10 Things to Do in Memphis

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10 Things to Do in Memphis

Memphis is one of those iconic American cities.  It houses so much by way of music culture–and a few years ago on my St. Jude or Bust trip, I had a chance to really check it out.  If you ever get the chance to explore it, here are a couple of must-not-miss stops:

graceland

  1. Graceland.  Elvis is still alive and well in Memphis.  Everyday, hundreds of tourists line up to walk through Elvis’s home, known as Gracaeland.  The decor alone is worth the trip.  It’s a hoot.  Plus, you can see the letters/posters from thousands of still-devoted fans lined along the gates.   It’s craziness.
  2. Peabody Ducks.  The Peabody hotel is famous for their daily duck show.  Each day, you can watch the ducks parade around the very elegant lobby.  What more can I possibly say?  It’s Memphis, baby.Beale St, Memphis
  3. Beale Street.  It really doesn’t matter, Monday through Sunday Beale Street is hopping with live music and BBQ.
  4. Mud Island River Park.  this park is free, and you can take a stroll along the Mississippi River.
  5. Memphis Botanic Garden.  Um, hello, have we met?  Of course you know I am going to include a garden on my list of suggestions.
  6. Memphis Zoo.  This is a great stop if you have little ones.  It’s certainly not the biggest zoo ever, but they do have a Panda bear, which is rad.
  7. Elmwood Cemetery.  Okay, call me nuts, but I LOVE walking through cemeteries.  Memphis has soooo much history–it represents the good, bad, and ugly in our country.
  8. Memphis Rock and Soul Museum.  If you are a music fan, this is a must-stop museum
  9. Slave Haven – This is the former home of the Burlke family, turned small museum.  It was one of the stops for the underground railroad, and it is worth seeing.
  10. Woodruff-Fontaine House.  This is a mansion built in 1870 that is now open to the public as a museum.  It is fully furnished and has mannequins dressed in 1870′s garb, making it a pretty cool little tour.  Fair warning:  there is a doll display that borderlines on creepy.

Have any of you been to Memphis?  What is your favorite thing to do?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



The Best Fall Road Trips

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The Best Fall Road Trips

I love the idea of road trips.  Packing everything into the car and taking off allows you to experience so much more of the country than a quick airplane flight.  Even when the road is littered with, well, ugliness, it kind of give you a new appreciation for the beauty in things when it is there.

This list of road trips is more of a bucket list than from experience.  It’s all the trips I would like to take…eventually.

  1. Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.  Apparently in about the 3rd week of October the trees are a color that will leave you speechless.  Plus, with the water right there, the reflection adds to the whole experience.  Taking the drive from Washington D.C. to Harpers Ferry is supposed to give you the most bang for your buck.   Plus, once you are there, you might as check out Bolivar Heights, an old civil war battlefield.
  2. Twain’s Great River Road.  Mark Twain  made this adventure iconic and with good reason, the trip down the Mississippi to Hannibal, MO will provide a wall of color in the fall.  It’s a chance to see what inspired one of America’s greatest story tellers.  {Better re-read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer one more time before you go.}  In Hannibal, you can visit Twain’s childhood home.
  3. Coastal Maine.  Start in Portland and make your way up Route 1.  You’ll get to see the trees changing, the lighthouses, and maybe stop off at Cape Elizabeth for a FRESH lobster dinner.
  4. Vermont.  Who doesn’t want to be able to say, “Oh, you should see Vermont in the fall.”  It is legendary for a reason.  It boasts some of the most scenic fall foliage in the country.  The Green Mountain and Mad River Byways are supposed to be pretty spectacular.  Along the way, you can stop off at Cold Hollow Cider Mill and do some cider tasting.  It doesn’t get more fall than that.
  5. Lake Placid, NY.  Getting to experience the color in the Adirondacks {the largest wilderness region in the East U.S.} in the fall would not be the worst thing in the world.  The park is 6 million acres, so there is no shortage of scenic opportunities.  If you time it right, you can hit the Flaming Leaves Festival in Whiteface Mountain.
  6. The Smoky Mountains, Gatlinburg, TN.  So, I have to admit, on our St. Jude or Bust trip two summers ago, I had a change to see the foliage in the Smokey Mountains when is was green.  Even with just shades of green, it was spectacular.  I can only imagine what it would look like in the fall.  If you need a little break from the car, Cades Cove is a national park that offers hiking, tours of 19th century homesteads and horseback riding–all while your enveloped in the fall colors.
  7. Gunnison to Crested Butte, Colorado.  The East coast can’t get all of the fall road trip love.  This trip boasts the largest aspen groves in the country.  Your trip will end at Black Canyon National Park in Gunnison.  The canyons alone would be worth the trip.
  8. Ricketts Glen State Park, Northeast Pennsylvania.  If you are willing to travel about 3 miles on foot, the park boasts 22 waterfalls.  Most of the trees are over 200 years old, so the trees will be something to write home about {if people actually still wrote home, that is.}
  9. Eastern Sierras, CA.  If you start at Coleville and head to Lundy Lake, then continue on to June Lane Loop and Mono Lake.  Finally head through Mammoth Lakes and end in Rock Creek Canyon.  The whole trip will offer foliage from aspens, willows and cottonwoods.  If the lakes aren’t enough, in the fall, you’ll even get to see snow capped mountain peeks.  It will be a “bouquet of color.”  If you don’t mind a bit of a detour, you can stop at Bodie.  It’s the largest preserved ghost town in the West.
  10. The Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, Taos, New Mexico.  Not only will the drive loop you from Taos through Eagle Next and Angel Fire, then back to Taos again, it will also offer tons of fall foliage and wildlife {elk, black bears, eagles}.  If you want to get out and stretch your legs, plan on a stop in Elizabethtown.  It’s an old gold mining Ghost Town.

Have any of YOU taken this trips?  Is it worth putting them on my bucket list?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Fee-Free National Parks Admission Days

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Mt.-Rainier-National-Park-waterfallYou know I love to travel, and while I’d hop a flight to London every month if I could swing it, there are so many cool places in the US I love exploring too. Some of our national parks top my list of awesome places to vacation to. I might not be much of a camper, but I love to hike. And I’ve seen some pretty amazing views while hiking through some of our national parks.

Did you know there are over 400 national parks in the US? Wowzas. Some of the best ones charge admission fees, so you’ll want to pay attention to the list of 2014 fee-free days below if you’re planning on visiting one of the fee-based national parks anytime soon:

Free National Park Admission Dates:

  • January 20- Martin Luther King Jr. Day
  • February 15-17- Presidents Day weekend
  • April 19-20- opening weekend of National Park Week
  • August 25- National Park Service Birthday
  • September 27- National Public Lands Day
  • November 11- Veterans Day

Other agencies participate in fee-free days as well. See the full list and participating agency below:

Dates Event Participating Agency
Jan. 20 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Bureau of Land Management
National Park Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
Feb. 15-17 President’s Day Weekend Bureau of Land Management
National Park Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
April 19-20 National Park Week’s opening weekend National Park Service
June 14 National Get Outdoors Day U.S. Forest Service
Aug. 25 National Park Service’s 98th Birthday National Park Service
Sept. 27 National Public Lands Day Army Corps of Engineers
Bureau of Land Management
Bureau of Reclamation
National Park Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
Oct. 12 National Wildlife Refuge Day U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Nov. 8-11 Veteran’s Day Weekend Army Corps of Engineers
Bureau of Land Management
Bureau of Reclamation
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Forest Service
Nov. 11 Veteran’s Day National Park Service

Mt. Rainier National Park vacations

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

7 Tips for Surviving a Red Eye Flight

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7 Tips for Surviving a Red Eye Flight

There’s no doubt about it, I love to travel, and when I do I actually prefer taking a red eye flight {gasp!}.

You can save time because it doesn’t cut into one of your vacation days…and obviously, you can save money.  Over the years, I’ve kind of mastered the red eye hangover.

Here’s 7 ways to survive a red eye, and still feel ready and refreshed for your vacation:

  1. I always pop a couple of ibuprofen right before take off so that I don’t get a headache from the airplane noise.  It is that whole ounce of prevention thing.
  2. Drink water or juice instead of soda or alcoholic beverages.  It’s not as fun, but believe me, your body with thank you for it.  Flying dehydrates you anyway, add poor quality sleep to the mix and you will feel like garbage.  It’s best to just avoid that altogether.
  3. Have your toothbrush handy and pop into the bathroom before you land.  That way, you don’t feel gross.  You can hit the ground running.
  4. Bring a jacket or a sweater.  If you get cold you can wear it, but a jacket/sweater = a pillow in my book.  You can wad it up and rest easy knowing you aren’t sharing drool with the last passenger from one of the shared airplane pillows.
  5. Get a window seat.  This is essential.  That way, you’ll have a wall to lean up against, and won’t have to rely on the guy that smells faintly of bologna sitting next to you. :)
  6. Dress for nappy time.  Yes, this is the time when sweats and comfy clothes are totally acceptable in public.  Being comfy will make sleeping sooooo much easier.
  7. Eat before you get on the plane.  Skip the in-flight $7 meal and try, if possible, to go straight to sleep.  This is about getting the most out of your sleep so you can enjoy your vacation.  It will also communicate silently to everyone around you that  you are not there to chit-chat.  It’s bedtime.

Do YOU take red eye flights?  What are your tips and tricks for surviving them?

~Mavis

See more of my travel tips HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

7 Tips for Saving Money on Rental Cars

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7 Tips  for Saving Money on Rental Cars

Rental cars are one of those necessary evils sometimes in traveling.  You need them to get to your destination, but it kind of stinks to pay such a huge part of the travel budget toward them.  There are all sorts of ways to get discounts and deals, though, if you are willing to dig.  {On a somewhat related note, ALWAYS remember to do a quick walk around the car to check for damage.  It is a step that can prevent paying for something you didn’t do, which is a total vacation downer.}

Over the years, I’ve picked up a few tricks, here are my top 7 ways to save money on rental cars:

  1. Lately when I travel, I’ve been going through Costco Travel for my rental car deals.  Their rates are almost always less.  Other places, like AAA, usually offer substantial discounts to members.  So, I suggest starting there first.
  2. If you are traveling for 5 days or more, make sure to check weekly rates.  Even if you return it after 5 days, the weekly rental rate might come at a substantial enough discount that it makes it a savings.
  3. Airport pick-ups are, on average, more expensive than renting a car off-site.  Which basically means that taking the train, bus, etc. into town and renting there could save you money at the exact same rental company.  Remember, you pay for convenience, if you are willing to be slightly inconvenienced, the savings might be worth it.
  4. Check your personal auto insurance before you leave.  Odds are, you are covered in a rental–so skip the in-house insurance offer and save some money.
  5. Free upgrades are awesome, if you need the space, but if not, remember, it just equates to more gas.  The better the fuel economy, the more money you’ll save.
  6. Typically, it’s best to fill the tank BEFORE you return the car.  Each rental car company offers different rates and fine print, so check with them first, but odds are, they will charge you a premium for the convenience of not filling the tank.
  7. Choose one driver and stick with that person.  Most companies charge extra to add additional drivers and it just isn’t worth the cost.  Choose one person to do all of the driving–and if there is an emergency, you might just have to break the care rental rules.  Gasp!

How about YOU, how do you save money on rental cars?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

The Best Way to Kill Time in an Airport

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The Best Way to Kill time in an Airport

The worst part of travelling has to be the getting there.  Flying is particularly time consuming, because these days, you practically have to get to the airport 5 days early {just in case it takes you forever to get through security}, and then, you get to look forward to long layovers.  Don’t get me wrong, people watching in an airport can tick quite a few minutes away, but even that gets old after awhile, so over the years, I’ve come up with a little bag of tricks to help kill some time, with minimal suffering.

primitive rug hooking

Here’s a few ideas for you, in case you are facing airport time in the near future {that kind of made it seem like a prison sentence, instead of the really cool opportunity that it provides to hurdle through the air to a new destination, but you get what I meant :) }:

  1. Bring something to keep your hands busy.  I always bring some sort of arts and crafts project, like rug hooking, knitting or sewing to do while I am waiting.
  2. Bring a book or an electronic reader.  This is your chance to read that novel everyone has been talking about.
  3. Bring the iPod.  Plug in your headphones and get lost in your music…or an audio book.  Otherwise, trust me, you will know everyone’s business.  The airport makes for close quarters and you will hear some, um, interesting telephone calls and conversations.
  4. Exercise.  Yep, use the time to walk for a little exercise.  You can put on some pretty serious miles walking up and down airport while you are waiting.
  5. Create a scavenger hunt.  If you are travelling with kids, plan on being the entertainment committee.  Create a simple scavenger hunt that will occupy their minds for a bit.  {Think:  brochures, strange snack foods, man with glasses, etc.}
  6. Splurge.  Most airports have a massage station.  Use them to “kick off” your vacation with a little R&R splurge.
  7. Buy a puzzle book, new app, etc.  Play a little Sudoku, do a crossword.  Take it old school or get the app.  Whatever floats your boat.
  8. If budget isn’t an issue, hit one of the restaurants.  You can kill some time while you chow down, or sip on an ice tea and people watch.
  9. Bring a laptop and tap into Amazon Prime or  Netflix.  It’s guilt-free t.v., because it’s not like you could be cleaning the house.  You’re stuck, enjoy it.
  10. If you have a travel partner, bring some cards and play a game–like with a real person, not against the computer :)

How do YOU kill time in an airport?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

10 Things to Do in Brussels, Belgium

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Things to Do in Brussels, BelgiumI was going through some photos of the trip The Girl and I took to Belgium in 2012 and just had to make a top 10 list of things to do in Brussels.

  1. Grande Place.  The Grande Place is a medieval square with tons of buildings dating back to the 17th century.  It’s got plenty of modern shopping and world class food.Musical Instruments Museum
  2. Musical Instruments Museum.  The Musical Instruments Museum is, well, just that a museum of musical instruments.  Only this one started in 1877, so it houses a pretty impressive array of over 8000 instruments.Mary Chocolatier
  3. Mary Chocolatier.  Seriously, this will be the highlight of your life.  It is the most amazing chocolate you’ve ever laid your lips on. {Check out this video. Willy Wonka would be jealous}
  4. Place Du Grand Sablon.  This is another pretty quaint square where you can peruse antique shops, nosh on some chocolate, or get a coffee and sit outside to people watch.Manneken Pis
  5. The Manneken Pis.  This is literally a statue of a little boy peeing into a fountain.  It dates back to around 1619.  The irony is that if a kid actually peed into the fountain, people would gasp–but turn that same idea into a bronzed statue and boom, it’s art.
  6. Hotel de Ville.  This gigantic building is the epitome of Gothic architecture.  It is seriously jaw-dropping.Mont des Arts Kunstberg
  7. Mont des Arts Kunstberg.  This park is literally like escaping to the woods in the middle of the city.  I doubt there is a bad time of year to visit–each season would offer a pretty spectacular stroll through nature.
  8. St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral.  Religious or not, church is worth a visit.  It is, true to Belgium form, amazing architecture, and pretty impressive inside as well.moof museum
  9. Moof Museum.  The Moof Museum is a museum of modern art.  It focuses pretty heavily on cartoon history, and it is on the smaller side, but if you enjoy the out of the ordinary, it’s worth a stop. Royal Palace brussels
  10. Royal Palace.  This is the official palace of the royals {though, not their residence}.  It is a beautiful palace with pristine grounds, and pretty amazing interior.  You can only visit during certain times of the year, though, so make sure to check before you plan a trip.

Have you ever been to Belgium?  Did the history in the architecture knock your socks off?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Plan an Affordable Girls’ Weekend Getaway

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015

I love going places with The Girl, Monkey Boy, and the HH, but every once in awhile, I love a good Girls’ Weekend too.  It’s a chance to laugh and be silly, without having to be “mom”.  For me, it doesn’t necessarily have to be far, it just needs to be a chance to get together and chat, share good food, and explore without any responsibilities.

I know, as a mom, it’s a luxury to get a weekend away–and planning it in a way that is affordable is key.  Also, planning together goes a long way to making sure each person gets what they need/want out of the trip.

Here’s a couple of tips/things to keep in mind if you are planning a Girls’ Getaway:

  • To keep things on the cheap, think of ways you can split costs.  Look for locations that you can drive to and share to the cost of gas.  Rent a condo and split the cost–plus, then you can cook, and save money too.  Somehow, cooking with girlfriends never seems like work.  {Better yet, it’s the perfect time to start fasting for clarity–it will save you tons.  Ha.}
  • Even just a night in a local hotel can seem like a getaway–make it a grown-up slumber party, complete with treats, movies, magazines, and judgment {kidding!}.  Make sure to freeze the bra of the first on to fall asleep–it’s a slumber party requirement.
  • Spend the afternoon sitting by the hotel pool, just in the name of catching up with no place else to go.  Plus, people-watching with girlfriends is always more amusing, I don’t know about you, but my friends are very insightful.
  • After you have decided on a destination, cost, date, etc. assign each person one task.  Someone can be in charge of hotel reservations, someone else can handle transportation, local restaurants or food plans, entertainment, etc. {I like to be in charge of assigning assignments.}
  • When choosing a location, think about all of those places/sites you might like to go, but your family would never be interested.  Girls’ trips are the perfect time to explore new places you might not get to go otherwise.  This might, in fact, be your chance to see the world’s biggest ball of yarn–don’t pass it up.
  • Book Club car rides.  {I know, I know, nerd alert}  Seriously, though, get a book on CD for long car rides–listen to it, and book club it afterwards.  It makes car rides go soooo much faster.  And it makes you feel quite intellectual and self-satisfied.
  • Be flexible.  If it really is just the company you want, check out what Groupon and Living Social have going.  You might be able to score an awesome deal to a place you never would have considered going.  {Mark be spontaneous and adventurous off your list.  Check and check.}

Do YOU do Girls’ Getaways?  What are some of the places you’ve gone?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Tips for Traveling Abroad – London

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mavis red phone booth london

One Hundred Dollar a Month reader, Sandra, recently contacted me with the following question,

My friend and I are planning a trip to London in July 2015. I’ve never been abroad and have read all your tips for traveling! Thanks so much! My question is: when you go, do you purchase a tour package or do you plan your own vacation? Which do you think is the better deal? We are planning to stay about a week. If you DIY, can I ask about how much you budget for museums/tours/etc? Also, do you walk the city or bus or subway? Thanks sooooo much! We are super excited to go and are trying to plan our budget. Thanks Sandra.

I have never purchased a tour package BUT I was a loyal viewer of Rick Steves PBS Series Europe Through the Back Door and was able to glean a great deal on how to save money while traveling abroad from that show.

london natural history museum

I don’t have  a set budget for museums and tours.  I typically try to find the tours and museums I know I want to hit, and then find a way to get discounted entrance fees, etc.  I build my budget around the discounts.  If it starts to add up to too much moolah, I scale back, cutting the least important stuff {to me} first.

london tube Piccadilly line

Here’s a couple of ways I save when traveling abroad:

  1. I use Trip Advisor to look up hotels and B&B’s.  I like that they have reviews, and I can get an actual sense of the place.  It’s a great place to start.  I usually choose a hotel based on location.  I want it to be centrally located to the activities I want, OR, I want it to be close to a subway.
  2. If possible, walk.  Cabs and car rentals REALLY add up.  If you can’t walk, get to know public transport.  Europe makes public transport a walk in the park–a very inexpensive walk in the park.  Subways, buses, trains, etc. are a great way to save.  Look into savings passes for public transport.  Cities want tourists to use their transport system, and more often than not, they offer great discounts, if you look.  If weather permits, you can also look into cheap bike rentals.  You will be able to experience a lot more of the city than just walking.  For more specifics, see how I get around London.
  3. To eat on the cheap, hit outdoor markets and/or grocery stores.  They will have prepared foods that are much cheaper than sit-down restaurants, and visiting the markets is pretty much an activity in itself.  You can also stock up on snack foods that you can carry with you, instead of spending big bucks at the cafes.
  4. Bed & Breakfasts offer both a clean place to stay AND a FULL breakfast {usually}.  They can really be worth the price {which in Europe, is typically VERY affordable, as compared to the “trendy” B&B’s in America}, if you factor in the food.
  5. Consider tour packages, IF you wanted to do everything in the package anyway.  If the tours don’t really float your boat, but they offer discounted prices, you really aren’t making the most of your experience.  If you only wanted to do 2-3 tours on the list, you may be cheaper to price them out separately anyway.  Need some ideas?  Check out 10 Things to Do in London.
  6. Travel light.  I know this doesn’t seem like an obvious money saving tip, but it is.  The lighter you travel the more options you have.  You can take an impromptu trip to the countryside by train without hesitation or complication, and it really limits your liability should you become a victim of theft.

sherlock homes 221b baker street london

Rick Steve’s website also has oodles of tips and tricks for saving money, beating the lines, and acclimating to the culture.

With a bit of planning, you’ll find saving money is a piece of cake.  Any of my readers have any more tips for Sandra?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Be a Good Houseguest

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how to be a good houseguest

While on our trip to the east coast my daughter and I had the privilege of being houseguests at both my friend JJ’s house in Virginia and her cousin Zoe’s farm in Lancaster County, PA.  Not only did this save my daughter and I a ton of money but it was also a way to spend some quality time with two families I absolutely adore.

I don’t know about you, but when people open their homes to me, I try really hard to leave a small imprint.  I want to be the kind of guest that people would love to have back.  I want The Girl to be that kind of guest too.

Here are my top 10 tips on being a great houseguest:

  1. Bring a gift. It doesn’t have to be big or expensive, but it should be a thoughtful token of your gratitude.  It’s just a simple way to say, “Hey, thanks for letting me sleep in your sheets.”  Think local–something your guest couldn’t easily get ahold of.
  2. Keep clean.  Your guest should hardly know you are there.  Keep your stuff confined to the space your host provides.  That means, don’t leave shoes, purses, etc. in the front entry way.  Slip them off and carry them to your room.  Your host should not have to look at your clutter…ever.clean dishes
  3. Offer to pitch in.  If your host provides a meal, help with dishes, wipe the counters…whatever you can do to be more help than work.
  4. Don’t complain.  This probably seems like a no-brainer, but if you are sleeping on an old pull-out bed, remember, it’s free.  No complaints about crappy sleep.  You are in their space, and they get to offer whatever they are willing/able and no more.  Special diets aren’t your host’s problem.  Be gracious and blend in with the culture of the house without complaining.  Enough said.
  5. Be clear about your plans.  Let your host know exactly how long you will be staying, what time you will be arriving, etc.  Let them know all of the activities you have planned, so they know when you will be out of the house.
  6. Don’t bring pets, kids, etc. unless you have already cleared it with your host.  Along the same lines, don’t invite other friends over to the house you’re staying at, it’s unfair to the host.
  7. Err on the side of modesty.  Don’t trippy trop from the bathroom to your bedroom in just a towel.  Get dressed out of your jammies before you make it into one of the common areas of the house, etc.  Everyone has different comfort levels, erring on the side of caution will keep you from unintentionally offending.
  8. Don’t expect your host to entertain you.  Have plans that include getting you out of the house frequently.  You can always invite your host to tag along, but it gives them a courteous “out” if they need to get some things done or need some personal time/space in their own house.
  9. Bring ALL of your own stuff.  Toothpaste, shampoo, etc.  Bring it all.  This includes personal snacks.  Don’t be raiding your host’s pantry whenever you get the munchies {unless they offer}.  That way, you leave a very small mark on the house you are staying.
  10. Send a thank you note after you leave.  I know it seems like over-kill when you have also brought a present, but being overly gracious never hurt anybody.

Those are the big ones as far as I am concerned?  Any I missed or that you strictly adhere to?  Even better, ever had a bad houseguest?  What did they do?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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