Pear Butter Recipe – Canning 101

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pear butter recipe

This afternoon The Girl and I made a batch of pear butter with a few of the pears we harvested last night. If you’ve never made pear butter you should give it a try. My favorite way to enjoy it is on toast or pancakes.

Here is the recipes – it’s easy, I promise.
Pear Butter RecipeIngredients

8 pounds pear {I used Anjou pears from our backyard}
1 cup water or apple juice {I used water}
1 cup sugar
3 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon cloves
pear butter canning recipeDirections

Wash, dry and quarter your pears.  Toss pears, water {or juice}, sugar, and spices in an 8 quart pot and bring to a boil.  Once you reach a boil, stir the pears, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the pears are tender {about 20 minutes}, stirring often.

Once the pears are soft, carefully spoon them in to a food mill to separate the peels, stems and seeds. Next place the pear mixture in a crock pot and cook on low for 6 hours, stirring occasionally and prepare for your house to smell awesome!

Once the pear butter has thickened and turned a dark brown color it’s time to can your bounty.

Bring a boiling-water canner, 3/4 full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.

Ladle the pear butter immediately into prepared jars {I used Weck jars} , filling to within 1/4 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw on bands. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. {Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.} Cover; bring water to gentle boil and process 10 min.

Remove jars and place upright on towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and refrigeration is necessary}. Yields 4 pints.

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Comments

  1. Would this recipe also work for apples to make apple butter? Also, is any lemon juice required for acidity when canning? This looks great, and I’d love to use it for apples.

  2. I use a similar recipe for apple butter but peel then use apple corer/slicer and dice apples for apple butter. Going to have to try the pear butter though, sounds delicious! Mavis, do you make your own allspice or buy it bulk? I make my own as I don’t use it but maybe 3 times a year. And since I go through cloves like water, I buy whole ones and use micro planer to get just the best ground clove imaginable.

  3. Your pear butter looks awesome! This may not be a big deal, but I’d like to mention that pear seeds are not good for eating. They have small amounts of cyanide, like apples and stone fruits do. One year I made apple sauce just like this and ran the seeds through the food mill with the rest of the cooked apples. The finished product was noticeably off and I tossed it. Just in case.

  4. Using the crock pot to cook down fruit butters is not considered safe because the temperatures are not as high as they are if you boil the fruit butter in a pot on the stove. You can make it safe by transferring to a pot and bringing your fruit butter to a full boil right before you put them into the canning cars. This ensures that the heat will have time to properly penetrate to the center of the canning jar, killing any unsafe bacteria or microbes. When you add fruit butter that is just crock pot temperature, the internal temp in the jar at the end of canning time may not be high enough. Please be safe! :)

    • I’ve been using a crock pot for years to make my various butters (apple, peach and apricot) and have never had a problem with any type of bacterial growth. I cook my butters for long periods of time, as does Mavis, and have never had a bad batch yet. I tweeked your recipe just a tad by coring and removing any seeds and pith before cooking as Wynne brought up. Haven’t done a pear butter yet so this looks scrumptious!

  5. Picked a ton of pears definitely going to make pear butter. Looks great -love the jars!!

  6. Thanks so much for posting this! I love this recipe so much I am currently cooking up my second batch!

    I found this page from a google search for pear butter since my Bartlett tree gave us an overwhelming bounty. I had already made pear cookies, bread, honey, and jam, and was looking for something new. This is my absolute favorite!

  7. Would you be willing to tell me where you got your jars in the above picturr? I LOVE them.

    • Mavis Butterfield says:

      I think I purchased them from Zulily {a daily deal site}. They are Weck Jars, and you can find them on Amazon as well Williams- Sonoma. :)

  8. littleink says:

    Do the pears need to be ripe for pear butter?

  9. Glen Triplett says:

    Used your basic recipe, but used nutmeg, cinnamon, a dash of orange extract, a dash of vanilla, a little orange juice and threw in some left over apples. Sampled a bit of leftovers while watching the pressure cooker do it’s thing and this is delicious. Thanks for the inspiration, I will be checking your site often.

  10. I don’t use sugar at all so I pour the pear butter in a big roasting pan and bake on low heat for about three hours or more and it makes it very very sweet and thick without sweetener and then I water bath can it.

  11. In reference to the above post – I bake it after it as been cooked overnight in the crock pot.

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