Friday Night at the Movies – A.D.D. and Loving It?!

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Tonight The Girl and I are going to watch A.D.D. and Loving It?!  It’s supposed to be a comprehensive look at A.D.D.–the good, the bad and the ugly.  I am actually super interested to see this one–I know a ton of people or their children who live with A.D.D. and I’m curious how they are going to portray it in the film.

add and loving it

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

PicMonkey Collage

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.



Bob Bowling Rustics – Recycled Garden Sheds and Art

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bob bowling RusticsWhen my friend El Presidente and I went to the Northwest Flower and Garden Show the other day I was so hoping local artist Bob Bowling would be there with his AMAZING rustic garden cottages and primitives. And Oh Happy Day, he was.

rustic primitive garden shed Bob Bowling

In a nutshell this guy’s stuff is one giant display of rusted awesomeness times 10 million.
bob bowling lending libraryOne of my favorite things he makes are these little Lending Libraries. They run about $425 and are made with old wood and found objects and man are they cool.

bob bowlings garden sheds

Check out this white washed tool shed. Ain’t she purty?

antique cherub

I loved the rusty old door knocker he used on this shed.rusted funnel garden art

If you’ve got an old rusted funnel, SAVE IT! Turned it into a planter.
bob bowling rustics garden shed

More funnels, parts to a chicken feed and who knows what else was used to make this faux primitive light fixture. And check out the wooden pegs holing up that shovel. It’s oozing with cool.
bob bowling Rustics

This garden table / work station  complete with antique windows and galvanized planter is pretty amazing as well. He even hung a chandelier in there too.

rusted rooster coppolaAnd last but not least, check out the rusted tin roof complete with a rusted weathervane and rooster.

I love this stuff!

How about you, is this your style?

~Mavis

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Broccoli From Seed

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broccoli

If you plan on growing broccoli this year now is a great time to start your seeds indoors. I like to start mine under grow lights in the office then harden them off right before setting them outside towards the end of March.

This year I’ll be planting 3 varieties of broccoli:

Brief description:  Broccoli is a cool weather green vegetable that’s super easy to grow.  It is a member of the cabbage family and is chocked full of nutrients.  I love it because it’s one of those crops you get to plant twice a year–in spring and again in fall. I mainly grow it for my daughter and husband.

brocolli raab seeds

Where to Plant Broccoli:  Plant broccoli in full sun in cooler weather, and partial sun in hotter weather.  Plant in raised beds, garden beds and/or containers. {I’ve always planted my broccoli in raised garden beds by one of my friends grows her broccoli in a large pot on her deck.

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/8″ deep.  Thin to 1 every 18″ {or one per pot} when seedlings are about 2″ tall.  Transplant outdoors when weather has cooled.

seattle garden blog broccoliGrowing Tips:   Plant in fertile soil and water regularly–avoid getting developing heads wet, though.  You can fertilize 3 weeks after transplanting for bigger yields but I’m more of a set it and forget it kind of gal. If you’ve got good soil, you can grow practically anything.

head of broccoli

How to Harvest:  Harvest when main head gets to be about 3″ in diameter, this will encourage the side shoots to grow.

harvesting broccoli

The side shoots will not get as big as the main head but they are just as delicious and can be eaten raw, steamed or in {my favorite} stir fry dishes and salads. regional planting guides

Are you ready to start your garden but you’re not sure when you should plant your seeds or set out your transplants? Head on over HERE and you’ll be taken to my handy dandy chart that’s broken down into what vegetables should be planted {or transplanted} each month in your area.

Anyone can do this. Dirt + Seeds+ Water = Food!

~Mavis

Here are a few of my Favorite Broccoli recipes:

Creamy Broccoli and Spinach Pasta Salad  recipe
Creamy Broccoli and Spinach Pasta Salad

Broccoli-Cranberry-and-Almond-Salad-with-Feta

Broccoli Cranberry and Almond Salad with Feta Salad

Roasted Broccoli Parmesan

Roasted Broccoli Parmesan

Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage and Broccoli
Baked Potato Casserole with Sausage 

quiche broccoli cheddar

Broccoli, Bacon, Cheddar Quiche

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Rhubarb {Start to Finish}

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how to grow rhubarb

I was at my local farm and garden store yesterday and spotted RHUBARB CROWNS!! You know what this means right? It’s almost time to get busy gardening people! Wahooooo.

If you have never grown rhubarb before, it’s super easy. In fact it’s so easy it’s one of my favorite things to grow. And it looks cool too, which is like a little added bonus if you ask me.

Here are some helpful tips on how to grow rhubarb:

Brief description: Rhubarb is a cool season, perennial crop and typically grows between May – September.  Once planted, rhubarb plants may remain productive for up to 10 -15 years.

rhubarb crownsWhere to Plant : Plant rhubarb in well drained soil that has been enriched with high organic matter {I use chicken fertilizer}. You should give each plant at least 1 yard of space {in all directions} to grow.

rhubarbPlanting Rhubarb Crowns: Cover the crowns with 2 inches of soil. If you plant rhubarb crowns too deep, it could delay production. Press the soil firmly around the roots and give it a drink. 

how to grow rhubarb

How to Harvest: Rhubarb stalks should not be harvested the first year. For best results, only harvest a few stalks the second year and by the third year you can harvest as much as you need.

rhubarbTo harvest rhubarb, cut the stalk at the soil line. You can cut all  stalks at one time, or harvest them as you need them. Once the rhubarb plant starts producing slender stalks, that is your cue that nutrient reserves for the plant are low and you need to stop harvesting.

how-to-harvest-rhubarb-mavis

My Favorite Rhubarb Recipes:

Rhubarb Cinnamon Jam

Vegetarian-Indian-Spiced-Lentils-with-Spinach-and-Rhubarb-recipeSlow Cooker Vegetarian Indian-Spiced Lentils with Spinach and Rhubarb

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Starting Peas in Gutters

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starting peas in gutters

Yesterday, I did something crazy.
planting in guttersI planted some sugar snap peas.

botanical interests sugar snap peas

Which is a little weird because most people either plant their peas on President’s Day or St. Patrick’s Day. But I couldn’t wait. With the excepting of pruning the raspberry patch and edging the lawn, all my major garden chores for this year are done {go ahead, hate me}.
starting peas in gutters

And you know what they say… Idle hands are the Devils playground. Or in my case, if I don’t start plant some seeds soon, I’m going to have a panic a major attack. planting peas in gutters

So peas it is. gutters in a greenhouse

Now you may be wondering why the heck I don’t just plant my pea seeds directly in the ground. And the reason is that it’s still too cold to plant peas in the ground {at least here in Washington state}. If I were to plant peas in the ground right now there is a good possibility they’d just rot.
gutters in a greenhouse

But by planting the peas in gutters now, and keeping them in the greenhouse for a few weeks until it warms up a bit, I’ll be able to get a jump start on the growing season.
mavis butterfield greenhouse garden blog

Why plant peas in gutters you ask?

greenhouse gutters

Well that’s easy.  Once the pea  plants are established {it will take 4-6 weeks} I’ll then be able to bring the gutters over to my garden boxes, make a small trench in the soil, and then slide the pea plants out of the gutters and into the garden.

It’s kind of a cool trick.

And it will work as long as the temps don’t go below 20 degrees because the greenhouse generally keeps the plants about 10 degrees warmer in the winter. And if the temps dip, well then I’ll simply have to remove the gutters from the greenhouse and haul them into the garage for a few nights. Which the HH will totally be onboard with {not}.

Ahh yes, winter gardening is cool. Don’t you agree?

~Mavis

You might also be interested in:

 

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Winter Gardening in the Pacific Northwest

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winter greenhouse garden

Yesterday I finally finished digging up all the dirt from last years pumpkin patch. It was a HUGE job and I am glad to have that monkey off my back let me tell you.

Do you see that nice, fat mound of dirt all piled up perfectly {thank you OCD} next to the greenhouse? Well I have a secret. I’m going to plant something really cool there. It’s so cool I’ve been dreaming about it since last summer in fact. I’m keeping my lips sealed for a little longer though.

growing lettuce in greenhouse in winter

Later today I plan on planting some seeds in the empty greenhouse pots. There are 4 of them and I still don’t know what to plant in them. I’m planning on planting some bush variety tomato plants in the black pots in front of the greenhouse later this spring {If I can exercise some extreme patience that is}.

growing lettuce in winter stock tank

Inside the greenhouse the stock tanks full of lettuce are coming along. growing lettuce in winter

This one was planted late last fall and the lettuce is almost ready to harvest. lettuce

Check out the lettuce we have growing in pots. I’ll be harvesting this stuff later this week.
winter herbs herb garden

Have you checked on your herbs lately? Just outside the greenhouse we have oregano, purple sage, thyme and rosemary growing. Oh, and some chives too. If you’ve never planted chives before, you’ve got to give it a go. Chives are a perennial herb up here in Washington and I can pretty much harvest them 10 out of 12 months a year. They’re awesome.

That’s what’s happening in my backyard garden, how is yours coming along?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Monthly Garden Chores – February

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February Garden ChoresFebruary always gets me excited because I can really start some seeds indoors. I know it’s still winter outside, but with my grow lights blazin’, it feels like the gardening season is right around the corner.

heirloom tomatoes

Seeds I’m Starting Indoors this Month

grow-lightsSee the full list of seeds I’ll be planting this year

bare root grape vines

What I Plan to Plant/Transplant Outside this Month

  • Rhubarb
  • Raspberry Canes
  • Blueberry Bushes {towards the end of the month}
  • Fruit Trees {bare root variety, so you can get them in the ground while they are still dormant}

bare root fruit trees

Plants and/or Bulbs I Plan to Purchase this Month

  • Raspberry Canes
  • Blueberry Bushes
  • Fruit Trees

microgreens

What I plan to Harvest This Month

forcing bulbs

Houseplants and Indoor Bulbs

If you are forcing indoor bulbs, keep the soil barely moist. If you are starting to see some sprouting, it is time to bring the pot into the brightest room you can. As the days get longer, you can start to increase your watering schedule on houseplants. Make sure to continue to check them for dust and spider mites.

purning hedges

Trees and Shrubs

Late February is a good time to prune some of those deciduous trees and shrubs. Remove any dead branches or crossed branches. Avoid pruning any spring flowering shrubs, they like it better if you wait until after they’ve bloomed.

Weed and Pest Control

Nature is doing the job for you here. The cold weather will keep the pests at bay for now.

Lawn Care

Enjoy a final month of nothing to do with the lawn. Those of you in colder climates may get a couple more months of relaxation, but here in Washington, it’s coming to an end.

These garden chores are based on my Zone 8a Seattle/Tacoma WA location. Find your garden zone HERE.

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

Friday Night at the Movies – Bletchley Circle

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A HUGE thank you to Melissa from Facebook who recommended The Bletchley Circle.  I watched the 3 part mini series last weekend and it was awesome.  It’s about a group of women {one of whom spent her days during WWII cracking Nazi codes} that reunite to track a serial killer before he strikes again. Netflix has it for free!

bletchley circle

Let me know what you think if you decide to watch it–or if you have already seen it.

Peace out Girl Scouts & have yourself a great weekend,

~Mavis

PicMonkey Collage

Looking for more movies?

Check out the full list of my Friday Night at the Movies Selections or click on over & look at all the movies on Amazon Instant Video. There are a ton of videos to choose from that will cost you absolutely nothing {nada, zilch, free-o} with Amazon Prime; like thousands of regular movies & TV shows & hundreds of documentaries {Wahoo!}. Get all the details HERE!

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Make Newspaper Seedling Pots

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How to Make Newspaper Seedling Pots

Have you ever made your own newspaper pots before? If you haven’t, they are are super easy to make. Some people use tin cans, but I prefer to use the Pot MakerI’ve found I can whip out a batch of 50 pots for my seedlings in about 20 minutes or less.

pot makerHere is a quick tutorial on how to use the Pot Maker.

newspaper

Cut newspaper strips 4″ by 9″ each. {20 pots = 20 strips of newspaper}how to make a paper pot

Cover pot maker with newspaper and roll.
make your own paper pot

Make sure your paper is wrapped tight around the pot maker.how to make a paper pot

Fold the bottom of the paper inward.how to make a paper pot

Place the newspaper wrapped pot maker in the stand that’s included with the kit and give it a little twist.how to make a paper pot

And a jiggle.how to make a paper pot seedlings

Then slowly remove the newspaper from the wooden pot maker. how to make a seedling paper pot

It’s that easy.
paper pot for seedlings

Add potting soil, seeds and a little bit of water and you’re good to go. DIY-paper-pot-seedlings

These pots are not only easy to make, but pretty thrifty too. Free newspaper √ Free labor √ {have your kids make them} Life is good! Bontanical Interests has the Pot Maker on sale right now for $12.98.

Do you make your own pots or just buy them at the store instead?

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

How to Grow Onions – Start to Finish

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botanical interests seed packets yellow granex onion

Yesterday I planted a  packet of Yellow Granex Onion seeds and thought I would repost this little how to grow onions tutorial for those of you have never grow your own onions from seed before. Not only are growing your own onions super easy to do, if you plant them now they should be ready around the same time your tomatoes are ready to harvest.  And you know what that means right?

Homemade Salsa and Heirloom Tomato Sauce baby!

onion seeds picture

Brief description: The Yellow Granex Onion is mild, sweet, and great for storing {also known as Vidalia Onion}. If you are from Washington State, and like Walla Walla Sweet onions, my dad told me these taste just like them.

Where to Plant Onions:  They thrive in warmer climates with 12 hours of sunlight. Onions can be sown directly outside starting in late fall for a late spring harvest. Or started indoors in early January {like I’m doing} and transplanted outside in early spring when the weather warms up. Onions do well in a sunny location/raised beds/or even a greenhouse.

yellow granex onion

Planting Seeds:  Plant seeds 1/4″ to 1/2″ deep, with 2 seeds every 4 inches apart.

onion transplants

Growing Tips:  Water throughout growing season, including winter.  Onions can withstand a freeze if they are sufficiently hydrated.

How to Harvest:  Harvest when their necks feel soft and/or the tops have fallen over. When 50% of the tops have fallen over and are lying on the ground, go ninja and knock the rest over. Then about a week or two later when much of the foliage has dried, carefully dig the onions out and dry them in the garden in the sun for a couple of days.

After drying, remove the roots, clip the stems so you are leaving about 1″ of the neck.

Have you ever thought about storing your onions in pantyhose? All the cool people are doing it! Go HERE to learn how.


Favorite Recipes with Onions - 

French Onion Soup – Perfect for chilly winter nights.

Favorite recipes with onions 

Rainbow Salsa – Homemade salsa is the best stuff on earth.

Will YOU be growing onions this year? Do you have a favorite variety? Do tell!

~Mavis

This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting One Hundred Dollars a Month.

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