Foraging for Dinner in the Lettuce Jungle

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growing lettuce in a greenhouse garden

Last night during a ridiculously epic rain storm, I went foraging in the lettuce jungle for some salad fixin’s. Not having to go to the store is pretty high on my list pretty much everyday of the week. The crowds, the noises, the dirty shopping carts and baskets that never get washed {unless rain counts} are a big deterrent for me.

cutting lettuce leaves

But walking to the backyard in the rain to find something for dinner? No problem, they’ve got these things called umbrellas and let me tell you Bob, they are one of the coolest inventions ever.

giant bowl of homegrown lettuce

BYOS. Bring your own scissors and go home with a giant bowl of gourmet greens. :) planting tomatoes in a greenhouse

Ahh but what’s a trip to the garden if you can’t get a little sidetracked… right?planting tomatoes in a ginat tub

Last night before dinner I clean up the lettuce bed and transplanted my first 2 tomato plants {Sun Gold} to our greenhouse garden. It’s still a little too chilly to transplant the tomatoes directly into the garden beds, but they should be find in the greenhouse.

using tomato cages

Hot diggety dog, can you believe it? Tomato season is right around the corner.

Let’s get this party started!

~ Mavis

 

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Is it Just Me, or is the Pollen Everywhere?

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pollen on greenhouse

Holy cannoli’s people.  The pollen is EVERYWHERE.

pollen

The greenhouse, on top of the cars, the front porch, I can’t even spend 10 minutes outside without getting it all over my black shirt. Sheesh. It’s a good thing I’m not allergic to the stuff or else I’d have to lock myself in the house for the rest of the summer. lettuce growing in gutters

Luckily the pollen has not found it’s way into our greenhouse. Taking the time to have to rinse the sticky yellow stuff off our lettuce leaves does not appeal to me one bit.

growing lettuce in containers

And let’s talk about that lettuce shall we? lettuce in containers

To put it simply, I can’t keep up. The Butterfield lettuce factory is at full capacity and if I try and feed my husband another giant salad for dinner I think he’ll lose it completely. lettuce seed head

The rocket lettuce especially. Wowza! Have you ever tried rocket lettuce before? It’s crazy spicy. So spicy in fact that I’m letting the rest of it go to seed. oregano

Outside of the greenhouse the herbs are really beginning to take off. Check out my oregano plant, ain’t she pretty? I don’t know about you, but I love low maintenance herb plants. chives

And the chives, just look at them. I started these chives from seed 2 years ago and now the whole bed is full of the perennial herbs. I love it!chive seed head

Dear Spring, I love you and all the flowers and herbs you bring. But not the pollen. :(

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Growing Lettuce in Gutters

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growing lettuce in a greenhouse

This past week I planted another row of lettuce in our greenhouse gutters, and let me tell you Bob, things are sure filling up in there.

growing lettuce in gutters

This time I transplanted out a nice red leaf variety. I figured it will compliment the Romaine lettuce I transplanted a few weeks ago in some of our dinner salads and on some gourmet burgers.

lettuce in gutters

I wonder if non gardeners have ever tried REAL, fresh picked lettuce before. Do you think they would even be able to taste the difference between the homegrown stuff and the lettuce that’s stuffed into plastic containers and sold at the grocer for cheap, cheap, cheap? growing lettuce in containers

Growing lettuce in containers {and gutters} has got to be the easiest thing to grow on the planet. Well, besides weeds. ;)  lettuce

The Farmer’s Market Blend from Botanical Interests is my favorite. lettuce seedlings

Start to finish, {in the spring} most lettuce varieties only take about 45 – 60 days to reach maturity. Talk about instant gratification. And the best part about growing lettuce? Pretty much all you need to get a good harvest is plant your seeds in a good soil mix and keep them watered. That’s it!

So if you have a friend who wants to try gardening, but doesn’t know where to start, give them a packet of lettuce seeds because they are pretty much a no fail vegetable.

lucy the puggle dog

In fact I bet a puggle could even grow lettuce. If I could get her to stop digging for treasures of course. ;)

Life is good.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Growing Lettuce in Gutters

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growing lettuce in a greenhouse

Yesterday I spent the afternoon transplanting lettuce starts in the greenhouse. For the past two springs I have grown lettuce in my greenhouse gutters with great success, so I figured hey, why not do it again. Why mess with a good thing, right? ;)

growing lettuce in gutters

You don’t have to have a greenhouse to try this. Nope, if you have a fence or some type of wall you can attach a gutter to, you can grow lettuce in gutters. It’s super easy, I promise. Simply line your gutters with a wee bit of pea gravel, add potting soil, then add your seeds {or lettuce starts} and water as you normally would. {See how I installed gutters in my greenhouse.}

winter lettuce container

Check out this stock tank filled with lettuce. Holy cow man, it’s really taken off this past week. My guess is the conditions for lettuce are pretty ideal right now. Rain one day {making the greenhouse nice and humid} and sunny the next.
organically grown lettuce containers

We are harvesting fresh lettuce about every other day right now.

lettuce seedlings

And the lettuce seeds I planted about 10 days ago and starting to pop though the soil. Yee-Haw! Looks like we will be enjoying lettuce until it warms up around here. {Ahem, that means July}. ;)

magnum glass greenhouse

Gardening is cool, no matter how you do it. Wouldn’t you agree?

Are YOU growing lettuce this year? Got a favorite variety?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Mavis Garden Blog – Harvesting Lettuce in March

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growing peas in gutters

Have you planted your peas yet? I planted my first round of peas in early February in gutters and then placed them in the greenhouse. Yes, it was a wee bit early to be planting peas and we did get a hard frost the day after I planted them, but luckily, they are starting to pop up through the soil. :)

Round two of my sugar snap peas were planted last week in one of my garden boxes… and round three? Well I’ll be planting those this weekend. If you have never grown peas before, give it a try this year because they are hands down a million times better than anything you’ll ever try from the frozen food section. Fresh peas = Love.

growing lettuce in a greenhouse

And lettuce. winter lettuce greenhouse

Holy cow, we are practically swimming in mesclun lettuce these days.
growing lettuce in containers

We have three containers full of lettuce and are harvesting every other day right now for side salads. mesclun lettuce

Think how much money brides could save if they walked down the aisle with bouquets of gourmet lettuce greens instead of roses. ;) True, walking down the aisle with a head of iceberg lettuce would be a little weird, but if they chose the right variety of lettuce, it might just work. mavis butterfield garden

Arugula Rocket Lettuce for instance has a beautiful leafy pattern to it, but if the bridal party were to get a little hungry and decided to nibble on their bouquets, they’d be in store of a huge surprise.

Have you tried it before? Wowza! It.Is.Spicy. Almost so spicy on it’s own it makes you gag. ;)

Happy planting everyone, I’m off to start some more seeds,

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Greenhouse Garden – Growing Winter Lettuce

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magnum glass greenhouse

Yesterday Lucy the Puggle Dog and I ventured out in the wind and the rain to see how our winter crops were coming along in the greenhouse. I was originally planning to buy some sort of heater this winter so I’d be able to grow more vegetables, but I just never got around to it.

growing lettuce in winter

So, what can you grow in an unheated glass greenhouse in the winter? growing lettuce in winter

Lettuce! :) lettuce in winter

Lots and lots of lettuce. Not only do we have it growing in two large stock tanks, but we also have lettuce growing in a couple of garden pots as well.

mesclun lettuce

I think we still have a few more weeks to go before we can harvest anything because the temperatures outside are still pretty chilly, but it will be worth the wait for sure. Being able to grow you own lettuce greens in the winter is just plain RAD if you ask me.

turnip greens winter

Oh and remember how I thought I was growing spinach in the greenhouse? Well it turns out I was growing turnips. Ha! I guess turnips don’t like to be grown in pots though. I planted the greenhouse seeds around the same time as I planted the ones outside in our garden boxes and those ones are HUGE, these, not so much. Oh well, live and learn I guess.
grow herbs in winterOh and check out the herbs! Right now we have rosemary, oregano, thyme and purple sage ready to harvest. The oregano and sage is a little iffy, but this time of year if you want to eat from your garden you can’t be to picky now can you? ;)

How is YOUR garden doing right now?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

My Winter Greenhouse Garden

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magnum glass greenhouse gardening

Yesterday I showed you pictures of my outdoor winter garden so today I thought I would share some photos of what’s growing in and around my greenhouse garden.
winter herbs

Believe it or not, we’ve still got a bunch of harvestable fresh perennial herbs. On the left side of the greenhouse we have oregano, rosemary and chives.

winter herbs sage

On the right side, purple sage, thyme and garlic chives. Not to shabby for November if you ask me.

lucy the puggle dog

Inside the greenhouse we have lettuce that we’ve been picking every few days for side salads. I figure we probably have enough lettuce growing to last us a few more weeks.

lettuce seedlings

A few weeks ago I also planted some lettuce seedlings in galvanized tubs in the greenhouse. Their growth has been pretty slow due to the cold temps, but for the most part it looks like we are going to get a nice crop of lettuce maybe around Christmas or New Years. We’ll see.

spinach

We also have a pot of spinach growing too. It’s not much, but it’s something to look forward to.

beet seedlings

And beets seedlings. Yep, we’ve got plenty of those. I just need to find some time to plant them in the main garden and then build another row cover to protect them from the cooler temps or any light frost we might get.

meyer lemon treeAnd last but not least, Lemon, our Meyer Lemon Tree. We have two lemons that are beginning to turn yellow, can you believe it?! Everytime I go out to the greenhouse I am amazed that the lemons are still there and they have not dropped to the ground and shriveled up.

Hang in there Lemon!! You can do it. ;)

~Mavis

winter greenhouse garden

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Winter Gardening – Growing Lettuce in a Greenhouse

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Winter Gardening - Growing Lettuce in a Greenhouse

Yesterday Lucy the Puggle Dog and I spent the afternoon digging up old an old garden bed and filling the stock tanks we have in the greenhouse with dirt. When we were finished we brought out the tray of lettuce and beet seedlings we started a few weeks ago and separated the tiny plants as best as we could. beet seedling

Transplanting seedlings can be tricky sometimes because you have to be careful not to disturb the roots too much or you could damage them and then they’ll die. :(

winter lettuce

Ideally you’d want to transplant just two seedlings into the designated space, but I like to add in a few more as “insurance.” You can always go back and pluck a few out once the plant gets a little more established.

Winter Gardening Greenhouse Mavis ButterfieldHere’s what the greenhouse looked like when we were all done. In the far left corner I have peas growing in a pot, then lettuce and a few beets in the stock tank I’m watering, and then two more pots filled with lettuce seedlings on both sides of the greenhouse walls.

I still have a bunch more beet seedlings to plant, but I’m going to wait a few more days until I can get a row cover built to protect them {I’ll be planting them in the main garden}.

How is your garden doing these days?

~Mavis

gardening-books-the-winter-harvest-handbook Are you planning for a winter harvest? The Winter Harvest Handbook By Eliot Coleman is a great book!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

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Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

Yesterday I showed you some pictures of what I currently had growing in our greenhouse. But what I didn’t share was all the dirty window panes and gutters filled with pine needles and weeds.

I even found a little grey mold starting to pop up in some places {which is no surprise given the warm humid temperature in the greenhouse}.  So, yesterday, I hauled everything out of the greenhouse so I could clean and disinfect it.

Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

First things first, as you know, I am not a huge fan of harsh chemicals, so first I used scrubbed down the greenhouse with a little Dawn dishsoap and water with the HH’s car washing supplies. ;) Shhh. Don’t tell him.

Cleaning and Disinfecting the Greenhouse for Winter Gardening

It’s actually a pretty good idea to clean your greenhouse at least once a year.  Otherwise, after awhile, it will start to harbor algae, fungus, pests etc. which will wreak havoc on new plantings.  Since I a plan on gardening through the winter, I think I will do a cleaning now, and one again this spring.

Again, since I plan on gardening this winter, the glass in and outside of the greenhouse needs to be spotless.  Any residue will only filter out already sparse winter light. See those giant stock tanks? I’ll be plantings lettuce and beet seedlings in them once I get them filled with some homemade potting soil.

terra-cotta-pots

Greenhouse cleaning time is also a great time to clean out pots and trays.  If you will planting something new in the trays, it is important to rinse and disinfect them.  As for you pots, you can add a little compost and make sure that your next crop plays well with whatever you planted in the pot last.  If not, you may want to empty the potting soil, clean the pot, and get fresh potting soil.

brown slug black spots

After you remove everything from the greenhouse and start to clean, make sure to keep an eye out for pests.  This is like therapy.  You can pick, squish, salt, or sprinkle Sluggo on all of the slugs and other pests that might be trying to winter in your warm greenhouse.  They are like enemies lying in wait, ready to feed on your next crop.  They.Must.Be.Destroyed.

Keep Calm and Garden On.

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Greenhouse Gardening in Fall – It’s Time to Pull Up the Tomatoes

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mesclun lettuce mavis butterfield

Yesterday The Girl and I went out to the greenhouse to pick some lettuce for a dinner salad and were happy to see the mesclun lettuce we had planted earlier this fall was perfect for harvesting.
lettuce blend

Look at those leaves!!

Lettuce Mesclun Farmer's Market Blend Seeds

It’s almost November and here I am harvesting gourmet lettuce leaves. Does it get any better than that?

If I had to guess, I have about a 2 weeks worth of dinner salads in the 3-tiered pot I planted. I’m hoping I’ll be able to move the lettuce starts we have growing under grow lights in the house out to the garden by this weekend. Then we’ll see if I can successfully grow lettuce in our greenhouse this winter. {I’m keeping my fingers crossed}.

spinach

I’ve also got some spinach growing in a large pot as well. I can’t remember what variety it is though. Anyone know?

meyer lemon tree

And take a look at Lemon. As of this morning we still have 7 meyer lemons growing in the greenhouse. Not as many as I had hoped for, but I’ll take ‘em. I’m not sure when they are suppose to start turning yellow, but I suspect sometime in December or January.

sungold

Did I mention our tomatoes are on their way out?

Yep, these are the last of the Sun Gold tomatoes. :(

tomatoes grey mold stems

And what about the Green Zebra tomatoes you ask? Well… they’re dead.

tomatoes grey mold

Take a look at all the grey mold that has set in. Kinda creepy isn’t it?

Yep, it’s totally time to say goodbye to our heirloom tomatoes for the year and get the greenhouse prepared for winter. It’s coming, whether we want it to our not.

Do any of YOU have any tomatoes still growing? Are they on their last leg too or did you say goodbye to yours months ago?

Mavis wants to know.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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