Canning 101 – Lilac Blossom Jelly

lilac jamI love when readers send in their canning recipes! The last recipe Susan submitted for Canned Pickled Dill Carrots was a super hit, so I was pretty excited when she submitted another one. This time, she’s using lilacs to make jelly, which is a first for me. I’m so excited to try it out. Here’s what Susan had to say:

Hi Mavis!

My lilacs are blooming, so I decided to make this Lilac Jelly. I will be using these for gifts – kind of a “gourmet” item. I hope to make another batch before my flowers “rust” and are gone.

Ingredients

2 cups lilac blossoms, no leaves or stems
2 1/2 cups boiling water
2 drops purple food coloring, OPTIONAL {the color of the jelly will be a golden/yellow otherwise. I add the coloring for aesthetic appeal.}
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon butter {for less foaming}
4 cups sugar
One box powdered pectin

Directions

Place the blossoms in a glass bowl and pour the boiling water on them. Let this steep on the counter overnight {or approximately 8 hours}. Strain the flowers out of the water. Squeeze dry, adding the liquid into what you already have. You should have roughly 2 1/4 cups infused water. Add more water if needed.

Place the flower infusion, lemon juice, butter and pectin in a large heavy bottomed pot. Bring to a boil. Add sugar all at once. Return to boil. Boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Ladle jelly into clean, sterilized jars, leaving 1/4″ head space. Wipe rims and screw on the lids. Process for 10 minutes in a water bath canner.

Makes 5 half pint jars {5 cups}

Susan :)

Thanks for sharing another great recipe, Susan!

Thanks so much for sharing Susan. They look so pretty and sound delicious!

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Canning 101 – Pickled Dill Carrots

pickled carrots

I recently got an email from reader, Susan, about pickled carrots. They looked so amazing I emailed her right back and asked for her recipe. She was gracious enough to share it. Here’s what she had to say:

Mavis- I hear you on the itching to can! I was recently at Chuck’s Produce {best store in the world!} where they had these gorgeous Organic Carrots for .50 bunch! After removing the tops, they weighed 1 – 1 1/4 lb. each!

I got 7 jars of Pickled Carrots from these carrots. I went back and got 4 more bunches the next day = 14 jars.

car

Ingredients

4 lbs carrots, ends cut off and peeled, cut into sticks
6 cups white vinegar
2 cups water
1/2 cup pickling or canning salt
7 cloves of garlic
7 1/2 teaspoons of dill seed or fresh dill heads {be sure to get dill “seed” and not “weed”}
7 pinches of red pepper flakes

Directions

In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine vinegar, water and salt. Stir, boil over medium-high heat and stir again to dissolve salt. This is the brine.

Put 1 clove of garlic, 1/2 teaspoon of dill seed {or fresh dill} and a pinch of red pepper flakes into each sterilized hot jar.

Pack carrot sticks into hot jars to within a generous 1/2 ” to the top of the jar. Ladle hot liquid into jar to cover carrots – leaving 1/2 ” headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace by adding more pickling liquid if necessary. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Screw on band.

Place jars in hot water bath canner. Be sure they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil. Process 10 minutes.

I like to use the 12 oz tall quilted jars for these. I just like the way they look in them. :)

~Susan

Thanks so much for sharing Susan. They look so pretty and sound delicious!

jam recipesLooking for a few more canning recipes?

Search my Full List of Canning Recipes

Want to start canning, but don’t know where to start?  Here’s a guide to help you get started.

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Blueberry Lemon Jam

blueberry lemon jam recipe

Clearly, January is not blueberry season. But, if you are a frugalicious homemaker like me, you probably have a boatload of blueberries tucked away in your freezer from last summer. No berries? No problem. Just stop by Costco the next time you’re out and grab a giant bag of frozen blueberries. This recipe for blueberry lemon jam rocks anytime of the year.

blueberry lemon jam recipe

Ingredients

3 pound blueberries {I thawed mine overnight in the fridge}
2 pounds granulated sugar
1 cup lemon juice
1 cinnamon stick

blueberry jam

Directions

Bring a boiling-water canner, 3/4 full with water, to simmer. Wash jars {I used both Weck and Ball canning jars} and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.

Combine the blueberries, sugar, cinnamon stick and lemon juice in a 5-quart nonreactive pan. Cover and bring to a boil then reduce the heat a fast simmer and cook uncovered, for 10-15 minutes stirring frequently.

Test to see if it has “set” by spooning a bit onto a cold plate.  If it has formed a bit of a skin and started to give a bit like goopy jell-o, you’re good to go, if not, cook for a bit longer.

When jam is ready, remove the cinnamon stick and ladle immediately into prepared jars, filling to within 1/4 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands on {see how to use Weck jars}. Place jars on elevated rack in a canner. Lower rack into canner. {Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.}

canning blueberry jam

Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 10 min. Remove jars and place upright on towel to cool completely. After the jars have cooled, check the seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary. Yields about {8} 1/2 pints.

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Cranberry Orange Marmalade

cranberry orange marmalade

Now I don’t want to scare you off, but this was the most time consuming recipe I have ever made. The process took 3 days. And it was totally worth every spoonful of marmalade it produced. I had intended to give most of it away as Christmas gifts, but it was so good, and it took so long, that I ended up hoarding most of it for ME, ME, ME. Yes, it is that gooooood.

So if you are die hard canner, and you like real marmalade, I highly suggest you break out your canning pots, and whip up a batch of this delicious cranberry orange marmalade while you can still find fresh cranberries in the produce section {although I’m sure frozen would work just fine too}.

oranges

Ingredients {The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook}

3 pounds navel oranges, thinly sliced
2 1/4 pounds cranberries {I used fresh}
4 pounds granulated sugar
4 ounces fresh lemon juice {I used bottled}

sliced oranges

Day 1

Placed sliced oranges in a large, nonreactive sauce pan. Add enough water to cover the oranges 1 inch, cover, and let rest overnight at room temperature on the counter or stove top. {Save yourself some time by slicing oranges with a mandolin slicer if you have one.}

cranberries

Day 2 

Bring the saucepan with the oranges in it to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer the oranges for 30 minutes or until tender. Stir the mixture every 10 minutes or so. Make sure the oranges remain submerged as they cook {you may add a little more water if needed.} Once the fruit is done cooking, set the saucepan aside and cover tightly, and let the mixture sit overnight at room temperature.

To prepare the cranberry juice:

Place cranberries in a large stock pot and add enough water to cover the cranberries with at least one inch of water. Bring to a boil, then reduce the cranberry mixture to a simmer and cook covered, for 1 -2 hours or until the cranberry water has thickened into a nice syrup like consistency.

cranberry orange marmalade

Place a colander over a large, nonreactive pan and strain the juice into the pan. {I used a large baking dish for this}. Next, cover the colander and pan with plastic wrap and it let sit overnight at room temperature. Doing this will allow any extra juices drain into pan. {More juice, means more marmalade. Yay!}

Day 3 

Remove the plastic wrap from the colander and pan and toss the cranberries. Strain cranberry juice through a fine mesh sieve, then set the cranberry juice aside.

making cranberry orange marmalade

In a large mixing bowl combine the sugar, lemon juice, cranberry juice, cooked orange slices and their liquid together and mix well.

cranberry orange marmalade recipe

Bring a boiling-water canner, 3/4 full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.

Pour the mixture into a large nonreactive pot and bring it to a simmer. Cook until the cranberry orange mixture is reduced by half. {This took about 45 minutes for me} When the mixture reads 220 degrees on a thermometer, test to see if it has “set” by spooning a bit onto a cold plate.  If it has formed a bit of a skin and started to give a bit like goopy jell-o, you’re good to go, if not, cook for a bit longer.

cranberry orange marmalade

Ladle the cranberry orange marmalade immediately into prepared jars {I used a combination of Ball and Weck jars} , filling to within 1/4 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw on bands. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. {Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.} Cover; bring water to gentle boil and process 10 min.

Remove jars and place upright on towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary}. Yields {8} 1/2 pints.

If using Weck Jars find directions HERE.

cranberry orange marmalade

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Low Sugar Triple Berry Jam Recipe

Low Sugar Triple Berry Jam

If you would like to give the gift of homemade jam this winter but don’t have any berries in your freezer, this recipe uses a bag of frozen fruit from Costco, is low sugar {without adding sugar substitutes} and was still good enough to win a blue ribbon at the Boulder County Fair in 2012.  My daughter made it for her professors for Christmas this year and it turned out great.

costco three berries

Ingredients {Recipe Credit}

  • 4 cups blend of blueberries, marionberries and raspberries, crushed {Costco sells a frozen bag of this blend}
  • 1 cup unsweetened apple juice
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. low sugar pectin
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar

costco frozen berries

Directions

Bring a boiling-water canner, 3/4 full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.

Combine crushed berries, fruit juice, and lemon juice into an 8 quart saucepan.  Gradually stir in pectin.  Bring the mixture to a rolling boil, stirring constantly.  Then add the sugar all at once and return mixture to a boil.  Boil for one minute, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat.

triple berry jam canning

Ladle immediately into prepared jars, filling to within 1/4 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads, cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands on {if using traditional jars, if using Weck jars wipe rims, add rubber gaskets and glass lid and clamp on both sides}.  Place jars on elevated rack in a canner. Lower rack into canner. {Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.} Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 10 min. Remove jars and place upright on towel to cool completely.

Low Sugar Triple Berry Jam

After the jars have cooled, check the seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary.  Allow jars to sit, untouched for 12 hours before storing.

canning cupboard

Looking for a few more canning recipes?

Search my Full List of Canning Recipes

Want to start canning, but don’t know where to start?  Here’s a guide to help you get started.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.