are ready 55-70 days after planting.  To harvest, pull or cut the cucumber off of the vine.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Cucumber recipes:

Easy Summer Salad Recipes – Cucumber Tomato SaladCucumber Tomato Salad

recipe quinoa saladQuinoa Salad with Cucumber and Mint

Fun Fact:  If grubs start to eat your cucumber crop, slice a cucumber and put it in an aluminum pie tin.  The cucumber will react with the metal and put off an odor {undetectable to us} that will drive the slugs away.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Care for Rhododendrons

Perennial plant care

How to Care for Rhododendrons

One Hundred Dollars a Month reader Claudia recently sent me an email asking how she should take care of a rhododendron shrub her mother in law gave her.

Here in Washington you cannot drive down the street without seeing a giant rhododendron in someones yard. A rhododendron is an evergreen that has beautiful big blooms in the spring.  It is very similar to an Azalea {except Azalea’s aren’t evergreens}.  They are perfect if you have a shady spot that is in need of some color.  {I have plenty of shady spots in my backyard, but Rhododendrons are poisonous to dogs, so sadly, I cannot have them.}

They require just a bit of TLC, but once you get the basics down, they make a great addition to your landscaping.

With Rhododendrons, the first thing to consider is soil.  They prefer a slightly acidic soil {kind of like blueberry bushes}.  So, some soil amendments might be in order.  {I use coffee grounds and pine needles to amend my soil}.

Garden tips add leftover coffee grounds to your soil

Next, consider placement.  They do not like direct sunlight, and can’t withstand a ton of wind.  So choose a shady protected area.  They are perfect for those shady areas that might be up against the house.

Next, mulch, mulch, mulch.  Rhododendrons have shallow roots that need to be protected from weather extremes, both hot and cold.  The mulching will help keep the moisture level consistent too–they like that delicate balance of not drying out and not sitting in stagnant water.  Mulching with pine needles or pine straw can help with the soil pH and protect the roots.

Finally, make sure to prune your Rhododendron immediately after they finish blooming {usually June-July}.  If you wait too long, they get a bit cranky, and may not give you flowers the next year.    To prune, just pinch back dead blooms.  Over-pruning can also lead to a couple of years of no-blooms.  If you have an established Rhododendron that has gotten too big, you may just have to bite the bullet, prune it way back, and accept a couple of years with no flowers.  They are grudge holders, but they always come back around, eventually.

Rhododendrons do not really have a ton of insect problems, and with a bit of routine maintenance, they will provide years of year-round color to your yard.

Perennial plant care

The Perennial Care Manual: A Plant-by-Plant Guide: What to Do & When to Do It

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Beans {Start to Finish}

how-to-can-green-beans-y

how to grow green beans

I don’t know one person who doesn’t like green beans. My son Monkey Boy will only eat them raw, but everyone else in our family could totally eat a plate full of delicious green sticks for dinner. There is now doubt about it, beans are cool!

Brief description: Beans have long edible pods and beans inside that can also be eaten.  They are great for snacking on raw, cooking, or canning.

Where to Plant Beans:  Plant in full sun after danger of last frost.  Plant in raised beds, garden beds, and even containers if they are big enough.

how to grow bean seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1″ deep.  Most packets say to thin them to every 4 inches, but I think that is crazy and typically space them every 2″ to maximize my crop.

growing beans

Growing Tips:  Beans are awesome for succession planting.  If you plan it right, you should be able to get a crop from June all the way through September.  I sometimes have troubles with the birds getting to my bean sprouts, so I tend to over plant them to compensate.  If the birds don’t get to them, I go back and thin them later.

How to Harvest:  To harvest, snap beans off the plant by hold the plant firmly {so that you don’t damage it while picking}.  Beans taste better when they are thinner than a pencil, so try to pick them before they get too big.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Bean recipes:

Green Beans with Sweet Onions and Bacon recipe

Green Beans with Sweet Onions and Bacon

easy pasta salad recipes

Pasta Salad with Green Beans, Tomatoes, and Roasted Peppers

how-to-can-green-beans-yHow to Can Green Beans

Fact:  Beans have been found in Egyptian tombs–apparently they thought they were easy to grow too.

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How to Maintain a Healthy Flower Garden

How to Maintain a Healthy Flower Garden

How to Maintain a Healthy Flower Garden

When I first started gardening, I did not really get the importance of integrating flowers.  I mean, I like them because they were pretty, they added curb appeal, etc.  Now, though, I see them as an important part of my garden.  When they are healthy and thriving, so is the rest of my garden.  They do most of the work in keeping a healthy, balanced garden by attracting bees and other beneficial insects to the yard.

I like to imagine they have little whistles to call in the pollinators {it’s possible I spend too much time with my plants}.

Here’s the 411 on maintaining a healthy flower garden:

  1. Soil.  Make sure to provide the right soil for however you plan on planting your flowers.  Potted flowers will suffocate in regular old dirt.  I usually make my own potting soil with my compost.  Flowers planted in flower beds also need a little TLC.  Laying down compost before you plant can provide much needed nutrients throughout the growing season.
  2. Give ’em a little wiggle room.  Whenever I see those pre-potted flowers in the stores in the spring, I wonder what they will look like in a month or so.  They are so over-crowded.  They have a lot of initial appeal {probably to entice you into buying them}, but pretty soon, they start suffocating each other out.  Plants are like humans that way–in over-crowded conditions, they start to become diseased, fight for nutrients, and die back.  Not good.
  3. Fertilize.  I usually let my chickens do most of the fertilizing, but if you don’t have that option, a good organic fertilizer will help you maintain those bright blooms.
  4. Deadhead.  Pinching back faded blooms encourages new growth and makes your flowers the envy of your neighbors.  It’s win-win.
  5. Water.  Flowers will need you to adjust their watering schedule frequently throughout the growing season.  Water when the first 2″ of soil is dry.  I feel like flowers always hang their heads when they are dry, so you can usually tell by looking at them.  Like all plants, do not let them sit in water.  Their feet {roots} get soggy and it makes them very grumpy.
  6. Do a little research.  Some flowers offer a little more bang for their buck.  For example, Marigolds repel a lot of pests.  Companion planting with flowers is a great way to maintain an organic garden.

Any more tips you can think of for keeping your flowers looking and performing their best?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Harden Off Seedlings

How to Harden Off Seedlings zinnia


How to Harden Off Seedlings

Before I can transplant all of the plants I started indoors, I will have to harden them off.  Hardening off plants is basically acclimating plants that you started indoors to the outside weather.  It allows your plants to get used to the sun, wind, rain, etc. gradually–kind of like slowly allowing your kids to experience some of life’s harsh realities {only plants won’t eat all of your food and make your house smell like dirty socks}.

I usually harden off my plants for about seven days, but some people shoot for closer to two weeks. I have milder weather here, so it is a bit easier to get them used to the outside.  About a week before you plan to harden off your plants, you need to stop fertilizing them {if you use fertilizer} and scale back on the water.

How to Harden Off Seedlings zinnia

Start the process by leaving plants in a shady spot outside for a couple hours–but make sure to bring them in at night {my favorite spot is my front porch}.  Each day, gradually increase the amount of time you leave your plants outdoors, as well as how much direct sunlight they are exposed to.  After about 7 days, your plants should be ready to stay out all day and all  night {make sure to check temperature requirements for each plant to make sure it is staying warm enough at night}.

how-to-transplant-seedlings-swiss-chard

Once you have hardened off your plants, you can transplant them into the garden.  If possible, try to transplant them on a cloudy day {pretty much always possible in my neck of the woods} and water them in well.

That’s it, it’s like the final step before the actual gardening starts.  Weeee!

~Mavis

How to Grow More Vegetables

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How to Grow Cauliflower {Start to Finish}

cabbage seedlings

white purple green cauliflower
For the past two years we have planted a packet of  the Chef’s Choice Blend Cauliflower seeds from Botanical Interests. Typically the only color of cauliflower you can find in the grocery store is white, but this packet contains three different colors; white, purple, and green. How cool is that? Eating a rainbow is pretty darn cool if you ask me.

If you are new to gardening, or are giving cauliflower a try this year, here are some handy dandy tips:

purple cauliflower

Brief description: Cauliflower is a mild vegetable that is part of the cabbage family.

Where to Plant Cauliflower:  Plant in raised beds, garden beds, and containers.  Cauliflower is a cooler weather plant, but does like full sun.

cabbage seedlings{thinning cauliflower seedlings}

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/4-1/2″ deep.  Thin to one per pot or 1 every 1-2′ when seedlings are 2″ tall.  If starting indoors, try to keep the soil temperature around 70 degrees.

cauliflower in winter

Growing Tips:   Keep soil evenly watered.  Do not allow plants to dry out completely in between watering.  If it gets hot in your area before harvest time, gently fold cauliflower leaves over the head to protect it from the heat.

cauliflower grown in fall

How to Harvest:  Harvest by cutting stalk just below the head.  Mature cauliflower is typically between 6-12″ in diamter.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Cauliflower recipes: {try to list 3}

Easy Side Dish Recipes - Roasted Cauliflower with CurryRoasted Cauliflower with Curry

roasted cauliflowerRoasted Cauliflower

cauliflower hummus recipeCauliflower Hummus

Don’t like cauliflower?  If you don’t like cauliflower, try growing orange cauliflower.  It’s typically not at the grocery store, so it’s a gardener’s monopoly, and it tastes much sweeter than regular white cauliflower.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Cabbage {Start to Finish}

cabbage seed packets

how to grow cabbage

A few days ago I transplanted some of my cabbage plants to the small garden plot along side our greenhouse. I must admit, I am not the biggest cabbage fan in the world buy my husband loves it, so that’s why I plant it. Well, and because it looks pretty darn cool in the garden too. 😉

If you are a newbie gardener, cabbage is one of the easiest vegetables to start from seed so pick a variety, and give it a try. If you have never grown cabbage before, here’s all you need to know.

cabbage seed packets

Brief description:  Cabbage is a cool season leafy vegetable.  It complements any stir-fry dishes, wraps and/or salads.

cabbage seedlings

Where to Plant Cabbage:   Raised beds, garden beds, and containers {makes a beautiful ornamental edible} in a place that gets at least 6 hours of sun per day.

cabbage seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/4″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 13″-18″ {or one per pot} when seedlings are about 3″ tall.

raised garden beds cabbage

Growing Tips:   Cabbage is a cool weather crop–though it is not a huge fan of prolonged exposure to temperatures below 50 degrees.  It does best when it has a consistent uninterrupted growing cycle, so fertile soil and regular watering is best.

puggle dog in cabbage bed

How to Harvest:  Harvest by cutting off the heads at the base of the plant.  Toss out the outer leaves of the cabbage.

puggle puppies mavis butterfiled

Fact:  Cabbage has awesome health benefits.  One cup has 91% of your daily vitamin K requirements, 190% of your daily vitamin C, and 5 grams of fiber.  It is basically a superfood–so remember to take your daily cabbage. Ha!

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Onions the Easy Way

red-onion-seedling

red-onion-seedling

If you are planning on growing onions this year but want to do it the easy way, check out my latest article on eHow about how to grow onions the easy way.

Normally, I like to grow all my onions from seed. This year, however, I took the easy way out and bought a bundle of onion starts during a visit to a local home and garden show. It cost $4, which is about the same as two packets of onion seeds. Yes, the onion starts cost a little bit more, but by planting onion starts rather than onion seeds, I’ll be able to shave about three months off my growing time and pull my onions up in July rather than late September.

Go HERE to read the full article …

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Milk Jug Greenhouse – Winter Sowing

DIY Milk Jug Greenhouse , Winter Sowing

DIY Milk Jug Greenhouse , Winter Sowing

Winter Sowing – have you heard of it? Basically, for those in colder climates, it’s magic says my friend Heather from Massachusetts.

Here’s what she had to say about the winter sowing and the milk jug greenhouses she made:

Milk Jug Greenhouse

It works like this: around January through March it’s time to make little tiny greenhouses from see-through milk jugs. Place your moistened soil and little seeds in there and seal it up. Then simply put it outside {without a lid} and let nature with all of it’s rain, snow, ice and wind do it’s thang.

Come pre-springtime your seeds will freeze and thaw as if they were out in the wild outdoors but we get the benefit of plants getting a head start and protection from the crisp air. Come springtime during the day open the lids for sunshine and air, be careful to close at night. When it’s time to plant your seedlings, put them directly into the garden – Mother Nature has already hardened them off.

This is especially awesome for perennials that take a while to get started or plants that need scarring because the freezing and unfreezing action does the scarring for you.

Milk Jug Greenhouse

Step 1: I texted all my friends with three or more kids {I was impatient to get started} :) and asked them to save their milk jugs – no explanation needed, they’re used to my bizarre projects.
Step 2: Discard the lid and cut around the milk jug except where the label is – it’ll act like a hinge.Milk Jug Greenhouse
Step 3: Punch holes in the bottom for drainage. This is surprisingly harder than I thought – I tried a knife {too skinny}, heating a screwdriver with a lighter {didn’t work} and finally settled on my handy-dandy drill which worked great.Milk Jug Greenhouse
Step 4: Fill with a couple of inches of moistened potting soil {I used a mix of potting soil, vermiculite and peat moss} in the jugs and plant your seeds according to directions.Milk Jug Greenhouse
Step 5: Seal your little mini greenhouses up with duct tape and label them so you know what’s-what come spring.
Step 7: Ready for Mother Nature!

Like seedlings, when the plants emerge in early spring, you’ll want to open up the lids during the day, watch them closely so they don’t dry out, and feed them a light liquid fertilizer.

Mother Nature does all the timing – sweet!
~ Heather

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Strawberries {Start to Finish}

grow strawberries in gutters

tri-star strawberry plants

In case you haven’t noticed, bundles of strawberry crowns are popping up everywhere. Grocery stores, nurseries, The Home Depot, you name it, they are everywhere right now so I decided to repost this tutorial on how to grow strawberries for those you who are new to gardening or just need a quick refresher course.

If you have never grown your own strawberries before they are super easy to grow and totally worth the wait. Typically you will find them in bundles of 10 or 25 crowns. I say plant as many as you have room for, but keep in mind most strawberries multiply like crazy, so if you don’t have a lot of extra room, maybe just start off with a few plants the first year.

how to grow strawberries

Brief description:  Strawberries are a sweet red easy-to-grow fruit.  Their size, taste, and harvest time depend on the variety you choose, so a couple of varieties can ensure you have strawberries all summer long.  {I grow Seascape and TriStar}

pallet garden strawberries

Where to Plant Strawberries:  Strawberries can be planted in raised beds, garden beds, as a ground cover, in pallet gardens, containers, and even hanging baskets.  {See what I mean about easy to grow?}  Wherever you plant them, just make sure it is in a sunny location.

grow strawberries in gutters{strawberries grown in gutters}

Planting Seeds:  I recommend getting starter plants from your local nursery or online.  They usually come in bundles of 25, and it really is the easiest, most cost effective way to start a strawberry garden, shy of pinching some runners off of your neighbors.  To plant purchased strawberry roots, dip them in a bucket of water to give them a little drink.  Then, dig a small hole, spread out the roots, stick them in the hole and cover them completely with dirt.  In a few weeks, you’ll have little green leaves.

strawberries grown in gutters

Growing Tips:  Strawberry plants are not great producers the first year, but should give great yields by the second growing season.  Unless they are a wild variety, they typically have a lifespan of 3 years.  After that point, berry production goes way down.  Pinching off runners and then replanting them or gifting them to the neighbors will ensure you get the most berries, as runners take valuable nutrients and energy away from the berry production.  Water consistently and don’t over-fertilize.  

strawberries

How to Harvest:  Harvest strawberries when they are firm, bright red, and fragrant–they taste best if you pick them 1-2 days after they fully develop in color.  To pick, simply pluck them off the plant at the stem.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Strawberry recipes:

Strawberry Kiwi Jam Recipe

Strawberry Kiwi Jam strawberry-pie

Strawberry Pie

Strawberry and Nutella Crepes with Bananas

Strawberry and Nutella Crepes with Bananas

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Beets {Start to Finish}

beet seeds

mavis butterfield garden blog

Yesterday, after the rain finally stopped, Lucy the Puggle Dog and I went outside and planted an entire 4×8 garden box full of beet seeds. Growing up I only liked pickled beets, but as I’ve learn to cook them over the last few years, I’ve really fallen in love with them.

The Handsome Husband and I both love them, but the kids? Well, they haven’t exactly acquired a taste for them just quite yet. But I’m sure at some point they will. 😉

botanical interests seed packets beets

This year I planted 4 varieties:

what do beet seeds look like

If you have never grown beets before {or just need a little refresher, here are a few tips:

Brief description: Beets are a sweet and delicious root veggie.

Where to Plant Beets:  Plant in raised beds and/or garden beds. 

beets

Planting Seeds:  Plant outdoors 2-4 weeks before the average last frost.  For best results, soak seeds for 8-24 hours before sowing–they will germinate faster.  Plant seeds 1/2″ deep {about 3 seeds every 4″}.  When seedlings are 2″ tall, thin to one every 4″.

heirloom beets

Growing Tips:  Beets are a cool weather crop.  They can be sown in early spring or late summer for a fall crop.  They like even moisture, so don’t let the soil dry out–mulching in the hot months will keep them cool and happy.   

picture of giant heirloom beets

How to Harvest:  Harvest when beets are 1-1/2″ to 3″ in diameter.   You can harvest the leaves for salads, cooking or garnishes.  You can also, obviously, harvest the actual beet.  You can either pull them out or dig them out–it’s really a personal preference, though, if you dig them out, make sure not to slice the beet with your shovel.  Wait to wash your beets until you are ready to use them, they will last longer that way.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Beet recipes:

roasted Red Beet & White Bean HummusRoasted Red Beet and White Bean Hummus

Roasted Beet Salad with Oranges and Walnuts

Roasted Beet Salad with Oranges and Walnuts

 

easy summer recipes raw beet carrot slawGrated Raw Beet Salad

how-to-can-pickled-beets

How to Can Beets

Interesting Fact:  About 10-15% of all U.S. adults experience beeturia (a reddening of the urine) after consumption of beets.  This is important stuff to know, don’t you agree?  Ha!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Plant an Herbal Tea Garden

Chamomile flowers

How to Plant an Herbal Tea Garden

I think we have established how much I LOVE tea.  If not, let’s just say, it is my faithful sidekick, so growing a garden that I can literally turn into tea seems like the logical next step.  Point being, I’m thinking about doing one this year.

All you need to grow an herbal tea garden is a sunny spot–and not a very big one at that.  Most of the herbs you grow for tea are also pretty to look at, so if you don’t have a spot outdoors, try a sunny window sill inside.  If you are planting them outside, you can plant them in pots or straight into  your garden beds {except for the mint–you will regret it if you don’t plant it in pots, it spreads and gets out of control fast}.  I’m thinking I am going to keep mine in pots, herb garden style.

lavender field

Here’s a list {not an exhaustive one, by any means} of herbs you can grow:

  1. Lavender.  Seriously, it adds a really nice flavor to tea and has a calming effect to boot.
  2. Bergamot.  It adds an orange flavor to your tea.
  3. Mint.  Make sure to keep this one in a container and not in your garden beds–they will spread like a weed.  Meanwhile, peppermint adds a minty flavor to your tea, and as an added bonus, mint can help to calm an upset stomach, so you can whip up some mint tea the next time you have a little indigestion.Chamomile flowers
  4. Chamomile.  Chamomile tea will help you sleep and smells amazing.  It is the foundation of ANY tea garden, in my opinion.
  5. Roses.  So, not really an herb, but still awesome for tea.  Not only are they beautiful, but the petals also make a really nice and refreshing tea.  {Make sure you don’t spray your petals with nasty stuff if you plan to use them for tea.}  Plus, the bees love them, so you are pretty much doing your whole garden a favor.
  6. Lemon Balm.  This makes a fantastic tea.  It has a nice lemon flavor {obviously} that is still pretty subtle.  Like mint, it also helps settle an upset stomach and has relaxing properties like chamomile.
  7. Lemon Thyme.  You will be able to use this one for tea and cooking.  It has a very fresh flavor, and it does alright in some shade, which makes it a little more versatile.
  8. Rosemary.  It has a very distinct flavor, which people either love or hate.  It is also one that tolerates a little shade.

rosemary

There are tons more options, but those are my personal favorites.  To make tea from your plants, you can use them fresh or dry them in your dehydrator first {you can also dehydrate them in the sun outdoors, but it takes quite a bit longer}.  Store the dried herbs in an airtight container for tea all year long.  You can even order tea bags, if you want to get fancy or give them as gifts.

What do you think, will you be giving it a try this year?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Seed Potatoes {Start to Finish}

how to grow potatoes

how to grow potatoes

Yesterday the Girl and I planted 2 bags of seed potatoes in the backyard garden. I’m not sure how many spuds we are going to plant this year, but let me tell you Bob I am excited! The Handsome Husband is Irish, and potatoes are pretty much the only thing he likes to harvest in the garden so I typically grow several different varieties.

If you’ve never grown potatoes before {or just need a little refresher course} here’s how to grow them.

purple potatoes

Brief description:  Potatoes are a starchy edible tuber.

Where to Plant Potatoes:  Plant in deep containers {old garbage cans work great}, potato towers, garden beds, and even raised beds {so long as you have at least 12 inches of depth to work with}.

seed potato chitting

Planting Seeds:  It is best to buy seed potatoes, as grocery story potatoes are usually treated to prevent sprouting–making yields a little unpredictable.  Store your seed potatoes in the fridge until you are ready to plant.  If your seed potatoes are already starting to sprout, plant them whole.

seed potatoes all blue red pontiac

Otherwise, a few days before you plant them, take them out of the fridge and cut them into 2″ chunks or cut into pieces with at least one eye per piece.  Leave them on a paper towel overnight to dry out a bit.  When planting, plant about 10-12″  deep and 10″ apart, then cover with 4″ of soil.  As the potato leaves begin to show, cover with another 4″ of soil.  Repeat the process until you have mounds about 12″ high.

Growing Tips:  Potatoes prefer cooler weather, so plant 2 weeks before the last frost in your area.   Water regularly, potatoes like it moist, but not wet.

how to grow red potatoes

How to Harvest:  When the leaves die and turn brown, it is time to harvest your taters.  Just take a shovel and turn over the dirt.  I like to start nice and wide so that I don’t puncture any of my potatoes.  If you have grown them in a container, lay out a tarp and dump the container.  Sift out your potatoes, and voila, you’re done.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Potato recipes:

baked potato cassaroleBaked Potato Casserole

easy side dish recipes scalloped potatoesHomeStyle Scalloped Potatoes

crock pot baked potatoesCrock Pot Baked Potatoes

Interesting Fact:  In 1845, Ireland’s potato crop was devastated by a fungus.  Until then, the Irish had subsisted largely on potatoes, because they were so easy to grow and required relatively little space considering the yields.  That single fungus put into motion a devastating 10 year famine, known as the Irish Potato Famine.

Potatoes are obviously still a staple to this day, they are the world’s 4th largest crop.  They follow rice, wheat and corn.

Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre – This book rocks!

Mini Farming describes a holistic approach to small-area farming that will show you how to produce 85 percent of an average family’s food on just a quarter acre—and earn $10,000 in cash annually while spending less than half the time that an ordinary job would require.

Even if you have never been a farmer or a gardener, this book covers everything you need to know to get started: buying and saving seeds, starting seedlings, establishing raised beds, soil fertility practices, composting, dealing with pest and disease problems, crop rotation, farm planning, and much more. ~ Amazon

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Peas {Start to Finish}

sugar snap peas

sugar snap pea seed packet

Right before we left for our trip The Girl and I planted our peas. Normally we plant our peas on St. Patrick’s Day but this year we thought we’d try to get a jump start on the growing season and plant them a little early.

garden tips soak peas

This year we planted sugar snap peas, snow peas and green arrow peas.  Sugar snap peas are plump and crunchy and are great for snacking and in stir fry, while snow peas are flat and typically harvested before the pea gets very large.  Green Arrow pea pods are not edible but the peas are perfect for canning and freezing.

sugar snap pea seeds

Where to Plant Peas:  Peas are a cool weather crop.  They need full sun in early spring.  Sugar Snap and Snow peas need a trellis or pole to climb and typically get anywhere from 3-6′ tall {depending on the variety}, so keep that in mind when you choose a location.  Green arrow peas typically do not need to be trellised because they only grow about 2′ tall. They are best grown in raised or garden beds.

sugar snap peas

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1″ deep {every 2″ if you are sowing directly outside}.  You will not need to thin them.

how to gorw sugar snap peas

Growing Tips:   Peas like rich soil with good drainage.  They do not do well in the heat, so plan them as an late spring/early summer harvest.  Provide them with a trellis or pole to climb.

When to pick sugar snap peas

How to Harvest:  To harvest, cut peas off at the top of the pea {hold the other side of the vine so as not to damage it during harvest}.  Do not let them get overripe or they take on a starchy flavor and stop producing.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Pea recipes:

Ranch Pasta Salad with Broccoli, Spinach and Green PeasRanch Pasta Salad with Broccoli, Spinach, and Green Peas

easy summer recipes orzo saladOrzo Salad with Fresh Peas, Carrots, and Pine Nuts

Fresh Pea Salad with Bacon and Chives

Fresh Pea Salad with Bacon and Chives

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Basil {Start to Finish}

fresh-basil

basil seed packets

I started my first batch of basil seeds under grow lights this morning! For the past 2 years I have been pretty successful at growing basil and wanted to share some of my tips and tricks with you. In years past I had simply scattered seeds in the garden and hoped for the best. But two years ago I babied the seeds a bit by starting them under grow lights and then growing the basil in our greenhouse the whole season.

And holy cow what a difference it made. We had more basil than I knew what to do with. Luckily this year I have a ton of new recipes I want to try so I am going all out and planting oodles of seeds. Weeeeeeee!

fresh-basil

Brief description: An annual herb, used in a huge variety of dishes.

garden-basil

Where to Plant Basil:  Plant in raised beds, garden beds, or containers.  In the winter, Basil can be planted indoors and kept in a south-facing window in most climates.  Once outdoors, choose an area with full sun.

Italian Genovese basil

Planting Seeds:  Start indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost.  Plant seeds 1/4″ deep.  Thin to 1 per pot when about 2″ tall.  Basil is VERY sensitive to frost, so don’t transplant too soon.

Growing Tips:  When transplanting outside, mix a little compost into the soil to encourage growth.  Pinch leaves and flowers frequently to encourage regrowth.    Water regularly.

Fresh Italian Basil

How to Harvest:  Pinch off leaves as needed, or cut top 3″ or so off.   It tastes best harvested right before it flowers.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my favorite Basil recipes:

recipe strawberry basil jamStrawberry Basil Jam

baked tomatoes with pine nuts and basilBaked Tomatoes with Pine Nuts and Basil

recipe how to make pestoPesto

Fun Fact:  Basil is part of the mint family {though it hasn’t been to a family reunion in years}.  In Romania, if a boy accepts a basil leaf from a girl, they are engaged–yikes, I better be careful about who I share my crop with!

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How to Care for Orchids

Charmin-Basic-Toilet-Paper


How to Care for Orchids

My local grocery store always carries potted Orchids about this time of year.  Every time I walk in and see them, I have to resist the urge to buy one of each color.  They are soooo cool looking, and purchasing one always makes me think I will be somehow simplifying my life–like all Orchid owners are centered and de-cluttered.  Crazy, I know, but they have that affect on me.

If you have decided to take one home and fen shui your house, here’s a couple basic care tips to make sure you get the most out of your attempts:

orchid-floral-arrangements-

First, you have to try to recreate their natural habitat, the best you can.  Think rain forest.  While you don’t have to run out and get yourself a water mister and monkeys, you do have to consider that Orchids prefer to cling to rocks and/or barks of trees, with their roots exposed to humidity.  So, rule number one, it’s best not to grow your Orchid in dirt. You can actually buy Orchid blends–which include a lot of rough bark.  {Don’t be worried if your Orchids roots are someone exposed outside of your growing medium.}

Next, the pot/container.  Obviously Orchids aren’t grown in pots in the wild, but they do like to cram themselves into the nooks and crannies of trees and rocks, so smaller is better when it comes to choosing a pot.  Choose the smallest pot your Orchid will tolerate and still establish itself.  Also, if possible, clear plastic is best.  It allows you to simulate exposed roots, by exposing the potted roots to light.

mavis-butterfield-one-hundred-dollars-a-month1

Orchids need dappled light–direct afternoon sunlight is a no-no.  They also love to have periods of dry and wet–again, think rain forest.  Let them dry out, and then drench them, to simulate a rain cycle {usually this translates into a weekly watering schedule}.  Meanwhile, you can simulate humidity by misting them with a water bottle–plus you will look like you have botany basically mastered as you mist your plant.

Try to fertilize your Orchid once a year and re-pot it once a year.  After your flowers have disappeared, it is best to trim it back to its base, so nutrients aren’t wasted on growing the spike.  You should get more flowers in a year {if you care for your Orchid properly, you should get the blooms to last a couple of months each year, though, it does depend a bit on the variety too.} and your plant should last for years with this cycle.

How about YOU, any tips on maintaining Orchids?

~Mavis

white-orchid-pink-spots

P.S. Last year I visited the Kew Royal Botanic Gardens and the Denver Botanic Gardens during their orchid exhibits and they were amazing! Be sure and check out those stories for more orchid pictures.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Tips for First Time Gardeners

Tips for First Time Gardeners

Tips for First Time GardenersOne Hundred Dollars a Month reader Claudine recently sent me an email with a question about getting started with gardening, she wrote,

Hi Mavis, do you have a blog post on how to start a garden for the first time? I have a new yard (with grass) but plenty of room and is like to grow some food – but I have no idea where to start. Thanks!

organic fruitsI think I could probably go a million different ways with this question, but the first thing that comes to mind is grow what you will eat.  I know that seems obvious, but it’s not.  I think a lot of times, first time gardeners think that they “have” to have tomatoes, or whatever, in order to be gardening, but when you get right down to it, their family doesn’t even eat that many tomatoes.  So, think about what type of produce you buy most often at the grocery store.

organic romaine lettuce basil chivesIf you find yourself throwing lettuce into the cart every week, that’s the perfect place to start.

organic vegetablesSecond, don’t feel like you have to grow ALL of your produce in order to make a garden worth it.  You may not have the time/space/desire to grow everything your family eats.  Supplementing a few meals with garden fresh produce is still super satisfying.  Unless you go straight homesteader, you will still have to buy your produce—so garden to supplement and enjoy the hobby.  It will take a lot of the pressure off.

raised garden bedsOnce you know what you want to grow, consider your space.  If you have a sunny patch of grass you want to turn into a garden spot, perfect.  You can choose to go all in and make raised garden boxes, or start out by just having designated garden beds.  I find that I “tweak” my garden space every season, after learning from the previous season.

cherry-tomatoesA lot of gardening is like that, actually, something doesn’t do as well as you would have liked, so you move it the next year or you work on improving the soil, etc.  Even after years, my garden is constantly evolving.  And for those of you that don’t have space in your yard, consider container gardening—you can actually grow quite a bit in containers.  Plus, it is easier to control the quality of the soil and drainage.

DIY Potting soil recipeFinally, know your dirt.  If you are going to use the dirt you already have in the backyard, prepare to invest a couple of growing seasons in making it hospitable.  Test your dirt’s pH levels, and then amend it accordingly.  I usually end up buying garden soil every year for some spot in my yard as well as making my own potting soil.  Yes, it seems insane to pay for dirt, but I’m impatient, and want to start growing immediately.  I typically add a little homemade compost to enrich it even more.

zucchini plantAs a final word of encouragement, remember, you can do everything right and still get plants that will die or be poor producers.  This happens to experienced gardeners {read:  me, like all of the time}, so don’t let it discourage you.  Some years are better than others, some variables just can’t be controlled, etc.  Garden on.

Hope this helps you get started,

Mavis

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How to Grow Broccoli From Seed

how-to-plant-broccoli

broccoli

If you plan on growing broccoli this year now is a great time to start your seeds indoors. I like to start mine under grow lights in the office then harden them off right before setting them outside towards the end of March.

This year I’ll be planting 3 varieties of broccoli:

Brief description:  Broccoli is a cool weather green vegetable that’s super easy to grow.  It is a member of the cabbage family and is chocked full of nutrients.  I love it because it’s one of those crops you get to plant twice a year–in spring and again in fall. I mainly grow it for my daughter and husband.

brocolli raab seeds

Where to Plant Broccoli:  Plant broccoli in full sun in cooler weather, and partial sun in hotter weather.  Plant in raised beds, garden beds and/or containers. {I’ve always planted my broccoli in raised garden beds by one of my friends grows her broccoli in a large pot on her deck.

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/8″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 18″ {or one per pot} when seedlings are about 2″ tall.  Transplant outdoors when weather has cooled.

seattle garden blog broccoliGrowing Tips:   Plant in fertile soil and water regularly–avoid getting developing heads wet, though.  You can fertilize 3 weeks after transplanting for bigger yields but I’m more of a set it and forget it kind of gal. If you’ve got good soil, you can grow practically anything.

head of broccoli

How to Harvest:  Harvest when main head gets to be about 3″ in diameter, this will encourage the side shoots to grow.

harvesting broccoli

The side shoots will not get as big as the main head but they are just as delicious and can be eaten raw, steamed or in {my favorite} stir fry dishes and salads. regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to my handy dandy chart that’s broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Broccoli recipes:

Creamy Broccoli and Spinach Pasta Salad  recipe
Creamy Broccoli and Spinach Pasta Salad

Broccoli-Cranberry-and-Almond-Salad-with-Feta

Broccoli Cranberry and Almond Salad with Feta Salad

Roasted Broccoli Parmesan

Roasted Broccoli Parmesan

Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage and Broccoli
Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage 

quiche broccoli cheddar

Broccoli, Bacon, Cheddar Quiche

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Rhubarb {Start to Finish}

garden glove dirt

how to grow rhubarb

I was at my local farm and garden store yesterday and spotted RHUBARB CROWNS!! You know what this means right? It’s almost time to get busy gardening people! Wahooooo.

If you have never grown rhubarb before, it’s super easy. In fact it’s so easy it’s one of my favorite things to grow. And it looks cool too, which is like a little added bonus if you ask me.

Here are some helpful tips on how to grow rhubarb:

Brief description: Rhubarb is a cool season, perennial crop and typically grows between May – September.  Once planted, rhubarb plants may remain productive for up to 10 -15 years.

rhubarb crownsWhere to Plant : Plant rhubarb in well drained soil that has been enriched with high organic matter {I use chicken fertilizer}. You should give each plant at least 1 yard of space {in all directions} to grow.

rhubarbPlanting Rhubarb Crowns: Cover the crowns with 2 inches of soil. If you plant rhubarb crowns too deep, it could delay production. Press the soil firmly around the roots and give it a drink. 

how to grow rhubarb

How to Harvest: Rhubarb stalks should not be harvested the first year. For best results, only harvest a few stalks the second year and by the third year you can harvest as much as you need.

rhubarbTo harvest rhubarb, cut the stalk at the soil line. You can cut all  stalks at one time, or harvest them as you need them. Once the rhubarb plant starts producing slender stalks, that is your cue that nutrient reserves for the plant are low and you need to stop harvesting.

how-to-harvest-rhubarb-mavis

My Favorite Rhubarb Recipes:

Rhubarb Cinnamon Jam

Vegetarian-Indian-Spiced-Lentils-with-Spinach-and-Rhubarb-recipeSlow Cooker Vegetarian Indian-Spiced Lentils with Spinach and Rhubarb

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Onions – Start to Finish

onion transplants

botanical interests seed packets yellow granex onion

Yesterday I planted a  packet of Yellow Granex Onion seeds and thought I would repost this little how to grow onions tutorial for those of you have never grow your own onions from seed before. Not only are growing your own onions super easy to do, if you plant them now they should be ready around the same time your tomatoes are ready to harvest.  And you know what that means right?

Homemade Salsa and Heirloom Tomato Sauce baby!

onion seeds picture

Brief description: The Yellow Granex Onion is mild, sweet, and great for storing {also known as Vidalia Onion}. If you are from Washington State, and like Walla Walla Sweet onions, my dad told me these taste just like them.

Where to Plant Onions:  They thrive in warmer climates with 12 hours of sunlight. Onions can be sown directly outside starting in late fall for a late spring harvest. Or started indoors in early January {like I’m doing} and transplanted outside in early spring when the weather warms up. Onions do well in a sunny location/raised beds/or even a greenhouse.

yellow granex onion

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/4″ to 1/2″ deep, with 2 seeds every 4 inches apart.

onion transplants

Growing Tips:  Water throughout growing season, including winter.  Onions can withstand a freeze if they are sufficiently hydrated.

How to Harvest:  Harvest when their necks feel soft and/or the tops have fallen over. When 50% of the tops have fallen over and are lying on the ground, go ninja and knock the rest over. Then about a week or two later when much of the foliage has dried, carefully dig the onions out and dry them in the garden in the sun for a couple of days.

After drying, remove the roots, clip the stems so you are leaving about 1″ of the neck.

Have you ever thought about storing your onions in pantyhose? All the cool people are doing it! Go HERE to learn how.


Favorite Recipes with Onions – 

French Onion Soup – Perfect for chilly winter nights.

Favorite recipes with onions 

Rainbow Salsa – Homemade salsa is the best stuff on earth.

Will YOU be growing onions this year? Do you have a favorite variety? Do tell!

~Mavis

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How to Make Your Poinsettias Last Longer

the legend of the poinsettia

How to Make Your Poinsettias Last Longer

If you have never taken the time to look up how to care for poinsettias {please imagine me raising my hand here}, here’s a quick and dirty guide to making them last much longer–maybe those pretty pink, red, and yellow leaves can actually sustain you through the long dreary lifeless winter. Ha!

Poinsettia Care Basics:

  1. Make sure to start with healthy plants.  Pick the best out of the bunch.  Look for full leaves and deep colors.
  2. Keep your poinsettias in a warm spot {not too warm, though}.  If you set them next to the door, watch out for repeated cold drafts.  They are not huge fans of temperatures below 50 degrees {we have that in common}.  They are happy to be in a cooler spot {between 55-65 at night, so don’t worry if you drop your temperature at night}
  3. Watering.  Allow your plants to drain {you may want to punch additional holes in the bottom of your container}.  Poinsettias are like tomatoes, they do not like wet feet.  Water thoroughly when pot looks dry.  {You’ll know if you are overwatering because the leaves will turn yellow and fall off}
  4. Poinsettias do best in bright, indirect light.  {Seems like an oxymoron, I know, but keep them in a well-lit room, away from the window}
  5. If you really want them to last {6-8 weeks or so}, you may want to consider fertilizing them after they bloom.  {Little tip:  the colored red, pink, etc. parts are actually the leaves.  The flower is typically compact and green.}

With a little care, you can get the most out of your poinsettias–maybe pacify you until the Valentine’s Day Chocolates roll around?  Ha.

*** Did you know the Aztecs used Poinsettia sap to cure fevers and the red leaves {called bracts} to create red dye?  Yep.  I would not lie about such a useful bit of information. They didn’t really become a popular Christmas decoration until the 19th century when a U.S. Mexican Ambassador brought them back to the states.  They bloom in December, so they were an ideal choice for the holidays.

the legend of the poinsettia

Need something a little different to read with the kiddos this Holiday Season?  Try The Legend of the Poinsettia

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How to Plant Tulip Bulbs

How to plant tulip bulbs tulips

How to plant tulip bulbs tulips

Every spring when my tulips poke through, I am always super happy that I took the time to plant them. They are like a pretty little reminder that winter can’t last forever.

If you plant on planting tulip bulbs this year, here’s a few tips to get you started:

You want to plant tulips about 6 weeks before the first hard ground freeze {heavy frost}.  You can find that date HERE.  First things first:  picking out bulbs.  Make sure to pick plump healthy bulbs.  Soft, shriveled bulbs are a crap shoot–potentially rotten inside with no promise of flowering.

tulip bulbs

Second, dig a hole that is approximately 2-3 times the height of the bulb.  Put the bulb in the hole pointed side up, root side down and cover it with dirt.

parrot tulips

You do not need to water the bulbs, in fact, you shouldn’t.  If they sit in water, they could rot before they have a chance to bloom.  Over the winter, they will receive all of the water they need naturally from the elements.

Basically, they are a super hardy and forgiving plant.  They require planting and then sheer neglect. Ah, if only all relationships could be so simple!

Will you be planting any tulips this fall?

~Mavis

 

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How to Harvest and Store Garlic

elephant garlic bulb

How to Harvest and Store Garlic

We recently harvested our garlic and knowing when to harvest garlic can sometimes be a wee bit tricky, so I thought I ‘d share what I’ve learned over the years.

It depends on what type you grow {hardneck or softneck}, and unfortunately, you kind of have to go by how it looks.  Hardneck varieties, which is what we typically grow here in the northwest {because they are more tolerant of the winters}, are usually ready somewhere between early July through August.

How to Harvest and Store Garlic

I typically harvest mine when the bottom 5 leaves or so have turned brown, and the top ones are still green.

elephant garlic bulb

To harvest garlic, carefully dig around the bulb with a small garden shovel.  Even though it’s super tempting, don’t pull garlic out like a weed.  The bulb is fragile, and needs all its pieces intact to cure properly for storage.  Once you have dug around the bulb, carefully lift it out of the dirt and brush off the excess dirt.

braided garlic

To cure garlic, hang it to dry in a cool dark place.  A garage or tool shed works great.  Don’t remove the stalk or the roots when curing.  If you want to, about a week into the drying process, you can braid the stalks together for storage.  It takes about two weeks total to dry completely.

After you have cured your garlic, you can prep it for storage.  If you didn’t braid it, you can cut off the roots and stalks now.    Garlic stores best in a cool dark place {but not the refrigerator—it’s the optimal temperature for causing garlic to get those little green shoots}.  I recommend storing it in the pantry {or a basement, if there’s no humidity} in a brown paper bag with holes punched into it for circulation.

Softneck varieties store longer than hardneck.  Either way, you  should be able to get your garlic to store fairly well for 6 months or longer.

Did you grow garlic this year? Can you taste the homegrown difference?

~Mavis

Looking for more information in growing, cultivating and enjoying garlic?  Check out the book The Complete Book of Garlic By Ted Jordan Meredith.  Amazon currently has it in stock and ready to ship.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Parsnips {Start to Finish}

parsnip seeds

parsnip seed packet

I planted my parsnip seeds last night so that they will be ready by Thanksgiving.  The awesome thing about them is that they actually taste better after a freeze, so you can keep them in the ground until you’re ready to eat them.  If you haven’t ever tried them, I seriously recommend it–they have a taste somewhere between a carrot and a potato, but don’t pack the same carbohydrate punch.

parsnip seeds

Brief description: Parsnips are a root vegetable, and a cousin to the carrot family {Though they hardly speak at family reunions.  Ha.}

Where to Plant Parsnips:  Raised beds or garden beds in loose soil.  They prefer full sun, but will also grow in part shade, just with lower yields.

Planting Seeds:  Soak seeds in water for 12-24 hours prior to planting.  Plant seeds 1/2″ deep every 3″.  Parsnips are ridiculously SLOW to germinate, so don’t be surprised if you don’t see anything for at least two weeks.  Loosen the soil all around the planting site.

soak parsnip seeds

Growing Tips:  The hardest part about growing parsnips is actually getting them started.  They are the one thing {well, there’s probably others, but off the top of my head I can’t think of them} that you need to get fresh seeds for every year.  The seeds just do not store well, and the number one reason most people struggle to grow them is because their seeds are not fresh.  For best taste, allow them to stay in the ground through the first hard freeze.  The freeze will turn the starches into sugar, creating a yummy little treat.  Parsnips will also over-winter really well, if you cover the leaves with soil and then top that off with a healthy layer of hay or straw.  It’s a great way to get root veggies through the sparse spring months.

parsnips

How to Harvest:  Harvest parsnips much like you would potatoes.  Dig them up with a shovel, being careful not to puncture them or destroy their roots.  Because they store well in the ground, just dig them up as needed, leaving the rest for when you want them again.  Parsnips are ready to harvest somewhere between 95-120 days, depending on the variety you choose.

Fun Facts about Parsnips:  

  • In Scotland, parsnips are called white carrots.
  • Parsnips date as far back as Roman times and were thought to be an aphrodisiac.
  • Before the arrival of potatoes to the new world, parsnips were a staple, along with other root vegetables.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Pumpkins {Start to Finish}

pumpkin seeds botanical interests

How to grow pumpkins

Are you growing pumpkins this year? I’m hoping for a bumper crop to help towards my goal of growing 2 tons of fruits and vegetables in my backyard. The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird loves to grow them for her friends and I love to grow pumpkins for decorating the front porch with.

Pumpkins are super easy to grow, just remember you need about 90- 100 days of warm weather to  grow them. We typically harvest ours around mid October.

heirloom pumpkin pictures

Brief description:  Pumpkins are part of the gourd like squash plant.  Depending on the variety, it can be used for tons of things from jack-o-lanterns to pies.

Where to Plant :  Plant pumpkins in a sunny location with good soil.  Pumpkins need a bit of space, so a garden bed works best.

pumpkin seeds botanical interests

Planting Seeds:  Mound surrounding dirt into little hills and plant 3 seeds, about 1 inch deep per hill.  Even though most seed packets say to space pumpkins 4-6 feet apart, I have always spaced them about 3 feet and never had a problem with crowding.  Make sure to place a plant marker right next to where you plant so you know where to water until seedlings emerge.  Once seedlings pop through the soil, you will need to thin them with scissors, leaving only the strongest one per mound.

grow your own pumpkins

Growing Tips:   If you have the space, I totally recommend growing a variety of different pumpkins.  They are super easy to grow and basically just need sun and water.  Plus, kids love them, so they are a great way to get them involved in gardening.

mavis picking pumpkins

How to Harvest:   Cut or twist pumpkin off of the vine, leaving enough of the vine for a stem.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Pumpkin recipes:

Thanksgiving Dessert recipes Individual Pumpkin PiesIndividual Pumpkin Pies

Pumpkin Muffin recipePumpkin Muffins with Oatmeal Streusel Topping

Spiced Pumpkin Seeds recipeRoasted Pumpkin Seeds

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Zucchini {Start to Finish}

zucchini seeds botanical interests

how to grow zucchini

Is it just me or does everyone and their brother start locking their doors around mid-summer because people are trying to sneak sacks of zucchini in peoples cars? I hear church parking lots are a prime spot for this sort of activity.

Brief description:  Zucchini is a summer squash.  It provides awesome yields and can be used in tons of different dishes or stand alone.

Where to Plant Zucchini:  Plant in garden beds, raised beds and/or containers.

zucchini seeds botanical interests

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/2″-1″ deep 2-4 weeks after last frost.  Make sure soil temperatures are above 60 degrees.

Growing Tips:  Zucchini is a warm weather crop.  It prefers full sun to partial shade.  Plant with plenty of quality compost.  When watering zucchini, be careful not to water the leaves, it will prevent a lot of potential problems down the road {i.e. powdery mildew and bacterial wilt}.

black beauty zucchini

How to Harvest:  Harvest when fruit is about 4″ or longer–though letting them get too big can cause them to taste a little woody and tough.  Frequent harvesting will encourage new growth.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Zucchini recipes:

easy zucchini recipes baked friesBaked Zucchini Fries

Easy Brunch Recipes - Fried Potatoes with Peppers and Zucchini Fried Potatoes with Peppers and Zucchini

vegan zucchini bread recipeVegan Zucchini Bread w/ Chocolate Chips

Fun Fact:  A zucchini has more potassium than a banana.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Cumin {Start to Finish}

how to grow cumin seeds

cumin flowerPhoto Credit

This will be my first year growing cumin and I’m pretty excited. I don’t know about you but I absolutely LOVE cooking with cumin. Yum Yum!

Brief description:  Cumin is an herb grown for the seeds.  It adds a unique flavor to Indian and Mexican dishes.

Where to Plant Cumin:  Plant in full sun in containers, garden beds or raised beds.

how to grow cumin seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/4″ deep.  When seedlings are 1″ tall, thin to 1 plant every 4″-6″.

Growing Tips:   Cumin requires a pretty long growing season, so if you live in an area with a short growing season, you will want to start them indoors.  Transplant outdoors when temperature LOWS reach 60 degrees.

How to Harvest:  Let seed pods ripen and turn brown. Remove the pods and let them dry.  Then, rub pods to remove the seeds. You can also cut entire stems and place them upside down in a bag to collect the seeds.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here is my Favorite Cumin recipe:

Chickpea Salad with Cumin and LimeChickpea Salad with Cumin and Lime

Fact:  Cumin is the second most popular spice in the world, next to black pepper.  It is essential to curries, and dates back as far as 4000 years.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Fenugreek Sprouts {Start to Finish}

seed sprouter

fenugreek seeds botanical interests

Do you grow your own sprouts? My online boyfriend Ryan from Botanical Interests Seed Company asked me if I had tried fenugreek sprouts before {I hadn’t} so I decided to give them a try. The verdict? Delicious!

Have you tried them?

Brief description:  Fenugreek is a legume typically used as a spice.  When sprouted it provides high levels of vitamins, flavonoids, and antioxidants.

Where to Plant Fenugreek Sprouts:  In glass jars or sprouters indoors.  Keep out of direct sunlight, and make sure you keep them in a place with good air circulation.

victorio seed sprouter tray

Planting Seeds:  Fenugreek seeds must be disinfected and soaked prior to sprouting in order to minimize potential E. Coli.  To do this, simply soak in 1 tsp. bleach to 1 cup hot tap water for 15 minutes.  Then, rinse thoroughly.

I use a Victorio 4 Tray Kitchen Sprouter, but you could also use a canning jar to sprout.  Once you have disinfected seeds, soak them in plain old tap water for 6 hours.  This softens the exterior of the fenugreek seed.  Finally, spread your seeds out in the sprouter trays {or in the bottom of your jar}.  Fill the top tray with 2 cups of water and wait for it to trickle through.  Repeat the process every 12 hours using fresh water.  For a jar, rinse seeds and drain completely every 3-4 hours.

grow your own sprouts

Growing Tips:  Once sprouts are ready to eat, you can slow down their growth by placing them in the fridge, giving you a longer time to enjoy them.  Also, make sure during the rinsing process, you don’t let your seeds dry out completely–it will make them very angry.

How to Harvest:  When sprouts are ready, you simply rinse and eat the whole thing.  Fenugreek sprouts are best eaten before green leaves appear, though.

Cool Fact: Fenugreek is a widely used spice in India, especially in curries.  Fenugreek sprouts have an equally desirable flavor, with all of the nutritional benefits.

seed sprouter botanical interests

Because I’m all pumped up about sprouts these days, I just ordered the new Botanical Interest Seed Sprouter. I like the design of this one a little better than the one I have right now, plus it has 4 see through compartments which I think is pretty cool as well.

I’ll let you know what I think about it once I get it and try it out.

Peace Out Girl Scouts.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Poppy Flowers {Start to Finish}

poppy seed packets

poppy seed packets

I don’t know about you, but I love poppy flowers and I just can’t get enough of them. This year I planted 3 varieties:

Brief description: Poppy flowers are absolutely gorgeous.  They are very heat and drought tolerant, so they require almost no care {yay!}.  They are technically an annual, but have been known to overwinter, even in colder climates.

Where to Plant Poppy Seeds:  Plant in raised beds, garden beds, and borders in full sun to part shade.

poppy seeds

Planting Seeds:   Start seeds outdoors 4 weeks before average last frost.  To sow, scatter seeds and then gently rake them in.

Growing Tips:   Deadhead fading flowers to encourage new growth throughout the summer {unless you plan on harvesting your poppy seeds for later use}.


red poppy picture poppies{photo credit}

How to Harvest:  To make poppy flowers last longer in a vase, cut them and burn the poppy stems.  Since their stems bleed a milky substance the second you pluck them, poppies quickly wilt if the ends aren’t sealed. Burn the cut stem ends immediately with a lighter, match or candle, then plunge them into cool water for a lasting display well worth the work.

Facts about Poppies:  Poppies are a narcotic. They are used to make Codeine, Morphine, and Opium.  Poppy seeds are also a treat to many birds, so if you choose to let your flowers dry out and harvest the seeds, try mixing them in with your bird seed.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Asparagus {Start to Finish}

asparagus crowns

how to grow asparagus

If you are thinking about growing asparagus, early spring is the time to do it. I was at my local nursery yesterday and spotted asparagus crowns selling for $1.99 each. They are a little pricey up front, but asparagus season lasts 6- 8 weeks and a well maintained asparagus bed can last up to 20 years.

Brief description: Asparagus perennial spring vegetable and is typically harvested between March and June taking 3 to 4 years to produce once you’ve planted the crowns.

Where to Plant Asparagus: Asparagus prefers full sun and can be grown practically anywhere. It does best in light soil with good drainage.

asparagus crowns

How to Plant Asparagus:

  • Dig a trench 12″ wide by 6″ deep
  • Mound soil in the center of the trench and place crowns on top
  • Space crowns 12″- 18″  apart, in rows 4′ apart
  • Back fill trench with soil, covering crowns with 2″ of soil
  •  Add soil every once in a while until the soil is slightly mounded around the base of the plant.

How to Harvest: Asparagus can be harvested for 6 to 8 weeks during spring. To harvest snap the asparagus when it reaches about 8 to 10 inches above the soil line {before the buds have opened}.

Once the asparagus starts to slow down and is not producing as well, stop harvesting.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my favorite asparagus recipes

Asparagus with Balsamic-Butter SauceAsparagus with Balsamic-Butter Sauce

grilled-asparagus-with-pine-nuts-recipeGrilled Asparagus With Pine Nuts

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Alyssum {Start to Finish}

alyssum

alyssum
{photo credit}

I don’t know when I first fell in love with alyssum, but I absolutely love using purple and white alyssum in my window box and hanging flower baskets every year. It’s delicate, yet very hearty.

Brief description:  Alyssum is a delicate mounding or trailing flower {depending on variety} that blooms throughout the summer.

Where to Plant Alyssum:  Alyssum can be planted nearly anywhere, but make great border flowers, thrive in rock beds, and in containers where they can trail over the sides.  They do best in sun to light shade.

alyssum

Planting Seeds:  To plant seeds, just press them into the surface of the soil.  Put a pinch of seeds in every pot, approximately 6″ apart.  There is not need to thin these clumping flowers.

Growing Tips:  Alyssum can stand quite a bit of abuse.  They are drought tolerant and deer resistant.  For best results, though, water 2 times per week during hotter months.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Fun Fact:  While Alyssum is typically an annual, they will overwinter in some climates, popping up sporadically year after year.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Celery {Start to Finish}

what do celery seeds look like

celery seeds

I started some celery seeds under grow lights a while back, and yesterday I transplanted the young plants out  to the garden. As long as you keep your celery plants watered, it’s about as low maintenance as it gets. Celery seems to thrive up here in the Northwest because of our cool spring and fall temperatures and it especially LOVES growing in my shady backyard.

Brief description: Celery is a versatile little veggie.  You can eat the stalks, leaves, roots and seeds.

Where to Plant  Celery:  Celery does best in a cooler climates out of direct sunlight.  It is a great choice for shadier areas of your yard {though, it still needs some light}.  You can grow it in garden beds, raised beds, or containers.

what do celery seeds look like

Planting Seeds:  Press seeds into the surface of the dirt.  Thin to 1 seedling per pot {or every 6″} when they are 1″ tall.  When plants are about 6″ tall, harden them off before planting.

celery

Growing Tips:  Celery likes fertile well-watered areas and does not tolerate the heat very well.  In the south, it can be grown all winter.  In the far north, it thrives in the spring.  In most other areas, it really thrives as a fall crop.

How to Harvest:  Cut the stalks off just above the soil line.  You can also harvest single stalks, if that is all your recipe calls for.

regional-planting-guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Storage Tip:  To store a fall crop of celery, pull plant up root and all, and store in a box with moist sand or dirt completely surrounding the roots.  They should keep several months this way.

chicken noodle soup crock pot recipes{Crock Pot Chicken Noodle Soup}

Besides eating celery stalks dipped in peanut butter {Yum!} my favorite way to enjoy it is in homemade chicken noodle soup. Mmm Mmm Good!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Kohlrabi {Start to Finish}

Kohlrabi

botanical interests kohlrabi seeds purple and white

Have you ever tried kohlrabi? It’s kind of funky. I planted our kohlrabi seeds a few days ago and even though it’s one of the vegetables your only likely to find at a farmers market, you should give it a try. Especially if you have kids.

Brief description: Kohlrabi is part of the cabbage family.  It is very hardy and has a very mild sweet flavor and is great in anything you would put cabbage in.

what do kohlrabi seeds look like

Where to Plant Kohlrabi:  Plant in full sun.    It is a cooler weather plant, and thrives in 40-65 degree weather.  It is best in raised beds and garden beds.  Because of its root system, it does not do well in containers.

Kohlrabi

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/4-1/2″ deep.  Thin seedlings to one per pot or 1 every 4″ when they reach 4″ tall.

Growing Tips:  Kohlrabi does best with consistent even watering.  Mix compost in when you transplant outside  and add another bit of compost around the plant mid-season.

giant-kohlrabi-puyallup-fair-pictures

How to Harvest:  Harvest when bulb reaches 2-3″ in diameter–any bigger and flavor is negatively affected.

regional planting guides

What part do you eat?  The most common part of Kohlrabi is the bulb.  It can be sliced and diced like cabbage for coleslaw, stir-fries, salads, etc.  You can also eat the stems–chop them up into 1″ segments and steam, boil, saute them.  A lot of people think the stems taste like broccoli.  The leaves can also be eaten.  They can be sauteed like spinach.

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Carrots {Start to Finish}

what do carrot seeds look like

rainbow carrots seed packets

I think carrots are hands down one of the easiest vegetables to grow {zucchini and peas are at the top of the list too}. This year I’ll be growing 3 different kinds of carrots:

Brief description:  Carrots are a root vegetable.  They have a sweet mild flavor.  They are super easy to grow–and once you’ve had homegrown carrots, it will be tough to go back.

Where to Plant Carrots:   Plant in raised beds and garden beds. I plant mine in a garden box that is about 12 inches deep.

what do carrot seeds look like

Planting Seeds:  Sow outside 2-4 weeks before last frost.  You can sow them every couple of weeks for a continuous crop, but stop about 2 months before the first expected frost.  Sow seeds about 1/4″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 3″ when seedlings reach about 1″ tall.

Growing Tips:   Carrots prefer loose, well-composted soil.  Don’t allow young carrots to dry out, consistent watering will provide the best growth and limit cracking.

rainbow-carrots

How to Harvest:  Don’t allow carrots to get too big.  Check your seed packet for full grown length, and harvest by loosing the surrounding soil and pulling the carrots out by hand.  Digging them up sometimes results in damaged carrots.  Carrots actually get sweetest after a light frost.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Carrot recipes:

chicken and thyme rice with carrotsChicken and Thyme Rice with Carrots

the best moist carrot cake recipeCarrot Cake 

carrot cake jam recipe canning

Carrot Cake Jam

Fun Fact:  In the 16th century, Dutch carrot growers invented the orange carrot in honor of the House of Orange, the Dutch Royal Family. They created the carrots by cross breeding pale yellow carrots with red carrots.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Bok Choy {Start to Finish}

bok choy seed packet

bok choy seed packet

I planted a flat of Toy Bok Choy seeds last week. Have you ever tried bok choy before?

We love to chop it up and add it to stir fry. My daughter likes the smaller variety of bok choy better better than the giant leave you typically find in the grocery stores so that’s why we grow the toy bok choy. It can be harder to find, and when you do it’s typically in  a specialty market and they want to charge an arm and a leg for it.

Here is how to be cool and grow your own.

what do bok choy seeds look like

Brief description:  Bok Choy is also called Chinese Cabbage.  It is a sweet, mild flavor.  Young leaves can be eaten in salads, or stems are great for stir-fries, etc.

Where to Plant Bok Choy:   Plant in raised beds, garden beds or containers.

bok choy

Planting Seeds:   Sow outside 4-6 weeks before average last frost.  Plant seeds 1/4″-1/2″ deep and thin to one every 6″ when seedlings are 4″ tall.

Growing Tips:   Bok Choy is a cool weather crop.  It does best in loose soil.  Keep Bok Choy beds well-weeded.

heirloom bok choy, Rainbow swiss chard, kale

How to Harvest:  Harvest young leaves as needed.  To harvest entire plant, cut the entire head even with the soil.

Preparation Tip:  Don’t wash Bok Choy until you are ready to eat it.  By not washing it, you can extend its fridge-life up to 6 days.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Spinach {Start to Finish}

spinach seed packet

what do spinach seeds look like

I started some spinach seeds last week in the greenhouse gutters and I am anxiously waiting for them to pop through the soil. I thin that’s the hardest part about gardening if you ask me. Waiting.  Spinach is pretty easy to grow, and you can grown an incredible amount from just a tiny packet of seeds. I like the Monstrueux de Viroflay variety for it’s big, fat leaves.

spinach grown in gutters

Brief description:  Spinach is a cold-hardy leafy green.

Where to Plant Spinach:  Raised beds, garden beds, or containers.

spinach

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/2″  deep.  Thin to 2″-6″ apart when seedlings are 1″ tall.  Plant 4-6 weeks before the last frost.   You can sow seeds every 3 weeks to get a continuous crop.

Growing Tips:  Spinach forms fairly deep roots and will do best if you loosen soil up to 1 foot deep all around your planting area.  To get a crop to grow throughout the summer, sow spinach in the shade of larger plants, such as corn or beans.

homegrown spinach

How to Harvest:  Pick individual leaves from outer part of the plant or cut the whole plant down at the base.

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Spinach recipes:

Ranch Pasta Salad with Broccoli, Spinach and Green Peas
Ranch Pasta Salad w/ Broccoli, Spinach, and Green Peas

recipe grilled chicken kabobs with spinach quinoa
Grilled Chicken Kabobs with Spinach Quinoa

Recipe Strawberry and Spinach Salad
Strawberry and Spinach Salad

Fun Fact:  Remember Popeye?  Spinach growers in the 1930’s attributed a 33% percent boost in spinach sales because of Popeye’s popularity. Go.Fight.Win.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Broccoli {Start to Finish}

can you grow broccoli in winter

mavis butterfield broccoli

This year we planted 3 varieties of broccoli:

Broccoli is a cool season vegetable and it is super hardy. I like to plant broccoli in both the early spring and again in the fall.

Where to Plant Broccoli:  Plant in full sun {though it will germinate in temperatures as low as 40 degrees.  It can be planted in raised beds, containers or garden beds.

how to plant broccoli

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/8″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 18″ {or one per pot} when seedlings are about 2″ tall.

Growing Tips:  Plant in fertile soil and water regularly–avoid getting developing heads wet, though.  You can fertilize 3 weeks after transplanting for bigger yields.

broccoli

How to Harvest:  Harvest when main head gets to be about 3″ in diameter, that will encourage side shoots to grow.

Little Known Fact:  The average American eats 4 lbs of broccoli per year. No freakin’ way!

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Broccoli recipes

Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage and Broccoli
Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage 

quiche broccoli cheddar

Broccoli, Bacon, Cheddar Quiche

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Radishes {Start to Finish}

radish seeds botanical interests

radish seeds botanical interests

This morning Lucy and I went out to the garden and planted 5 different kinds of radishes. Last year was my first year growing the French Breakfast Radish and it was so good, I decided to expand my radish crop this year and plant some unusual varieties.

Here are the 5 different kinds of radishes I am planting this year:

If you have never grown radishes before, I promise you, they are super easy to grow.

what do radish seeds look like

Brief description:  Radishes are a quick-growing hardy vegetable with a crisp mild flavor.

Where to Plant Radish:  Radishes can be planted in raised beds, garden beds and containers.

how to plant radish seeds

Planting Seeds:  Sow seeds 1/2″ deep.  When foliage appears, thin to 1″ apart.  Radishes are best planted with cucumbers, spinach and squash to repel as they repel unwanted insects.

french breakfast radish

Growing Tips:  Radishes prefer cooler weather.  You can sow them outside 4-6 weeks before the last frost, and sow more every 5-10 days for a continuous crop.  You can sow them again in the late summer for a fall crop.  Water regularly.

Crimson Radish picture

How to Harvest:  Harvest radishes when they are small {1-1/2 to 2″}.  If you let them get much larger, they start to split and taste a wee bit tough.

Radishes’ Literary Debut:  In the novel, Gone with the Wind, it was a radish that starving Scarlett O’Hara eats {the only food she can get}, and then declares, “As God is my witness, I’ll never be hungry again.”

regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.