Friday Night at the Movies – BBC Future of Food – Part 1: India

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I pretty much love the BBC and everything they put out, so when I stumbled onto this full-length documentary on the Future of Food from a global perspective, I just had to share.  Tonight I am going to watch Part One.   The best part is that the WHOLE thing is totally free.  Go ahead, just click play and enjoy.

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



How to Find, Swap, Share or Sell Local Fruits and Vegetables

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The other day while perusing the world wide web, I came across a new start-up company called called Ripe Near Me on Treehugger.  The aim of the company is to make finding local produce easier and more convenient, because let’s be honest, unless you have a year round farmers market {Go HERE for a directory to farmers markets in Washington} in your area, it can be a real hassle to seek out local produce.  Ripe Near Me hopes to create an extensive database that allows users to type in their area and find local produce, not just farmers markets, but also from local gardening enthusiasts with excess produce and known public foraging sites.  If this company can pull it off, I would totally be up for putting my excess produce on the site–AND swapping for other people’s.  Seriously, how cool would that be?

how to glean free plums

You already know how I feel about food waste.  It’s bad, bad, bad.  It seems to me that local produce is pretty abundant, we just need to know how to FIND it.  Last year, The Girl and I were able to get free plums from a local couple who had waaaaay more plums than they could handle.  We got lucky.  I saw a handwritten cardboard sign, “Free U-Pick Plums” and stopped.  You bet I did.  In return, we gave the couple some of our eggs and some heirloom tomatoes.

Foraging for Free Food – Where to Find the Good Stuff

Foraging on public lands is another great way to get local produce.  Last year, I found a website that locals could post free foraging locations in their area.  There are tons of public locations that have fruit trees, berry patches, etc. that you can forage for food, if you want to put the time in.  Most of the time, the food would go to waste otherwise.  The problem is, more often than not, you have to rely on word of mouth to know where the hot spots are located.  Having a map where other foragers share their finds gives you a place to start.  In an effort to pay it forward, if you know of good foraging locations, you should totally hop on the site and let other people know.

heirloom vegetable stand

You can also start by hooking people up with YOUR own excess produce {remember, you never know what you will be able to get in return–it’s always an adventure}.  Last year, I decided to make a little extra cash on some of my excess produce {while still giving my local peeps a steal of a deal}.  I set up a little table with heirloom tomatoes, garlic, potatoes, rhubarb, and lettuce.  I left a sign that said, “Fresh vegetables.  Pay or leave what you like in exchange.”  Wouldn’t you know it, I ended up with $33 and quite a few food products.

bartering food

And, of course, if you want to keep it simple, just start with the people you know.  Your neighbors may totally be willing to barter with you.  I’ve traded my garden veggies for all sorts of food stuffs.  It saved me a trip to the store, and they got fresh homegrown organic produce.  It’s win-win.

How about YOU, how do you find local produce?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Sunflowers {Start to Finish}

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how to grow sunflowers

My daughter The Girl Who Thinks She’s a Bird has been planting sunflowers ever since she could walk. I’m not sure who loves them more, her or the birds that come along at the end of each summer and peck at the seeds. Not only are they beautiful to look at, but they are great for summertime bouquets too.

Brief description:  Sunflowers are annual flowers with beautiful bright flowers, usually yellow, red, or orange.  They are great for attracting bees, birds, and butterflies to your garden.

botanical interests sunflower seeds

Where to Plant Sunflowers:  Plant in a sunny location in raised beds, garden beds, and/or containers {depending on the variety}.

sunflower seeds

Planting Seeds:  Plant 1/2″-1″ deep about 1-2 weeks after last frost.  When seedlings are 2″ tall, thin to 1 every 12″.

Growing Tips:  Sunflowers love hot weather.  They are extremely hardy.

How to Harvest:  To harvest cut flowers as needed and place into water.  To harvest sunflower seeds, allow the flower heads to dry out and lightly rub the head to reveal the seeds.

regional-planting-guides

How to Roast Sunflower Seeds:  You can roast the seeds by soaking them in a salt water solution overnight.  Then drain them, pat dry, and roast them at 300 degrees for 30-40 minutes, turning them occasionally.

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to a handy dandy chart that is broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

DIY Garden Markers Using Bricks

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DIY Garden Markers Using Bricks

If you plant herbs {or any other edibles} right  into your garden beds, these brick garden markers make an awesome addition to the overall look of your beds {and they are, of course, totally functional}.

You’ll Need:

  • Bricks {super cheap at Home Depot}
  • A sharpie
  • Pencil
  • 5 minutes

DIY Garden Markers Using Bricks

Directions:

Using a pencil, sketch out the name of your plant {this will allow you to play with the size and safeguard you against any mistakes}.  Try to take up as much of the brick as possible–they look better that way.  Go over the penciled letters with the sharpie, once you are satisfied with the lettering, placement, and size.

Set the bricks in the beds along side the plant.  Cute, easy, done.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Harvesting Carrots, Snow Peas and Strawberries

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dogs in the garden Lucy the puggle dog

Last night around 8 pm Lucy the Puggle Dog and I wandered out to the garden to harvest a few things. 8 o’clock! Can you believe it? I LOVE this time of year. I don’t know about you, but my favorite time to garden in the summertime is either really early {when the birds are all chirping and it’s still a wee bit chilly} or right before bedtime after all the dinner dishes are done.
mavis garden blog

Even though I’ve kind of taken the year off of gardening {okay, by that I mean I’m not trying to grow a TON of vegetables} I’ve still fallen behind on my planting a bit.

I don’t know how it happened, but I totally forgot to plant our zucchini seeds in early may.

watering raised garden beds

Oh well. I guess this just means they’ll germinate faster, right? ;)
harvesting snow peas

After planting 6 sets of zucchini seeds, we harvested the first batch of snow peas. And yes, it’s safe to say they didn’t make it in to the house and into the stir fry pan. Ha!

Maybe tomorrows harvest will.
garden fresh strawberries

And take a look at these beauties. Fresh, homegrown strawberries. Does it get any better than that?

They didn’t make it into the house either. ;)

Ahh June. I love you.

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Monthly Garden Chores – June

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mavis-butterfield-one-hundred-dollars-a-month

Summer is here in Washington.  The days are mild, and dare I say, sunny?  I don’t know about you, but these are the easy days of gardening for me.  Just a little watering and weeding–most of the planting is done.

pumpkin seeds botanical interests

Seeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month

No seeds to start indoors this month.  I’ll start a few next month for my fall garden.

See the full list of seeds I’ll be planting this year

Ruby Red Swiss Chard

What I Plan to Transplant Outside this Month

  • Parsnips {planting them now ensures they will be ready for Thanksgiving dinner}
  • Swiss Chard {it’s been in the greenhouse, but I am moving it out this month}

broccoli

What I plan to Harvest This Month

  • Rhubarb
  • Broccoli
  • Lettuce
  • Radishes
  • Lettuce
  • Peas
  • Strawberries
  • Chives
  • Sprouts
  • Basil
  • Bok Choy
  • Swiss Chard
  • Microgreens
  • Basil
  • Endive

houseplant

Houseplants and Indoor Bulbs

You should be watering/feeding houseplants regularly now.  You probably don’t have any indoor bulb maintenance this month, so get outdoors and enjoy the sunshine!

fiskars garden pruners

Trees and Shrubs

Prune your Rhododendrons and Azaleas if they have finished blooming {by deadheading them}.  If it is getting hot in your area, most trees can benefit from a deep watering this month.  This is also a good month to put mulch around trees and shrubs that are susceptible to the heat and low water conditions.

bird-netting

Weed and Pest Control

Continue regular weeding.  I prefer natural pest control, so start considering being a good host for beneficial bugs in your garden.  Most nurseries will have ladybugs for purchase too.  If the birds are starting to poke around the strawberries, etc. in your garden, it might be time to invest in a net.  Squash bugs might be making their first appearance too–I like to keep on top of them by squishing them as I see them and practicing co-planting to repel them.

lawn mowing tips

Lawn Care

Regular mowing, watering, feeding {if you prescribe to that sort of thought}, and preventative care {i.e. bill bug and crabgrass prevention} is really all you need to do to keep a nice healthy lawn.

These garden chores are based on my Zone 8a Seattle/Tacoma WA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Stardust

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The Girl and I are taking a complete detour from our normal Friday night taste and are going to watch Stardust tonight.  It’s about a star {literally from the sky}, who is personified by Claire Danes that falls from the sky into an enchanted world, just beyond “the wall” of a normal English village.  The enchanted world leads to an adventure, magic, and…wait for it…yes, love.  What can I say, we are looking for a little whimsy in our life {and it doesn’t hurt that it’s FREE on Prime}.

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.  Did you love it? Hate it? Can’t wait to watch it over and over?

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Recycle Wine Corks into Plant Markers

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wine cork garden markers

I love it when I stumble onto a genius idea that I can implement in seconds, and that’s totally handy. This wine cork recycling project is one of those genius ideas. It takes one man’s junk and turns it into a treasure for gardeners!

Now I don’t drink wine, but I know enough people that do to provide me with a whole bunch of wine corks. Then all I needed were some wooden plant stakes or bamboo skewers and a black marker. Simple as that I have cute garden markers made out of something that would have otherwise wound up in the trash. It’s a win-win!

wine corks

Supplies:
Recycled wine corks {I suppose you could buy them new if you can’t get your hands on any used ones}
Wooden plant stakes or bamboo skewers
Black Sharpie-type marker

Wine Cork Garden Markers

Directions:

Using the Sharpie, write the plant name on the side of the wine cork. Insert sharp end of your stakes or skewers right into the center of the cork. Push the wine cork plant markers into the dirt of their respective plants. Now you have cute plant markers you can sit back and enjoy while sipping wine {therefore, adding to your wine cork collection!}.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Broccoli, Peas, Radishes and More

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broccoli plant

While Lucy and I were working in the garden yesterday I went ahead and snapped a few photos of the fruits and vegetables currently growing in our backyard. I don’t know about you but I just LOVE seeing what other people have growing in their yards the same time I do.

sugar snap pea plants

Peas! We should be picking our first round of Sugar Snap Peas in about 2 weeks! brussels sprouts buds

I spy with my little eye… a baby Brussels sprout beginning to form. kale plant

Kale. Whoop T Do. red onions growing in a planter box

Red onions. I’m growing these so I can make a big ole’ batch of homemade salsa this summer.

tomato flower blossom

Tomato blossoms. A sign of good things to come.

french breakfast radish

French breakfast radishes. Perfect for snacking! beets growing in a raised garden box

Beets. This year we are growing a couple of different varieties. I think these are the Chiggoa variety if I’m remembering correctly. Hopefully I can get the beets thinned out this weekend.growing potatoes in a raised garden box

Are you growing spuds this year? We have them planted in two spots. The garden boxes and also in the lasagna garden. {The ones in the lasagna garden are volunteers from last year}.

bee pollinating flower

Mr. Bumble Bee. Where would we be without you?

~Mavis

P.S. How is your garden doing? Have you picked any peas yet this year?

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Butterfield | Backyard Garden Pictures 5/25/14

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raised garden beds

I don’t know about you, but I love this time of year. The grass is green, the garden boxes are overflowing with produce and the weather for the most part is pretty stinkin’ awesome. Not too hot and not too cold. pallet garden

Although I haven’t been able to spend as much time in the garden this year as I would have liked too, it’s amazing too me how good everything still looks. Brussels Sprouts and onions

Especially the Brussels sprouts and onions!
beets and kale

The tree of chard is still producing and the beets and kale plants and doing great as well. raised garden beds

Here’s a view of the garden boxes from the back. lasagna garden

Remember my lasagna garden? Well it’s been overtaken by potato plants. :)  greenhouse gardening in Seattle

The greenhouse is my favorite part of my garden right now. The heirloom tomato plants are growing like mad and the basil is just starting to appear. garden full of weeds

The garden of shame. Weeds. Weeds. Weeds.  should pull those.

cascadia raspberry plants

And last but not least, the overgrown raspberry forest. One of these days I’ll get my act together and stake them properly.

How is YOUR garden doing these day?

~Mavis

This years garden is being sponsored by the folks at Botanical Interests Seed Company. You can check out their website HERE, order their new 2014 Garden Seed Catalog HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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