Friday Night at the Movies – Pretty in Pink

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Ok, so now that I’ve watched Sixteen Candles, I’m on a Molly Ringwald AND John Hughes obsession…which is lucky for me, because she is in a lot of his movies.  Tonight I’m watching Pretty in Pink.  I watched it last year for the first time in ages, and now I can’t get enough.  It’s my favorite way to relive those awkward 80′s memories:  in my pj’s and a million years actually being in the decade again :) .

pretty in pink

Sidenote:  There can’t be a single person out there who can’t immediately sing OMD’s “If You Leave,” all because of this movie.   Try not to sing it right now, I dare you.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Tips for Reseeding Your Lawn in the Fall

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Tips for Reseeding Your Lawn in the Fall

Last spring, the HH and I reseeded our grass.  We chose to do it in the spring, because as you know, we were trying to sell our house and wanted to put our best foot forward.  The best time to reseed your lawn, though, is actually in the fall.  The soil is still warm–so you can choose varieties of grass that will germinate only in warmer temperatures.

raking fall leaves

The trees are losing their leaves, so the grass will receive more sunlight.  Best of all, weeds and diseases that rear their ugly little heads in the spring become much less prevalent.  The steps for reseeding in the fall are pretty much identical to spring reseeding, so if you want to know how, click HERE and get a quick tutorial.

grass seed

After you have the basic how-to down, here are a couple of tips to help you get the best results:

  1. Try mixing your seed with equal parts seed to damp sand {put the whole lot in the spreader}.  It will jump start the germination process.  This can be particularly beneficial if you know that you have a window of good weather left.
  2. To ensure that the seeds make contact with the soil, and don’t become bird food, try rolling the seed in after spreading it.  Just get a roller and fill it half full of water.
  3. If you are so inclined, a starter fertilizer can help make up for less than ideal soil conditions.
  4. Make sure to keep off the new grass for several weeks–tramping through it can damage its delicate root system.
  5. For fall reseeding, it is best to let the grass get up to 4″ tall before mowing for the first time.  When you do mow mow it to about 2 1/2″ tall.  Allow the grass to stay longer throughout the winter to protect it from cold temperatures.

With a little TLC, you should have thick green grass before the first snowfall–and a blanket of green waiting for you next spring.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

The Difference Between a Light and a Hard Freeze

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The Difference Between a Light and a Hard Freeze

My buddy, Heather, from Massachusetts mentioned the other day that it was getting cold in her neck of the woods.  Her tomatoes are still mass producing, so she will be putting up her hoop house up at night time starting this week.

how to make a hoop house

Hoop houses are the perfect protection for a light freeze–especially for delicate plants that really like the warm weather, like tomatoes.  And, in case you’ve ever wondered what the difference between a light freeze and a hard freeze is, I thought I would kind of break it down, because I am cool like that.

light frost on lambs ear

A light freeze is sometimes referred to as a frost.  A frost happens when temperatures dip down and their is moisture in the air.  Frosts can definitely damage sensitive leaves, but, unlike a freeze, temperatures do not need to get below 32 degrees {frosts can happen in temperatures as high as 40 degrees, if there is enough moisture in the air}.

A light freeze or frost can also occur when temperatures dip down below 32 degrees, but do not say there for days and days on end.  Daytime temperatures continue to be mild/warm.  Lots of plants can survive a light frost/freeze, so long as you cover them and prevent moisture from building up on their leaves while the temperatures are cold.

fava bean plants frost winter

A hard freeze is a different ball game.  It is the beginning of the end for standard gardening.  A hard freeze is when temperatures dip below 28-30 degrees and stays there for several days.  The daytime temperatures also typically do not rise high enough to make up for the night time dip.  A hard freeze is a death sentence for warm weather plants.  If there is a hard freeze warning, it’s best to harvest what you can from your plants–even a hoop house won’t protect them for long on a hard frost.

So, when the weather man predicts a light frost/freeze, make sure to run out and cover your plants.  When a hard freeze is predicted, harvest what you can.  If you’re not sure when the average frost/freeze happens in your area, I totally recommend getting a Farmer’s Almanac.  It will not only give you average dates, but tell you HOW to predict a frost/freeze.  It’s a  pretty handy little reference.

farmers almanac

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Not Looking Back… Not Even for a Second

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pumpkins

As we closed the garage and walked out of our home of the past eight years last night, the HH turned to me and ask if I was going to miss it.

hugging rhubarb

And I said no. But that didn’t stop me from walking around the backyard and hugging all the plants and hard work I/we left behind.

zucchini

Eight years ago when our kids were 9 and 10 a big house on a wooded acre was a gooood idea. Our kids had plenty of room to run around, dig for treasures and climb trees.

pop up greenhouse

I had a blank slate.

mavis garden blog raised vegetable bedsAnd I filled it to my heart’s content.

shoveling dirt

Over the years we hauled in hundreds of yards of topsoil, planted fruit trees, berry bushes and even installed a greenhouse. It was HARD WORK.

growing vegetables in a greenhouse

And I loved every single minute of it. Until I realized that once Monkey Boy and The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird were gone and off to college, I’d be the only one left to plant the plants, grow the vegetables, and to put up the harvest. And then what? What was I going to do with all of that food?     All that space.

backyard chickens

It the idea of maintaining that lifestyle {chickens included} just became too much. And that’s when we decided to take the plunge and downsize and buy a smaller house on a more manageable sized lot.

About 5 minutes away. :) It was the first and only house we looked at. I knew it was “the one” as soon as I drove by it. The house is by no means my dream home, nor does it have an awesome kitchen, amazing garden space, or any of those things I’d typically look for when shopping for a new home. Not.At.All.

But I saw what it COULD BE.

The house is SCREAMING for a cottage garden to be planted, a kitchen remodel, and some PERSONALITY.

The bones, location and exterior of the home we bought are great and I know with a little help {okay a lot} from Chino the Handyman and his crew it’s going to be AWESOME.

omlet chicken coop eglu cube

We gave all of our chickens, and the Eglu {their lifetime home} to Chino the Handyman’s best friend and his family. They have 4 young kiddos, and just purchased their dream “mini farm.” We know they are going to a good home and most importantly, they will be loved. 

apple tree

The fruit on the trees, beans, cucumbers, lettuce, zucchinis and pumpkins on the vine, we left those behind too. As luck would have it, the family who bought our home has 3 young kiddos and I couldn’t think of a better “Welcome Home” gift to leave them than an instant u-pick garden right in their very own backyard. :)

Change is good. And the fun starts Monday.

Peace Out Girl Scouts,

~ Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

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My 80′s revival is still going strong.  Tonight we are going to watch Ferris Bueller’s Day Off on the laptop since our t.v. has been packed up.  Maybe with The Girl off to college I am trying to recapture the light-heartedness of my youth?  Or maybe I just think this movie is awesome.  Either way, it’s free on Prime and I’m watching it.

ferris buellers day off

Remember how COOL Mathew Broderick was?  I think we were all pretty much in love with Ferris, wouldn’t you say? ;)

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Garlic

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How to Grow Garlic

Is it already time to plant garlic bulbs again? Where does the time go. It seems like it was just yesterday and I was harvesting garlic from our garden. Is it just me, or are there more things to do in the garden in the fall than in the Spring?

how-to-plant-garlic

Growing garlic is very simple and straightforward. For starters you want to try and find certified garlic bulbs {most local nurseries have it in stock this time of year}. Some people just buy garlic bulbs at the grocery store, but a lot of times produce {even bulbs} can be sprayed to slow growth, so I like to buy certified garlic bulbs so I know exactly what I’m getting. Botanical Interests and Territorial Seed have a great selection.

fall-how-to-plant-garlic-bulbs

To plant garlic, first break the bulb apart and inspect the cloves for any damage.  Toss any cloves that are brown or have decay on them. Next, plant the garlic about 2″ deep and about 6″ apart in loose, well drained soil. Cover the bulbs with soil, water and walk away. Mother Nature will take care of the rest until spring. Unless of course you live somewhere where it never rains during the fall and winter months. If that’s the case, then be sure and give your garlic bed a drink every now and again.

fall-planting-how-to-plant-garlic-bulbs

Once the garlic begins to sprout in the spring, I like to cover my garlic patch with a couple inches of leaf litter to help insulate the garlic bulbs a bit from the cold {if you live in a warmer climate you don’t need to do this}.

how to grow garlic shoot

I don’t know about you, but I use garlic practically every day in my cooking, so it’s really nice to be able to grow it in my backyard each year for a nice stash when I need it.

How to Grow Garlic

  • Plant cloves 6 to 8 weeks before a hard freeze so the roots have a chance to get established
  • Do not break cloves until you are ready to plant
  • Plant cloves 2″ deep with the root end down and the point side up
  • Space cloves 4″- 6″ apart {depending on size}

elephant garlic bulbWill you be growing garlic this year?

How many bulbs do you usually by each year and when do YOU plant your garlic?

~Mavis

Looking for more information in growing, cultivating and enjoying garlic?  Check out the book The Complete Book of Garlic By Ted Jordan Meredith.  Amazon currently has it in stock and ready to ship.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

It Looks Like a Parsnip…. But it’s Not

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looks like a parsnip

Calling all you garden sleuths out there… Does anyone know what this plant is called? I was weeding my fall vegetable garden last night here on the east coast and noticed a ton of these parsnip looking plants growing between the rows.

fake parsnip plant

The roots look like a parsnip but the leaves remind me of potatoes. I am totally baffled.

fall garden planting

I’m not sure if I somehow dropped a packet of seeds because the plant is sprinkled between the rows of my fall veggies or if this thing is just some sort of weed.

Anyone know for sure?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

The Benefits of Using Row Covers

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row covers tomatoes raised garden bed

Row covers are a great way to keep certain things in your garden {i.e. heat} and later on in the season, certain things OUT of your garden {i.e. pests}.  They are cheap, effective, and even though some people think they are an eyesore, I see them as kind of charming. I always think, “Oh, a gardener.  Awesome. Solidarity, my friend, solidarity.”

How to Build a Row Cover or Mini Greenhouse Poly Tunnel

Row covers, depending on your climate, can extend your season by up to a month on each end, spring and fall.  In the spring, they help keep the soil warmer, essentially letting the little seedlings know it’s safe to do their business.  Floating row covers, like the ones I use, have some sort of support system, like PVC pipe bent in an arch over garden boxes, to keep the cover from sitting directly on the plants.

spinach growing in a greenhouse

It is not always necessary to use supports, if you get a lightweight row cover, you can simply drape it over the plants.  Though, lightweight covers do more for controlling pests than cold.  Essentially, by using a hooped row cover, you create a very cheap, efficient mini greenhouse.  When protecting your plants from cold, you really want to go with a plastic row cover.  The heavier the plastic, the better the protection–though, the less light that penetrates, so you have to make the decision based on your climate.

fabric row cover

Fabric row covers are awesome for keeping pests, like beetles, birds, squirrels, etc. OUT of the garden.  They are specifically designed to let air and light in and keep varmint {I don’t use that word enough} out.  The cool thing about cloth row covers is that they can be draped over the plants without support, like a little blanket of protection.  They really only provide light protection for frost, though, so don’t rely on them heavily there.  They are cheap, can be easily cut to size, and are pretty easy to work with and store to use over and over again.

eliot coleman four season farm greenhouse

Year-round gardeners swear by hoop frames and row covers.  They are like a poor man’s greenhouse.  I think it will take a little trial and error, but so far, I have been really impressed with my row cover hoop house.  If you want to start using row covers for year round gardening, here’s a few tips:

First, spread down some sort of mulch, use leaves, straw {seedless variety} about 12″ thick over the top of your veggies.  Then, cover your frame with a row cover.  The combination creates a perfect environment for year round production of cool weather veggies {i.e. carrots, parsnips, turnips, etc.}.  If you live in a SUPER cold area, you can even consider providing an additional layer of row cover to further insulate.

What do you think, are you ready to give row covers a try?  Or, maybe you have been using them for years and have learned some tricks you’d like to share?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Ripen Green Tomatoes

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How to Ripen Green Tomatoes

Now that the weather is getting colder, those last tomatoes still hanging on the vine may need an intervention if you want them to ripen.  Then again, you may have all sorts of recipes for green tomatoes, but if not, you can try a couple of these methods to squeeze the most out of your tomato crop:

Mavis Garden Blog - 5 Tips for Ripening Tomatoes on the Vine

If it is just a light first frost, cover your tomatoes and leave them on the vine.  Tomatoes need to reach about 85 degrees to ripen, so giving them another week or two of day time temperatures will probably get them to ripen.  Meanwhile, once nighttime temperatures start to drop, you probably won’t get any new tomatoes, so pinch off all of the flowers from here on out so that the plant can use all of its resources to ripen the existing tomatoes.

what-should-I-do-with-green-tomatoes

If it is a hard freeze you are facing, it’s time to pick ALL of the tomatoes.  Bring them inside, tomatoes that have a slight orange hue will likely ripen on their own {kind of like the grocery store tomatoes have to}.  You can try ripening totally green tomatoes by placing them in a warm place and layer them in between newspaper.  The newspaper helps trap the ethylene gas that causes tomatoes to ripen.

how to ripen green tomatoes

Some tomatoes will rot in the process, this is totally normal.  Just remove those tomatoes and compost/throw them away so that they don’t affect the whole lot.  For smaller amounts, place the tomatoes in a paper bag with an apple or banana.  The fruits will give off ethylene gas, which in turn, will ripen the tomatoes {in theory}.  In both cases, check the tomatoes daily for progress.

It’s always so sad to say goodbye to tomato season. :(

~Mavis

canning-green-tomato-curry-sauce

Don’t forget to use some of those tomatoes to can a batch of Green Tomato Curry Sauce. It’s freakin’ delicious!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Give the Gift of Seeds: The Gift That Keeps on {Growing}

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savings-seeds-and-giving-them-as-gifts1

So I’m all about gifting things that are unique, homemade or super long-lasting. These fun gifts I’m talking about in my latest eHow article, Give the Gift of Gardening This Winter, cover all three.

What if I told you now is the perfect time to get a jump start on your holiday gifts?

Because seriously, it is.

I was out in the garden collecting herbs last night when I noticed my chive plants were dropping seeds like bombs! So what’s a thrifty gardener to do? Collect seeds and package them up nice and cute for some inexpensive holiday gifts, of course.

Read the full article HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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